Tender Mercies

The tender mercies of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus are an inexhaustible treasure that our own hearts, stained by so many sins and our own disordered self-love and lack of meekness and humility, can fathom only faintly. To think that the very Co-Equal and Co-Eternal only begotten Son of God the Father condescended to become Man in Our Lady was Virginal and Immaculate Womb by the power of God the Holy Ghost so that He could pay back in that Sacred Humanity the debt that we owed Him in His Infinity as God, a debt that finite creatures could not pay back on their own. The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, formed out of the Immaculate Heart of Mary while He was developing inside the tabernacle of her Virginal and Immaculate Womb, beat for us with inexhaustible love from the moment of Its first beat, which was in unison with the Immaculate Heart of Mary, and beats for us still in tabernacles of authentically Catholic churches in the Most Blessed Sacrament.

Our Lord has been intent on showering us with the tender mercies of His Most Sacred Heart from the time of His Incarnation. Although He has Ascended to the Father’s right hand in glory and will come in glory to judge the Living and the Dead on the Last Day (a time that I, for one, make no pretense of predicting as I am most conscious that this very day could be my own “last day,” which was one of the points I was trying to make in my initial posting on the home page of this site two days ago; we must always be prepared for death–and to accept with perfect equanimity and joy whatever kind of death God has prepared for us), Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ’s Most Sacred Heart beats in the Most Blessed Sacrament with incomprehensible, unmatched love for us erring sinners whose hearts are frequently so cold, so fickle, so lukewarm, so filled with earthly cares and considerations.

Imagine the patience and the forbearance and the meekness with which Our Divine Redeemer, through Whom all things were made and by Whose Sacrifice of the wood of the Holy Cross to the Father in Spirit and in Truth in atonement for our sins we have been remade as adopted sons and daughters of the living God, loves us and bears with us despite our infidelities and our ingratitude and the lack of charity we show to our fellow man as we engage in rash judgments and show hardness of heart by failing to forgive others as we ourselves have been forgiven so frequently in the Sacred Tribunal of Penance and as we fail to perform the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy, especially by failing to seek the conversion of those who are outside of the true Church to her maternal bosom before they die. Imagine how much Our Lord’s Most Sacred Heart is filled with sorrow for the loneliness It experiences as It awaits our acts of love and humble prostration in the Most Blessed Sacrament as we consider ourselves “too busy” for even brief visits with Our Lord and Our God Who comes to us in Holy Communion every day and Who, though Our Divine Judge, wants to serve as Our Divine Physician in the Sacred Tribunal of Penance.

How do we repay the tender mercies of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus?

Usually by forgetting that others bear within themselves the Divine impress and that we must treat them as we would treat Our Lord Himself. We forget that we must hang on the crosses that God has fashioned from all eternity for us to be affixed so that we can unite our prayers and our sufferings and our sacrifices and calumnies and humiliations to those He experienced once during His Passion and Death, accepting each of our crosses with joy and with gratitude as we surrender freely whatever merit we might earn from bearing them to the Immaculate Heart of Mary as she, the very Mother of Divine Grace and Help of Christians, our Queen of Mercy, distributes those merits as pleases God for His greater honor and glory and for the good of souls, both those in the Church Militant on earth and those in the Church Suffering in Purgatory. We repay the tender mercies of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus by living according to the dictates of naturalism rather by attempting to view all things at all times through the eyes of the true Faith and as we seek to plant a few seeds for the restoration of the the Social Reign of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. We are, to be honest, ingrates as we fail to repay the tender mercies with even the smallest amount of acts of fervor and devotion.

Father John Croiset wrote of the pain we have caused Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ’s Most Sacred Heart by our failure to make room for Him in the “inns” of our hearts by our worldliness and our attached to vain pleasures and earthly amusements:

Consider that it was no less afflicting and sad for Jesus Christ to see the ingratitude of the majority of the faithful, who would have only coldness and indifference for Him in the Sacrament of His love. He saw the little esteem, nay, even the contempt with which they would treat this greatest proof of His love. He saw that no matter what He might do to be loved by the faithful, even dwelling always amongst them in the Blessed Eucharist, neither this excess of His love, nor His benefits, nor His very presence would be capable of making the greater part of them love Him or would prevent them from forgetting Him. he saw that those churches in which He was to be sacramentally present would be left for most of the time without adorers. He saw what little reverence, nay, what disrespect would be shown in His presence. He saw clearly how the greater part of His followers, who spend long hours in vain amusement and useless visits and complete idleness, would rarely find a quarter of an hour to spend before Him in the Blessed Sacrament. He knew how many others would visit Him only under compulsion and without either devotion or reverence. And finally, He saw the very small number who would eagerly visit Him and devoutly adore Him. He saw clearly that the greater number take no more notice of Him than if He were not really present in the Blessed Sacrament or than if He were a person of no consequence.

The harsh treatment which He received from the Jews, Gentiles and heretics was indeed very painful to Him, but they were His open enemies. But could we ever thought it possible that those who recognize His benefits, that those who make profession of being faithful to Him, that His own children should not only be insensible to His benefits and in no way touched with compassion at the sight of the grief caused by such contempt, but that they should treat Him with contempt by their irreverences and sacrileges? Our Saviour might well say: “If pagans and Turks and infidels had treated Me so, I might have endured it.” “for if my enemy had reviled me, I would verily have borne it”. (Ps. 54:13), but that Christians, Catholics whom I have not only redeemed, but have fed and nourished with my Body and Blood, should have nothing but contempt for Me, that they should treat Me with ingratitude, is too much. “But thou a man of one mind, my guide and my familiar: who didst take sweetmeats together with me! (Ps. 54: 14-15)

What must be the sentiments of this most generous and tender Heart of Jesus which has so loved men, and which finds in the hearts of those men only coldness and contempt? “I am become a reproach among my enemies.” (Ps. 30: 12). If after exposing Myself to the contempt and hatred of My enemies in the midst of the outrages which I suffer, I could at least find a large number of faithful friends who would console Me! But it is quite the contrary: “They that saw me without fled from me.” (Ps. 30:12) The greater number, seeing that I have disguised Myself under the feeble appearance of bread in order to have the pleasure of dwelling among men, abandon Me and forget Me as a person who has no place in their hearts, “I am forgotten as one dead from the heart.” (Ps. 30:13)  (Father John Croiset, The Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus: How to Practice the Sacred Heart Devotion, republished by TAN Books and Publishers.)

Even in this, however, the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus overflows with tender mercies for us ingrates. Our Lord beckons us to be conformed to the tender mercies of his own Most Sacred Heart through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary.

A kind word to a stranger.

An invitation to a passer-by placed into our lives by God’s Divine Providence to embrace the Faith.

A word of forgiveness offered to someone from whom we are estranged.

A prayer offered for those from whom we are separated as a result of the nefarious schemes of the conciliar revolutionaries, who have done a remarkable job of setting members of the household of the Faith against each other as they, the revolutionaries, have blasphemed God repeatedly and distorted and misrepresented His Deposit of Faith.

A prayer said for those very conciliar revolutionaries so that they will have the humility to abjure their errors publicly before they die.

An extra Rosary prayed in reparation for our sins and those of the whole world.

A dessert that goes unordered.

There are an endless variety of ways that we can let Our Lord conform our own hearts of stone into hearts of flesh as the consecrated slaves of His Most Sacred Heart through His Blessed Mother’s Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart.

The tender mercies of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus overflow into our cold, indifferent hearts of stone especially during times of particularly difficult sufferings. So many are the cases known to us at this very time of Catholic men and women suffering the heartbreak of spouses who consider them to be “mentally ill” for their embrace of the Faith, for their desire to be less worldly than they had been in the past, for their desire to make more sacrifices of love to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus through the Immaculate Heart of Mary, for their willingness to suffer calumny from their own closest relatives and friends for coming to recognize that men such as Joseph Ratzinger expelled themselves from the Catholic Church decades ago by clinging to and propagating beliefs condemned solemnly by the authority of the Catholic Church, our spotless mother on earth who keeps the articles contained in the Deposit of Faith “intact for ever” so “that they might be brought with ease and security to the knowledge of men” (cf. Pope Pius XI, Mortalium Animos, January 6, 1928.) It is especially in times of such persecution from one’s own spouse that one must show forth the tender mercies of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus.

Our Lord Himself taught us that we would be hated by members of our own household. Why are we so slow to believe Him. Why are we so reluctant to render unto the members of our household the tender mercies that are shown unto us by the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus Itself?

The brother also shall deliver up the brother to death, and the father the son: and the children shall rise up against their parents, and shall put them to death. And you shall be hated by all men for my name’s sake: but he that shall persevere unto the end, he shall be saved. And when they shall persecute you in this city, flee into another. Amen I say to you, you shall not finish all the cities of Israel, till the Son of man come.

The disciple is not above the master, nor the servant above his lord. It is enough for the disciple that he be as his master, and the servant as his lord. If they have called the goodman of the house Beelzebub, how much more them of his household?

Therefore fear them not. For nothing is covered that shall not be revealed: nor hid, that shall not be known. That which I tell you in the dark, speak ye in the light: and that which you hear in the ear, preach ye upon the housetops. And fear ye not them that kill the body, and are not able to kill the soul: but rather fear him that can destroy both soul and body in hell. Are not two sparrows sold for a farthing? and not one of them shall fall on the ground without your Father. But the very hairs of your head are all numbered.

Fear not therefore: better are you than many sparrows. Every one therefore that shall confess me before men, I will also confess him before my Father who is in heaven. But he that shall deny me before men, I will also deny him before my Father who is in heaven. Do not think that I came to send peace upon earth: I came not to send peace, but the sword. For I came to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law.

And a man’s enemies shall be they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me, is not worthy of me; and he that loveth son or daughter more than me, is not worthy of me. And he that taketh not up his cross, and followeth me, is not worthy of me. He that findeth his life, shall lose it: and he that shall lose his life for me, shall find it. He that receiveth you, receiveth me: and he that receiveth me, receiveth him that sent me. (Matthew 10: 21-40.)

We have been told by Our Lord Himself, in whose breast beats His Most Sacred Heart, that others will hate us. We must note hate in return. We must never be bitter. We must never hold onto or nurse grudges. Nothing anyone says to us or does to us is the equal of what one of our least Venial Sins caused Our Lord to suffer in His Sacred Humanity during His Passion and Death and caused His Most Blessed Mother to suffer as those Seven Swords of Sorrow were thrust through and through into her Immaculate Heart.

It was nothing other than the love that beats for us in the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, aflame with a desire for our sanctification and salvation, that caused these words to issue forth from the mouth of Our Divine Redeemer during the Sermon on the Mount:

Blessed are they that suffer persecution for justice’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

Blessed are ye when they shall revile you, and persecute you, and speak all that is evil against you, untruly, for my sake: Be glad and rejoice, for your reward is very great in heaven. For so they persecuted the prophets that were before you.. . .

You have heard that it hath been said, Thou shalt love thy neighbour, and hate thy enemy. But I say to you, Love your enemies: do good to them that hate you: and pray for them that persecute and calumniate you: That you may be the children of your Father who is in heaven, who maketh his sun to rise upon the good, and bad, and raineth upon the just and the unjust.

For if you love them that love you, what reward shall you have? do not even the publicans this? And if you salute your brethren only, what do you more? do not also the heathens this? 48 Be you therefore perfect, as also your heavenly Father is perfect. (Matthew 5: 10-12; 43-48.) 

To love as the Sacred Heart of Jesus loves us is not to overlook error or to make any compromises with heresy, which grieves the twin hearts of matchless love, the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary. To love with the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus requires us to pray for the erring and to recognize that many of us have been too frequently on the wrong side of eternal life and eternal death issues of our own salvation.We must forgive as we are forgive, defending the Faith firmly, to be sure, but always out of the motive of a pure a love for Love Incarnate that the graces sent to us through Our Lady’s loving hands can make possible in our own frequently cold hearts.

Saint Gertrude the Great was given to see clearly the mysteries of love contained in the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. We could profit form partaking of the clarity with which Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ endowed her during her lifetime over seven hundred years ago now:

Now, as the end of time approaches, He says to us what He once announced by the beloved Apostle of His Sacred Heart [Saint Gertrude the Great]: “Let him who thirsts for happiness, grace, and peace, come to My Divine Heart, their source, and draw from it ‘gratis’ whatsoever he will. My merciful Heart, which desires before the end of time to glorify itself by a supreme manifestation, and to love men to the utmost bounds of affection, has arranged all for this end.

“Let these languid souls come only to Me, confide in My goodness, and abandon themselves to My love. Let them be at rest in the meekness of My Heart, unite themselves to My humility and obedience, and they will no longer feel the weight of My yoke through the abundant consolation with which I will favor them. Come, then, without fear or delay, and abandon yourselves lovingly and for ever unto Me.” (Father Andre Prevot, Love, Peace and Joy: Devotion to the Sacred Heart According to St. Gertrude, published originally in 1911.)

Father John Croiset noted the sufferings that Our Lord endured for us during His Passion and Death in order to redeem us. How wen our hearts refuse any suffering to be united with His own Most Sacred Heart through His Blessed Mother’s Immaculate Heart?

Consider what were the sentiments of Jesus Christ when he represented to Himself distinctly, on the one hand, the singular benefits which He had lavished on His chosen people, and on the other, the cruelties and outrages which He was about to receive from this same nation, notwithstanding so many benefits. All the graces which had preceded His coming had been given to them only in view of the merits of Jesus Christ. It was particularly for this people that he had become man; it was among them, in preference to all other people, that He had chosen His parents and His friends, that He had performed His miracles and preached His doctrine, and for all these benefits he received nothing but harshness, persecution and opprobrium. He was refused a lodging at birth; He was no sooner born than He was compelled to seek shelter in a foreign country. With what indignity was He not treated during His public life! But what has He not suffered at His death! He was seized like a robber. He was dragged like a criminal along the same streets through which He had been led in triumph a few days before as the Messiah. He was struck on the face as an insolent person; in the house of Caiphas, He was spat upon as a blasphemer. He was treated as a mock king and an imposter, He was delivered up to the terrible cruelty of the demon-possessed rabble during the while night in the dungeon of Caiphas, where He suffered innumerable outrages. he was treated by Herod as a fool; He was condemned to be scourged like a wretched slave, and the criminal, Barabbas, was preferred to Him as being less wicked than He. Finally, He was condemned to the most ignominious death and was nailed to a Cross on which He expired in the sight of a huge multitude of people, most of them witnesses of His miracles, and even some in whose favor He had wrought miracles, without finding a single one among that crowd to take His part, or to offer Him consolation. From insensibility to His sufferings, they even passed to contempt, and from contempt to execration. But perhaps these people were deceived? No; they knew that His life had been holy, exemplary; that it was spent doing good, working miracles for the afflicted; and it is even for that that they persecuted Him–for being too good.

All this presented itself clearly and vividly to Jesus Christ. He was perfectly conscious of the dignity of His Person, the greatness of His favors, the disinterestedness of His love, and the unworthiness, meanness, rage, and malice of those who treat Him such such cruelty.

A great soul, especially when it is possessed of great love and when it hopes by suffering to make that love known, is capable of giving itself willingly up to suffering; but the more generous and tender a person is, the more difficult he finds it to support injustice and ingratitude, especially when he seems himself sacrificed to the envy of his enemies and betrayed by those from whom he had a right to expect help in his affliction, and when he sees that his terrible sufferings and afflictions are not capable of inspiring these men with the least sentiment of compassion.

Never has any person more clearly and vividly represented to himself events in all their circumstances than Jesus Christ. Never had anyone a more generous heart, and consequently, no one was ever more sensible to ingratitude. With what torrents of bitterness was not that Sacred Heart of Jesus inundated when It represented to Itself what He had done for this people and what this people was going to do to Him. Let us, who are so sensible to contempt, especially contempt from people whom we have most obliged; let us judge what must have been the sentiments of Jesus Christ at the sight of this spectacle. (Father John Croiset, The Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, republished by TAN Books and Publishers, pp. 274-274.)

Our Lord revealed the secrets of His Most Sacred Heart to Saint Gertrude the Great in the Thirteenth Century and to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque in the Seventeenth Century at a time when the darkness of Jansenism had rendered the hearts of so many men as cold and as embittered as they are today in a world which is being chastised by a lack of true priests and thus of a lack of true Masses and thus of a lack of Sanctifying and Actual Graces. We must, as Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque prayed, make acts of reparation to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus for our sins and those of the whole world, taking upon ourselves more and more voluntary penances and offering them to this Heart of Hearts that was pierced for our sakes with the lance of Saint Longinus as every single drop of the Most Precious Blood that had been generated therein.

Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque composed the following prayer to her Divine Visitor Who desires that each one of us approach the font of Mercy that is His Most Sacred Heart through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of His Most Blessed Mother:

O Divine Heart of Jesus, inexhaustible Source of love and goodness, ah! how I regret that I have forgotten Thee do much and loved Thee so little! O Sacred Heart, Thou dost merit the reverence and love of all hearts which Thou hast cherished so much and laid under infinite obligations. And yet Thou dost receive from the greater number nothing but ingratitude and coldness, and especially from my own heart which merits Thy just indignation. But Thy Heart is all full of goodness and mercy, and of this I wish to avail myself to obtain reconciliation and pardon. O Divine Heart, I grieve intensely when I see myself guilty of such cowardice and when I consider the ungrateful conduct of my wicked heart, which has so unjustly stolen the love that it owes to Thee and bestowed it on myself or on vain amusements.

O Heart most meek, if the sorrow and shame of a heart that recognizes its error can satisfy Thee, pardon this heart of mine for it is sorry for its infidelity and ashamed of the little care which it has taken to please Thee by its love. O Sacred Heart of my Saviour, what could I expect from all this but Thy displeasure and condign punishment if I did not hope in Thy mercy. O, Heart of my God, Heart most holy, Heart to which alone belongs to pardon sinners, do Thou in Thy mercy pardon this poor miserable heart of mine. All its powers unite in a supreme effort to make reparations to Thee for its wanderings from Thee and the disordered application of its love.

Ah! how have I been able hitherto to refuse Thee my heart, I who have so many obligations to make Thee its sole possessor, nevertheless I have done so. But now how I regret that I have wandered away from Thee, from the love of Thee who art the Source of all goodness, in a word, from the Heart of my Jesus, who although needing me not, hast sought me out and lavished Thy favors on me. O adorable Heart of Jesus, is it possible that my heart can have treated Thee thus, my heart which depends entirely on Thy love and thy benefits and which, if Thou shouldst take them from it, would fall into the utmost extremes of misery or be reduced to nothingness? Ah! how I am beholden to Thy goodness, O indulgent Heart of my Saviour, for having borne with me so long in my ingratitude! Oh! how timely Thy mercies come to pardon my poor, inconstant heart!

O Heart of my Jesus, I now consecrate to Thee and give Thee all my love and the source of my love, which is my heart; I give Thee both irrevocably, although with great confusion for having so long refused Thee Thine own possessions. O Divine Heart, my very capability of bestowing my poor hear on Thee is a proof of Thy great love for me, but alas! I have availed myself badly of such a favorable opportunity to merit Thy love and grace. Oh! how great is my confusion at the thought of this! O Heart of my Jesus, reform my faithless heart, grant that henceforth it may bind itself to Thy love by its own, and that it may approach Thee as much in the future as it has wandered away from Thee in the past, and as Thou art the Creator of my heart, may Thou, I beseech Thee, one day give it the crown of immortality.

We must show forth the tender mercies of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus at all times. We cannot show forth these tender mercies unless our hearts of stone are indeed turned into hearts of flesh as the Prophet Ezechiel wrote, prophesying the transformation of hearts that would take place as a result of the bright, burning love of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus that was formed out of and beats as one with the Immaculate Heart of Mary:

For I will take you from among the Gentiles, and will gather you together out of all the countries, and will bring you into your own land. And I will pour upon you clean water, and you shall be cleansed from all your filthiness, and I will cleanse you from all your idols.

And I will give you a new heart, and put a new spirit within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and will give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my spirit in the midst of you: and I will cause you to walk in my commandments, and to keep my judgments, and do them. And you shall dwell in the land which I gave to your fathers, and you shall be my people, and I will be your God. And I will save you from all your uncleannesses: and I will call for corn, and will multiply it, and will lay no famine upon you. And I will multiply the fruit of the tree, and the increase of the held, that you bear no more the reproach of famine among the nations.

And you shall remember your wicked ways, and your doings that were not good: and your iniquities, and your wicked deeds shall displease. It is not for your sakes that I will do this, saith the Lord God, be it known to you: be confounded, and ashamed at your own ways, O house of Israel. Thus saith the Lord God: In the day that I shall cleanse you from all your iniquities, and shall cause the cities to be inhabited, and shall repair the ruinous places, And the desolate land shall be tilled, which before was waste in the sight of all that passed by, They shall say: This land that was untilled is become as a garden of pleasure: and the cities that were abandoned, and desolate, and destroyed, are peopled and fenced. (Ezech. 36: 24-35.)

This is also a prophecy, I believe (speaking entirely without any claim to prophetic insight whatsoever as I have no such insight or mystical gifts in the slightest, just a plodding intellect that is slow to see plain truths on occasion), of the restoration of the Church Militant on earth that has been devastated by the apostasies and blasphemies of Modernity and Modernism, a Church Militant on earth that has been devastated as well, if we are really honest with ourselves, ladies and gentlemen, by our own sins and our own indifference and our own ingratitude towards the tender mercies of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and our forgetfulness to keep the Nine First Fridays of Reparation to that Most Sacred Heart and the Five First Saturdays of Reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

The Sacred Heart of Jesus was emptied of every last drop of Its Most Precious Blood. as Father Francois Charmot, S.J., wrote in In Retreat With the Sacred Heart, to show forth the love of the God the Father for us as God the Son gave up His life in obedience to His Father in Spirit and in Truth to make it possible for us to know an unending Easter Sunday of glory in Paradise before that same Most Holy Trinity:

If I did not have some knowledge of the Heart of Jesus, how little would I realize the love of the Father!

But, looking upon the pierced Heart of the Incarnate Word, I can say with assurance: blessed be Thou, O Father of Our Lord Jesus Christ, who, in Him, has heaped upon us all Thy spiritual blessings!

Before the creation of the world Thou hast chosen us in Jesus, in order that we may be holy with Him, through the love of the blessed Trinity.

Thy Son is charity, s Thou, Father, art charity.

He is all charity, as thou art all charity.

The charity of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost is the same, equal in Three Persons.

There are not three charities, but one singe coeternal love.

With what love I have been loved infinitely, neither more nor less by Thee, Father, than by the Son and by Thy Holy Spirit, since before the creation of the world!

If I believe that Jesus loves me, I believe that His Father loves me just as much, and it is Thy Word who declares to me that Thou, Father, and Thy Holy Spirit wish to dwell in me.

All those whom the Heart of Jesus loved: His disciples, the children, the sinners, the diseased, the poor, the humble, the persecuted.

Thou, Father, also loved them with the same love.

The Blessed Virgin was loved no less by Thee than by Thy Son, her Son, and by Thy Spirit.

O Father of Our Lord Jesus Christ, blessed be Thou for having foreordained that we should be Thy Sons in thine only begotten Son, sons of adoption through Thy Son incarnate

Thou hast willed, by this gracious predestination, that the Heart of Thy well-beloved Son should make us sharers in the love of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.

For this Heart encompasses all that the charity of the Three Persons could communicate from its Fire to the Incarnate Word.

In this Heart we possess by heritage such an effusion of the Holy Spirit, such a furnace of love, such an ocean of mercy, such an outpouring of tenderness, that it is impossible to imagine any others in some perfect creature which would be closer to infinite charity.

That is why, O Father, we know thy love through the Heart of Jesus.

Kind Father, kindest of Fathers, incomparably kind Father, Thou hast willed that through the pierced Heart of Thy Son, we should know the extent of Thy charity, Thy goodness, Thy paternity,  Thy longanimity, Thy mercy, Thy pardon, Thine eternal remission of sin.

And when this Heart which has so loved men–even to the shedding of all Its blood for them–finally ceased to beat, the death of Thy Son bore witness, even as the sacrifice of His Father who had delivered Him, that the love of the Three Persons for us outweighs the very life of the Man-God.

Through the pierced Heart of Thy Son, O infinitely good Father, grant me the grace to believe implicitly in Thy love, to love Thee as a Son, as Thy Son Jesus, who abandoned Himself to Thee in the agony and on the cross in utter helplessness and total destitution, solely because Thou were His Father.

I cast myself into Thy paternal arms, as a prodigal son, knowing that Thou art more kind even than my Mother Mary, moving loving even than the Heart of Jesus, through whom I have come to know the immensity of Thy love.

Pater, in manuas tuas commendo spiritum meum.

Father, in life and in death, in dangers, in temptation, in sin, in doubt, in error, in the folly of my heart, in grief, in discouragement, everywhere and always, whatever may happen, united with the Heart of Jesus, I abandon myself to Thy paternal goodness, source of all goodness. (Father Francois Charmot, S.J., In Retreat With the Sacred Heart, The Newman Press, 1956, pp. 16-19.)

We can come to know, love and serve God the Father and God the Son and God the Holy Ghost more and more fully is we permit our hearts of stone to be turned into turned into hearts of flesh after the pattern of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus if we make the time to spend with Our Beloved in His Real Presence in the Most Blessed Sacrament. And our time before Our Lord’s Real Presence will help us to love others more purely as we will their good, the ultimate expression of which is the salvation of their immortal souls as members of the Catholic Church.

Although Paschaltide ended after the Mass on the Vigil of Pentecost on Saturday, June 7, 2014, our devotion to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus in His Real Presence in the Most Blessed Sacrament extends the glories of Paschaltide as we remember the love that Our Lord had to redeem us, the love that He showed to the Apostles in the forty days between His Resurrection and His Ascension, the love that He showed at the Ascension as He commissioned the Apostles to preach the Gospel to all men and to all nations so that each would be converted to the Catholic Faith unconditionally, the love that the Father and the Son showed upon us as God the Holy Ghost descended in tongues of flame on Pentecost Sunday, the love that is made possible by our regeneration in the very inner life of love of the Most Blessed Trinity at the moment of our Baptism, the love that is infused into our souls every day that we receive Holy Communion worthily, the love that grows all the more as we spend more and more time in His Real Presence.

Saint Gertrude the Great herself explained how we sought to show forth our love for Love Incarnate in the Most Blessed Sacrament:

Hail, Most Glorious Body, a most precious Blood of my Lord Jesus Christ, here truly present beneath these sacramental species; I adore Thee with all that devotion and awe wherewith the nine choirs of angels worship and adore thee. I prostrate myself before Thee in the spirit of humility, believing and professing that Thou, my Lord and my God, are herein most truly contained.

Hail, most glorious Body of Jesus Christ my Saviour, true Victim immolated upon the cross. I adore Thee in union with that adoration with which Thy Humanity adored Thy Godhead, and I give Thee thanks with all the love of all thy creatures, that Thou dost deign to remain hidden in this tabernacle for our salvation.

Hail, compassionate Jesus, Word of the Father, Brightness of His glory, Ocean of pity, Salvation of the world, most august and sacred Victim. Hail, Jesus Christ, Splendour of the Father, Prince of Peace, Gate of Heaven, True Bread, Son of the Virgin, Shrine of the Godhead.

I most firmly believe that  Thou, my God, are here present, and that Thou are looking out upon me from behind the veil of the sacrament, and dost behold all the most secret recesses of my heart. I believe that under this species of bread are contained not only Thy Flesh and Thy Blood, but also Thy Divinity and Thy Humanity. And although this mystery surpasses my understanding, I nevertheless believe it so firmly that I am ready to give my life and my blood in defense of its truth.

The tender mercies of the Sacred Heart that beat for us with such love in the Most Blessed Sacrament.

The effulgence of the Most Sacred Heart is poured out over us as a laver of redemption in the Sacred Tribunal of Penance as the merits of Its Most Precious Blood are washed over our hearts to sign the lintels of their doorposts, making them ready for a true and eternal passover at the moment of physical death to our life in eternity.

How can we refuse others the mercies that are given unto us so gratuitously?

How we can we refuse our acts of tender love in gratitude for as an exchange with the tender mercies of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus that was formed out of and beats as one with the Immaculate Heart of Mary?

A blessed Feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus to you all. May we know the tender mercies of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in life so that we can the eternal glories of the love of the Most Blessed Trinity in Heaven in the company of Our Lady, Saint Joseph, our Guardian Angels and Patron Saints and all of the saints and angels forever and ever!

Isn’t it time to pray a Rosary of reparation to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus through the Immaculate Heart of Mary?

Cor Jesu Sacratissimum, miserere nobis.

Cor Jesu Sacratissimum, miserere nobis.

Cor Jesu Sacratissimum, miserere nobis.

Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us.

Our Lady of Perpetual Help, pray for us.

Saint Joseph, pray for us.

Saints Peter and Paul, pray for us.

Saint John the Baptist, pray for us.

Saint John the Evangelist, pray for us.

Saint Michael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Gabriel the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Raphael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saints Joachim and Anne, pray for us.

Saints Caspar, Melchior and Balthasar, pray for us.

Enthroning the Heart of True, Unsurpassed Love In Our Homes

The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, that perfect fountain of unmatched love for us fallen creatures, was formed out of the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary. There is a perfect communion of love that exists for all eternity between these two Hearts, the One beating within the Body of the God-Man and the other beating within the body of His Most Blessed Mother. This simple, undeniable reality of the perfect communion between the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary teaches us the necessity of being totally consecrated to the latter as the path to being totally absorbed into the Mercy of the former. The path to take shelter in the Divine Mercy of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus runs through total consecration to the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary.

The Sacred Heart was pierced by Saint Longinus’s lance after Our Lord had breathed His last on the wood of the Holy Cross on Golgotha on Good Friday. Blood and water, the sacramental elements of the Church, flowed out from Our Lord’s pericardium through His Wounded Side onto the dirt of the earth of Calvary, dirt that would be brought back to Rome by Saint Helena and placed under the floor of the Church of Santa Croce in Gerusalemme. Our Lady’s Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart was pierced at that moment fully by the sword of sorrow that had been prophesied by the aged Simeon at the moment of her Purification in the Temple on February 2. The two Hearts rejoiced as one at Cana as Our Lord transformed water into wine. The two Hearts suffered as one on Calvary as Our Lord completed the first Mass by offering Himself up to the Father in Spirit and in Truth as propitiatory offering for our sins.

The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus is the repository of the infinite treasures of God’s ineffable mercy to us erring, ungrateful sinners. The Immaculate Heart of Mary is the instrument that pleads for us to have the humility necessary to approach the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus with contrition in the Sacred Tribunal of Penance and to make a firm purpose of amendment as we prepare to receive sacramental absolution for our sins and sanctifying grace to strengthen us to root out vice and to grow in sanctity. The Immaculate Heart of Mary pleads for us to receive Our Lord in Holy Communion, Wherein beats the Sacred Heart Itself, with greater fervor and devotion every day of our lives, keeping us mindful of the necessity of spending time with Our Beloved as that Heart of all hearts beats with fervor for our sanctification and our salvation in tabernacles even until the end of time. Yes, the occasion of the Feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus reminds us that there would be no Sacred Heart, no Incarnation of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity as Man, without Our Lady’s perfect fiat to the Father’s will at the moment of the Annunciation.

Total consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary teaches us to renew the pledge of consecration to the Most Sacred Heart, keeping in mind especially the promises Our Lord revealed to Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque concerning the keeping of the nine First Fridays. It is no accident that Our Lady added to devotion of the nine First Fridays a promise of assistance to those who fulfill the five First Saturdays by the observance of all of the conditions she established for the propagation of devotion to her Immaculate Heart, to which the cause of world peace itself has been entrusted by her Divine Son and which is pierced anew by the swords of sorrow thrust at it by the sins of ungrateful men. One who is totally consecrated to Our Lady’s Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart is thus able to offer up any and all merit gained by the fulfillment of the nine First Fridays as her consecrated slaves, leaving it to her to determine what share of that merit might be ours as we give unto her all of our liberty and all of the merit of whatever good actions we perform for the honor and glory of God and for the sanctification and salvation of souls, starting with own.

Our puny hearts, stained as they are by the effects of our sins and our selfishness, are so slow to comprehend the profundity of the perfect love that is expressed by the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary for us. We have no idea how much our sins and our ingratitude and our indifferences caused these hearts to suffer once in time on Calvary and how they continue to wound the Church Militant today. We can only hope and pray to live penitentially to offer our prayers and our sacrifices and acts of reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary so that we will come to fall so deeply in love with the Sacred Heart of Jesus that the thought of sin will become as repugnant to us as the effects of our sins was so unspeakably horrendous for these twin hearts.

One of the many, many ways in which we can make reparation for the coldness and ingratitude of our sin-stained hearts is to practice the Supernatural Virtue of Charity with everyone Our Lord puts into our lives. God’s love for us is an expression of His Divine Will, the ultimate end of which is the salvation of our immortal souls. In like manner, therefore, the love we have for others must be premised on willing their good, the ultimate end of which is the salvation of their immortal souls. We must do or say nothing that in any way makes it less possible for another human being to be saved as a member of the Church Our Lord founded upon the Rock of Peter, the Pope. We must be assiduous in our efforts to bring all people into the true Church–and to propagate to the best of our ability the fullness of the Faith that Our Lord has entrusted unto her without any taint of the errors and the novelties of the past forty years.

To do this, though, we must never be self-righteous or arrogant. We must understand that each of us is a work in progress, that God is attempting write straight with the crooked lines that are represented by our very own tortuous, willful lives.

Keeping this in mind will help us to be balanced and patient when explaining the state of our situation at present to those who are not yet ready to examine things as they really are, remembering that most of us (and I included myself here most especially) have re-discovered the Tradition of our youth precisely because others had the charity to confront us with the fullness of truth even though we may not have been ready to have received it with joy at that particular time. They prayed for us. They commended us to Our Lady’s Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart and through her beseeched her Divine Son’s Most Sacred Heart. And those who have always maintained the fullness of the Tradition of the Church without compromise must understand that it is precisely the fact that they have received special graces from the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus that they were able to persevere in all truth at a time when confusion reigned supreme. Such people have received countless, gratuitous graces that have been used by God to help others to join them in the small, wandering remnant of Catholics who are ostracized and belittled for keeping fast to everything that the Church taught, including its form of worship in the Roman Rite, prior to the apostasis and blasphemies and sacrileges of the past fifty years. We make whatever efforts we can with others, ultimately commending them to the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary and through it to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus with complete and utter confidence and without despairing one little bit of the results.

Moreover, we must remind ourselves on this great feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus that we are to forgive others as we ourselves are forgiven in the Sacrament of Penance, which is, ultimately, the hospital of Divine Mercy. Nothing anyone does to us is the equal of what one of our least venial sins caused Our Lord to suffer in His Sacred Humanity on the wood of the Holy Cross. Nothing anyone does to us or says about us causes us to suffer our sins caused Our Lady to suffer at the foot of the Cross on Good Friday and how they cause her to grieve so much in these our days. The words contained in the Pater Noster (Et dimitte nobis debita nostra, sicut et nos dimmitimus debitoribus nostris) bind us to act consistently as people who do indeed forgive others their sins against us as we are forgiven by God Himself through the actions and by the words of an alter Christus acting in persona Christi in the confessional. It is thus a grave sin against the Charity that is Incarnate in the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus to hold a grudge against others.

Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque was asked by her spiritual director, Blessed Claude de la Colombiere, to ask Our Lord during His next apparition to her what was the last sin she had confessed. This was designed to test the authenticity of Saint Margaret Mary’s claims that Our Lord was appearing to her to spread devotion to His Most Sacred Heart. “I forgot” was Our Lord’s answer to Sister Margaret Mary Alacoque. Saint Claude de la Colombiere knew as Saint Margaret Mary related that answer to her that Our Lord was indeed appearing to her. For although Our Lord knows all things as God, He wills to forget  our sins that are absolved in the Sacrament of Penance. Can we do any less? Any claim to be devoted to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and consecrated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary is false if we nurture grudges of any kind, petty or small, and if we do not make excuses for those who sin against us just as Our Lord made excuses for us, His executioners, as He hung on the wood of the Holy Cross. We must pray for the conversion of all men on a daily basis, starting with ourselves, hoping that there will be a happy reconciliation among all of the souls of the just in an unending Easter Sunday of glory in Heaven at least by the time of the General Judgment of the Living and of the Dead on the Last Day.

This great Feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, which was once observed universally as an octave in the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church, contains lessons that we can only hope to learn more about as with each passing year, especially by spending time in prayer before His Real Presence in the Most Blessed Sacrament. One of these lessons, though, is quite apposite: the consequences of failing to do that which Heaven asks of us to do.

That is, King Louis XIV and the bishops of France refused to consecrate the entirety of France to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus after entreaties from Sister Margaret Mary Alacoque that this consecrated had been willed by the God-Man Himself. The year was 1689, one hundred years before the outbreak of the French Revolution, which is still wreaking its horrid consequences in the world and in the Church today. How sad it is that Our Lady’s Fatima Message, given to Jacinta and Francisco  Marto and their cousin Lucia dos Santos on July 13, 1917, is ignored by so many.

One of the concrete ways that we can surround ourselves with the matchless love of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, united for all eternity to the most pure love of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, to which has been entrusted the cause of the Restoration of Christendom itself, is to Enthrone the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary in our homes. This act of Enthronement is truly essential. Why? Well, the kings of Christendom were enthroned before they entered solemnly upon their offices (even though they may have assumed actual power at a date before, sometimes significantly before, the actual enthronement/coronation ceremony). Thus, even though we may be sincerely devoted to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary, it is nevertheless important to formally acknowledge this fact in our homes, especially for the sake of our children. We must show the love of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus to our spouses and to our children (and to our parents and grandparents, if living, and to all of our relatives and friends). Visible images of this Enthronement help to remind us of the necessity to put aside petty disputes and disagreements and to love more purely with the Heart of Purity Itself.

You see, we are sensible beings. That is, we are influenced by the sights and sounds and smells (for those of you who, unlike me, have a sense of smell) that we encounter. Having visible images of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary in our homes, replete with a ceremony of enthronement, is a reminder to ourselves and our children that we must offer these twin hearts all of the love that we have, pledging to abstain from even the smallest of sins in order to please these hearts that wrought our salvation on Calvary and to make reparation for our own sins and those of the whole world. The images pasted below are found in several places in our own home, yes, the one on wheels that God has known from all eternity we would be blessed to have as we travel from place to place around the country:

                                              

There are many different formulae by which the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus may be enthroned in a family. Here is one:

 

The ceremony begins with the family gathering around the table on which is the Sacred Heart image, a statue or picture. This table is in another part of the room or in another room, some distance from where the image will be enthroned, to allow for a procession. Place flowers and candles on the mantel or place of honor.

 

•       If a priest presides he begins with the blessing of the image.
•       Priest: Our help is in the name of the Lord.
•      
All: And with thy spirit.
•       

Priest: Let us Pray: Almighty, everlasting God. Who approves the painting and sculpture of the images of Thy saints, so that as often as we gaze upon them we are reminded to imitate their deeds and sanctity: In Thy kindness we implore Thee to bless and sanctify this image made in honor and in memory of the most Sacred Heart of Thine only begotten Son, Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ; and grant that whosoever in its presence humbly strives to serve and honor the Sacred Heart of Thine only begotten Son, may obtain through His merits and intercession grace in this life and everlasting glory in the world to come. Amen

THE PRIEST HERE SPRINKLES THE IMAGE WITH HOLY WATER

 

•       

If there is no priest present, the father, accompanied by his wife and children (or, in his absence, the wife or the other representative of the family) place the image where it is enthroned.
•       All recite the Apostles Creed as an act of faith and reparation.
•       All stand for a Gospel reading. Suggested are: Luke 19: 1-10, or Luke 10: 38-42: or Luke 1: 23-33 . Then follows a short talk by the priest if he presides.
•       All kneel and say in unison the Act of Consecration

ACT OF CONSECRATION

•      
 O Sacred Heart of Jesus, * Who madest known to St. Margaret Mary Thy great desire to reign over Catholic Families, * we are gathereth here today * to proclaimest Thy complete dominion over our family. From now on we promise to leadeth a Christ like life: We willst striveth to develop in our home * all the virtues which bringeth with them the peace that  Thou promised. And we willst not compromiseth with the spirit of secularism * which Thou hast so strongly denounced.
•       Thou willst rulest over our minds through our deep and living faith. Thou willst be King of our hearts by our generous love for Thee; and we willst cultivate this love by the frequent reception of Thee in Holy Communion.
•       Divine Heart of Jesus * presideth over our family gatherings; bless all our family undertakings, both spiritual and temporal. Sanctify our joys and comfort us in our sorrows. And if any member of our family should hast the misfortune to offend Thee seriously, * remindest him, O Sacred Heart of Jesus, * of Thine infinite love and mercy for the penitent sinner.
•       And when the hour of separation cometh, * when death bringeth its sorrow into our family, * whether we goest or whether we stayeth, * we willst humbly accept Thy divine will . And at the same time we shalt consoleth and comforteth ourselves with the thought * that the time willst come when our whole family willst be united lovingly with Thee in heaven forever. There we shalt singeth a hymn of praise * to the infinite mercy and love of Thine Sacred Heart.
•       We asketh the Immaculate Heart of Mary and our glorious protector St. Joseph, * to offer Thee this family consecration of ours. May the memory of this consecration be with us always.
•       Glory be to the Divine Heart of Jesus, our King and our Father! Praise to the Divine Heart of Jesus that broughteth us our salvation. To it be honor and glory forever. Amen.
•       One Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be, for all absent members of the family, living and dead.

 

Pope Leo XIII, noting that he had been cured of a disease, at the age of eighty-nine, through his intercession to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, encouraged the practice of Consecration to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus in his encyclical letter, Annum Sacram, May 25, 1899.  It was Pope Leo, intent on restoring Christ as the King of all nations, who promulgated the Act of Consecration of the Human Race to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, explaining that everyone must be subjected to the reign of Christ the King, a reign that starts first in the hearts of individual souls and spreads from there into the entirety of nations and into each and every aspect of their cultures without any itsy bitsy exceptions whatsoever:

This world-wide and solemn testimony of allegiance and piety is especially appropriate to Jesus Christ, who is the Head and Supreme Lord of the race. His empire extends not only over Catholic nations and those who, having been duly washed in the waters of holy baptism, belong of right to the Church, although erroneous opinions keep them astray, or dissent from her teaching cuts them off from her care; it comprises also all those who are deprived of the Christian faith, so that the whole human race is most truly under the power of Jesus Christ. For He who is the Only-begotten Son of God the Father, having the same substance with Him and being the brightness of His glory and the figure of His substance (Hebrews i., 3) necessarily has everything in common with the Father, and therefore sovereign power over all things. This is why the Son of God thus speaks of Himself through the Prophet: “But I am appointed king by him over Sion, his holy mountain. . . The Lord said to me, Thou art my son, this day have I begotten thee. Ask of me and I will give thee the Gentiles for thy inheritance and the utmost parts of the earth for thy possession” (Psalm, ii.). By these words He declares that He has power from God over the whole Church, which is signified by Mount Sion, and also over the rest of the world to its uttermost ends. On what foundation this sovereign power rests is made sufficiently plain by the words, “Thou art My Son.” For by the very fact that He is the Son of the King of all, He is also the heir of all His Father’s power: hence the words – “I will give thee the Gentiles for thy inheritance,” which are similar to those used by Paul the Apostle, “whom he hath appointed heir of all things” (Hebrews i., 2).

But we should now give most special consideration to the declarations made by Jesus Christ, not through the Apostles or the Prophets but by His own words. To the Roman Governor who asked Him, “Art thou a king then?” He answered unhesitatingly, “Thou sayest that I am a king” John xviii. 37).And the greatness of this power and the boundlessness of His kingdom is still more clearly declared in these words to the Apostles: “All power is given to me in heaven and on earth” (Matthew xxviii., 18). If then all power has been given to Christ it follows of necessity that His empire must be supreme, absolute and independent of the will of any other, so that none is either equal or like unto it: and since it has been given in heaven and on earth it ought to have heaven and earth obedient to it. And verily he has acted on this extraordinary and peculiar right when He commanded His Apostles to preach His doctrine over the earth, to gather all men together into the one body of the Church by the baptism of salvation, and to bind them by laws, which no one could reject without risking his eternal salvation.

But this is not all. Christ reigns not only by natural right as the Son of God, but also by a right that He has acquired. For He it was who snatched us “from the power of darkness” (Colossians i., 13), and “gave Himself for the redemption of all” (I Timothy ii., 6). Therefore not only Catholics, and those who have duly received Christian baptism, but also all men, individually and collectively, have become to Him “a purchased people” (I Peter ii., 9). St. Augustine’s words are therefore to the point when he says: “You ask what price He paid? See what He gave and you will understand how much He paid. The price was the blood of Christ. What could cost so much but the whole world, and all its people? The great price He paid was paid for all” (T. 120 on St. John).

How it comes about that infidels themselves are subject to the power and dominion of Jesus Christ is clearly shown by St. Thomas, who gives us the reason and its explanation. For having put the question whether His judicial power extends to all men, and having stated that judicial authority flows naturally from royal authority, he concludes decisively as follows: “All things are subject to Christ as far as His power is concerned, although they are not all subject to Him in the exercise of that power” (3a., p., q. 59, a. 4). This sovereign power of Christ over men is exercised by truth, justice, and above all, by charity.

To this twofold ground of His power and domination He graciously allows us, if we think fit, to add voluntary consecration. Jesus Christ, our God and our Redeemer, is rich in the fullest and perfect possession of all things: we, on the other hand, are so poor and needy that we have nothing of our own to offer Him as a gift. But yet, in His infinite goodness and love, He in no way objects to our giving and consecrating to Him what is already His, as if it were really our own; nay, far from refusing such an offering, He positively desires it and asks for it: “My son, give me thy heart.” We are, therefore, able to be pleasing to Him by the good will and the affection of our soul. For by consecrating ourselves to Him we not only declare our open and free acknowledgment and acceptance of His authority over us, but we also testify that if what we offer as a gift were really our own, we would still offer it with our whole heart. We also beg of Him that He would vouchsafe to receive it from us, though clearly His own. Such is the efficacy of the act of which We speak, such is the meaning underlying Our words.

And since there is in the Sacred Heart a symbol and a sensible image of the infinite love of Jesus Christ which moves us to love one another,therefore is it fit and proper that we should consecrate ourselves to His most Sacred Heart – an act which is nothing else than an offering and a binding of oneself to Jesus Christ, seeing that whatever honor, veneration and love is given to this divine Heart is really and truly given to Christ Himself.

For these reasons We urge and exhort all who know and love this divine Heart willingly to undertake this act of piety; and it is Our earnest desire that all should make it on the same day, that so the aspirations of so many thousands who are performing this act of consecration may be borne to the temple of heaven on the same day. But shall We allow to slip from Our remembrance those innumerable others upon whom the light of Christian truth has not yet shined? We hold the place of Him who came to save that which was lost, and who shed His blood for the salvation of the whole human race. And so We greatly desire to bring to the true life those who sit in the shadow of death. As we have already sent messengers of Christ over the earth to instruct them, so now, in pity for their lot with all Our soul we commend them, and as far as in us lies We consecrate them to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. In this way this act of devotion, which We recommend, will be a blessing to all. For having performed it, those in whose hearts are the knowledge and love of Jesus Christ will feel that faith and love increased. Those who knowing Christ, yet neglect His law and its precepts, may still gain from His Sacred Heart the flame of charity. And lastly, for those still more unfortunate, who are struggling in the darkness of superstition, we shall all with one mind implore the assistance of heaven that Jesus Christ, to whose power they are subject,may also one day render them submissive to its exercise; and that not only in the life to come when He will fulfil His will upon all men, by saving some and punishing others, (St. Thomas, ibid), but also in this mortal life by giving them faith and holiness. May they by these virtues strive to honor God as they ought, and to win everlasting happiness in heaven.

Such an act of consecration, since it can establish or draw tighter the bonds which naturally connect public affairs with God, gives to States a hope of better things. In these latter times especially, a policy has been followed which has resulted in a sort of wall being raised between the Church and civil society. In the constitution and administration of States the authority of sacred and divine law is utterly disregarded, with a view to the exclusion of religion from having any constant part in public life. This policy almost tends to the removal of the Christian faith from our midst, and, if that were possible, of the banishment of God Himself from the earth. When men’s minds are raised to such a height of insolent pride, what wonder is it that the greater part of the human race should have fallen into such disquiet of mind and be buffeted by waves so rough that no one is suffered to be free from anxiety and peril? When religion is once discarded it follows of necessity that the surest foundations of the public welfare must give way, whilst God, to inflict on His enemies the punishment they so richly deserve, has left them the prey of their own evil desires, so that they give themselves up to their passions and finally wear themselves out by excess of liberty.

Hence that abundance of evils which have now for a long time settled upon the world, and which pressingly call upon us to seek for help from Him by whose strength alone they can be driven away. Who can He be but Jesus Christ the Only-begotten Son of God? “For there is no other name under heaven given to men whereby we must be saved” (Acts iv., 12). We must have recourse to Him who is the Way, the Truth and the Life. We have gone astray and we must return to the right path: darkness has overshadowed our minds, and the gloom must be dispelled by the light of truth: death has seized upon us, and we must lay hold of life. It will at length be possible that our many wounds be healed and all justice spring forth again with the hope of restored authority; that the splendors of peace be renewed, and swords and arms drop from the hand when all men shall acknowledge the empire of Christ and willingly obey His word, and “Every tongue shall confess that our Lord Jesus Christ is in the glory of God the Father” (Philippians ii, II).

When the Church, in the days immediately succeeding her institution, was oppressed beneath the yoke of the Caesars, a young Emperor saw in the heavens a cross, which became at once the happy omen and cause of the glorious victory that soon followed. And now, today, behold another blessed and heavenly token is offered to our sight – the most Sacred Heart of Jesus, with a cross rising from it and shining forth with dazzling splendor amidst flames of love. In that Sacred Heart all our hopes should be placed, and from it the salvation of men is to be confidently besought. (Pope Leo XIII, Annum Sacram, May 25, 1899.)

Pope Pius XI amplified the concerns of Pope Leo, instituting an Act of Reparation to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, appended below, in his encyclical letter, Miserentissimus Redemptor, May 8, 1928, expressed our need to make reparations for our own sins and those of the whole world, especially in light of how even Catholics had abandoned the cause of Christ the King to embrace various philosophies and ideologies that have convinced men that they can create the “better world” without subordinating all of their actions, public and private, at all times to the Catholic Faith:

Among the many proofs of the boundless benignity of our Redeemer, there is one that stands out conspicuously, to wit the fact that when the charity of Christian people was growing cold, the Divine Charity itself was set forth to be honored by a special worship, and the riches of its bounty was made widely manifest by that form of devotion wherein worship is given to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, “In whom are hid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Coloss. ii, 3). For as in olden time when mankind came forth from Noe’s ark, God set His “bow in the clouds” (Genesis ix, 13), shining as the sign of a friendly covenant; so in the most turbulent times of a more recent age, when the Jansenist heresy, the most crafty of them all, hostile to love and piety towards God, was creeping in and preaching that God was not to be loved as a father but rather to be feared as an implacable judge; then the most benign Jesus showed his own most Sacred Heart to the nations lifted up as a standard of peace and charity portending no doubtful victory in the combat. And indeed Our Predecessor of happy memory, Leo Xlll, admiring the timely opportuneness of the devotion to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, said very aptly in his Encyclical Letter, “Annum Sacrum,” “When in the days near her origin, the Church was oppressed under the yoke of the Caesars the Cross shown on high to the youthful Emperor was at once an omen and a cause of the victory that speedily followed. And here today another most auspicious and most divine sign is offered to our sight, to wit the most Sacred Heart of Jesus, with a Cross set above it shining with most resplendent brightness in the midst of flames. Herein must all hopes be set, from hence must the salvation of men be sought and expected.

And rightly indeed is that said, Venerable Brethren. For is not the sum of all religion and therefore the pattern of more perfect life, contained in that most auspicious sign and in the form of piety that follows from it inasmuch as it more readily leads the minds of men to an intimate knowledge of Christ Our Lord, and more efficaciously moves their hearts to love Him more vehemently and to imitate Him more closely? It is no wonder, therefore, that Our Predecessors have constantly defended this most approved form of devotion from the censures of calumniators, and have extolled it with high praise and promoted it very zealously, as the needs of time and circumstance demanded. Moreover, by the inspiration of God’s grace, it has come to pass that the pious devotion of the faithful towards the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus has made great increase in the course of time; hence pious confraternities to promote the worship of the Divine Heart are everywhere erected, hence too the custom of receiving Holy Communion on the first Friday of every month at the desire of Christ Jesus, a custom which now prevails everywhere.

But assuredly among those things which properly pertain to the worship of the Most Sacred Heart, a special place must be given to that Consecration, whereby we devote ourselves and all things that are ours to the Divine Heart of Jesus, acknowledging that we have received all things from the everlasting love of God. When Our Savior had taught Margaret Mary, the most innocent disciple of His Heart, how much He desired that this duty of devotion should be rendered to him by men, moved in this not so much by His own right as by His immense charity for us; she herself, with her spiritual father, Claude de la Colombiere, rendered it the first of all. Thereafter followed, in the course of time, individual men, then private families and associations, and lastly civil magistrates, cities and kingdoms. But since in the last century, and in this present century, things have come to such a pass, that by the machinations of wicked men the sovereignty of Christ Our Lord has been denied and war is publicly waged against the Church, by passing laws and promoting plebiscites repugnant to Divine and natural law, nay more by holding assemblies of them that cry out, “We will not have this man to reign over us” (Luke xix, 14): from the aforesaid Consecration there burst forth over against them in keenest opposition the voice of all the clients of the Most Sacred Heart, as it were one voice, to vindicate His glory and to assert His rights: “Christ must reign” (1 Corinthians xv, 25); “Thy kingdom come” (Matth. vi, 10). From this at length it happily came to pass that at the beginning of this century the whole human race which Christ, in whom all things are re-established (Ephes. i, 10), possesses by native right as His own, was dedicated to the same Most Sacred Heart, with the applause of the whole Christian world, by Our Predecessor of happy memory, Leo Xlll.

Now these things so auspiciously and happily begun as we taught in Our Encyclical Letter “Quas primas,” we Ourselves, consenting to very many long-continued desires and prayers of Bishops and people, brought to completion and perfected, by God’s grace, when at the close of the Jubilee Year, We instituted the Feast of Christ the King of All, to be solemnly celebrated throughout the whole Christian world. Now when we did this, not only did we set in a clear light that supreme sovereignty which Christ holds over the whole universe, over civil and domestic society, and over individual men, but at the same time we anticipated the joys of that most auspicious day, whereon the whole world will gladly and willingly render obedience to the most sweet lordship of Christ the King. For this reason, We decreed at the same time that this same Consecration should be renewed every year on the occasion of that appointed festal day, so that the fruit of this same Consecration might be obtained more certainly and more abundantly, and all peoples might be joined together in Christian charity and in the reconciliation of peace, in the Heart of the King of kings and Lord of lords.

But to all these duties, more especially to that fruitful Consecration which was in a manner confirmed by the sacred solemnity of Christ the King, something else must needs be added, and it is concerning this that it is our pleasure to speak with you more at length, Venerable Brethren, on the present occasion: we mean that duty of honorable satisfaction or reparation which must be rendered to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus. For if the first and foremost thing in Consecration is this, that the creature’s love should be given in return for the love of the Creator, another thing follows from this at once, namely that to the same uncreated Love, if so be it has been neglected by forgetfulness or violated by offense, some sort of compensation must be rendered for the injury, and this debt is commonly called by the name of reparation.

Now though in both these matters we are impelled by quite the same motives, none the less we are holden to the duty of reparation and expiation by a certain more valid title of justice and of love, of justice indeed, in order that the offense offered to God by our sins may be expiated and that the violated order may be repaired by penance: and of love too so that we may suffer together with Christ suffering and “filled with reproaches” (Lam. iii, 30), and for all our poverty may offer Him some little solace. For since we are all sinners and laden with many faults, our God must be honored by us not only by that worship wherewith we adore His infinite Majesty with due homage, or acknowledge His supreme dominion by praying, or praise His boundless bounty by thanksgiving; but besides this we must need make satisfaction to God the just avenger, “for our numberless sins and offenses and negligences.” To Consecration, therefore, whereby we are devoted to God and are called holy to God, by that holiness and stability which, as the Angelic Doctor teaches, is proper to consecration (2a. 2ae. qu. 81, a. 8. c.), there must be added expiation, whereby sins are wholly blotted out, lest the holiness of the supreme justice may punish our shameless unworthiness, and reject our offering as hateful rather than accept it as pleasing.

Moreover this duty of expiation is laid upon the whole race of men since, as we are taught by the Christian faith, after Adam’s miserable fall, infected by hereditary stain, subject to concupiscences and most wretchedly depraved, it would have been thrust down into eternal destruction. This indeed is denied by the wise men of this age of ours, who following the ancient error of Pelagius, ascribe to human nature a certain native virtue by which of its own force it can go onward to higher things; but the Apostle rejects these false opinions of human pride, admonishing us that we “were by nature children of wrath” (Ephesians ii, 3). And indeed, even from the beginning, men in a manner acknowledged this common debt of expiation and, led by a certain natural instinct, they endeavored to appease God by public sacrifices.

But no created power was sufficient to expiate the sins of men, if the Son of God had not assumed man’s nature in order to redeem it. This, indeed, the Savior of men Himself declared by the mouth of the sacred Psalmist: “Sacrifice and oblation thou wouldest not: but a body thou hast fitted to me: Holocausts for sin did not please thee: then said 1: Behold I come” (Hebrews x, 5-7). And in very deed, “Surely He hath borne our infirmities, and carried our sorrows. . . He was wounded for our iniquities (Isaias liii, 4-5), and He His own self bore our sins in His body upon the tree . . . (1 Peter ii, 24), “Blotting out the handwriting of the decree that was against us, which was contrary to us. And He has taken the same out of the way, fastening it to the cross . . .” (Colossians ii, 14) “that we being dead to sins, should live to justice” (1 Peter ii, 24). Yet, though the copious redemption of Christ has abundantly forgiven us all offenses (Cf. Colossians ii, 13), nevertheless, because of that wondrous divine dispensation whereby those things that are wanting of the sufferings of Christ are to be filled up in our flesh for His body which is the Church (Cf. Colossians i, 24), to the praises and satisfactions, “which Christ in the name of sinners rendered unto God” we can also add our praises and satisfactions, and indeed it behooves us so to do. But we must ever remember that the whole virtue of the expiation depends on the one bloody sacrifice of Christ, which without intermission of time is renewed on our altars in an unbloody manner, “For the victim is one and the same, the same now offering by the ministry of priests, who then offered Himself on the cross, the manner alone of offering being different” (Council of Trent, Session XXIII, Chapter 2). Wherefore with this most august Eucharistic Sacrifice there ought to be joined an oblation both of the ministers and of all the faithful, so that they also may “present themselves living sacrifices, holy, pleasing unto God” (Romans xii, 1). Nay more, St. Cyprian does not hesitate to affirm that “the Lord’s sacrifice is not celebrated with legitimate sanctification, unless our oblation and sacrifice correspond to His passion” (Ephesians 63). For this reason, the Apostle admonishes us that “bearing about in our body the mortification of Jesus” (2 Corinthians iv, 10), and buried together with Christ, and planted together in the likeness of His death (Cf. Romans vi, 4-5), we must not only crucify our flesh with the vices and concupiscences (Cf. Galatians v, 24), “flying the corruption of that concupiscence which is in the world” (2 Peter i, 4), but “that the life also of Jesus may be made manifest in our bodies” (2 Corinthians iv, 10) and being made partakers of His eternal priesthood we are to offer up “gifts and sacrifices for sins” (Hebrews v, 1). Nor do those only enjoy a participation in this mystic priesthood and in the office of satisfying and sacrificing, whom our Pontiff Christ Jesus uses as His ministers to offer up the clean oblation to God’s Name in every place from the rising of the sun to the going down (Malachias i, 11), but the whole Christian people rightly called by the Prince of the Apostles “a chosen generation, a kingly priesthood” (1 Peter ii, 9), ought to offer for sins both for itself and for all mankind (Cf. Hebrews v, 3), in much the same manner as every priest and pontiff “taken from among men, is ordained for men in the things that appertain to God” (Hebrews v, 1).

But the more perfectly that our oblation and sacrifice corresponds to the sacrifice of Our Lord, that is to say, the more perfectly we have immolated our love and our desires and have crucified our flesh by that mystic crucifixion of which the Apostle speaks, the more abundant fruits of that propitiation and expiation shall we receive for ourselves and for others. For there is a wondrous and close union of all the faithful with Christ, such as that which prevails between the head and the other members; moreover by that mystic Communion of Saints which we profess in the Catholic creed, both individual men and peoples are joined together not only with one another but also with him, “who is the head, Christ; from whom the whole body, being compacted and fitly joined together, by what every joint supplieth, according to the operation in the measure of every part, maketh increase of the body unto the edifying of itself in charity” (Ephesians iv, 15-16). It was this indeed that the Mediator of God and men, Christ Jesus, when He was near to death, asked of His Father: “I in them, and thou in me: that they may be made perfect in one” (John xvii, 23).

Wherefore, even as consecration proclaims and confirms this union with Christ, so does expiation begin that same union by washing away faults, and perfect it by participating in the sufferings of Christ, and consummate it by offering victims for the brethren. And this indeed was the purpose of the merciful Jesus, when He showed His Heart to us bearing about it the symbols of the passion and displaying the flames of love, that from the one we might know the infinite malice of sin, and in the other we might admire the infinite charity of Our Redeemer, and so might have a more vehement hatred of sin, and make a more ardent return of love for His love.

And truly the spirit of expiation or reparation has always had the first and foremost place in the worship given to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, and nothing is more in keeping with the origin, the character, the power, and the distinctive practices of this form of devotion, as appears from the record of history and custom, as well as from the sacred liturgy and the acts of the Sovereign Pontiffs. For when Christ manifested Himself to Margaret Mary, and declared to her the infinitude of His love, at the same time, in the manner of a mourner, He complained that so many and such great injuries were done to Him by ungrateful men — and we would that these words in which He made this complaint were fixed in the minds of the faithful, and were never blotted out by oblivion: “Behold this Heart” — He said — “which has loved men so much and has loaded them with all benefits, and for this boundless love has had no return but neglect, and contumely, and this often from those who were bound by a debt and duty of a more special love.” In order that these faults might be washed away, He then recommended several things to be done, and in particular the following as most pleasing to Himself, namely that men should approach the Altar with this purpose of expiating sin, making what is called a Communion of Reparation, — and that they should likewise make expiatory supplications and prayers, prolonged for a whole hour, –which is rightly called the “Holy Hour.” These pious exercises have been approved by the Church and have also been enriched with copious indulgences.

But how can these rites of expiation bring solace now, when Christ is already reigning in the beatitude of Heaven? To this we may answer in some words of St. Augustine which are very apposite here, –“Give me one who loves, and he will understand what I say” (In Johannis evangelium, tract. XXVI, 4). For any one who has great love of God, if he will look back through the tract of past time may dwell in meditation on Christ, and see Him laboring for man, sorrowing, suffering the greatest hardships, “for us men and for our salvation,” well-nigh worn out with sadness, with anguish, nay “bruised for our sins” (Isaias liii, 5), and healing us by His bruises. And the minds of the pious meditate on all these things the more truly, because the sins of men and their crimes committed in every age were the cause why Christ was delivered up to death, and now also they would of themselves bring death to Christ, joined with the same griefs and sorrows, since each several sin in its own way is held to renew the passion of Our Lord: “Crucifying again to themselves the Son of God, and making him a mockery” (Hebrews vi, 6). Now if, because of our sins also which were as yet in the future, but were foreseen, the soul of Christ became sorrowful unto death, it cannot be doubted that then, too, already He derived somewhat of solace from our reparation, which was likewise foreseen, when “there appeared to Him an angel from heaven” (Luke xxii, 43), in order that His Heart, oppressed with weariness and anguish, might find consolation. And so even now, in a wondrous yet true manner, we can and ought to console that Most Sacred Heart which is continually wounded by the sins of thankless men, since –as we also read in the sacred liturgy — Christ Himself, by the mouth of the Psalmist complains that He is forsaken by His friends: “My Heart hath expected reproach and misery, and I looked for one that would grieve together with me, but there was none: and for one that would comfort me, and I found none” (Psalm Ixviii, 21).

To this it may be added that the expiatory passion of Christ is renewed and in a manner continued and fulfilled in His mystical body, which is the Church. For, to use once more the words of St. Augustine, “Christ suffered whatever it behooved Him to suffer; now nothing is wanting of the measure of the sufferings. Therefore the sufferings were fulfilled, but in the head; there were yet remaining the sufferings of Christ in His body” (In Psalm Ixxxvi). This, indeed, Our Lord Jesus Himself vouchsafed to explain when, speaking to Saul, “as yet breathing out threatenings and slaughter” (Acts ix, 1), He said, “I am Jesus whom thou persecutest” (Acts ix, 5), clearly signifying that when persecutions are stirred up against the Church, the Divine Head of the Church is Himself attacked and troubled. Rightly, therefore, does Christ, still suffering in His mystical body, desire to have us partakers of His expiation, and this is also demanded by our intimate union with Him, for since we are “the body of Christ and members of member” (1 Corinthians xii, 27), whatever the head suffers, all the members must suffer with it (Cf. 1 Corinthians xii, 26).

Now, how great is the necessity of this expiation or reparation, more especially in this our age, will be manifest to every one who, as we said at the outset, will examine the world, “seated in wickedness” (1 John v, 19), with his eyes and with his mind. For from all sides the cry of the peoples who are mourning comes up to us, and their princes or rulers have indeed stood up and met together in one against the Lord and against His Church (Cf. Psalm ii, 2). Throughout those regions indeed, we see that all rights both human and Divine are confounded. Churches are thrown down and overturned, religious men and sacred virgins are torn from their homes and are afflicted with abuse, with barbarities, with hunger and imprisonment; bands of boys and girls are snatched from the bosom of their mother the Church, and are induced to renounce Christ, to blaspheme and to attempt the worst crimes of lust; the whole Christian people, sadly disheartened and disrupted, are continually in danger of falling away from the faith, or of suffering the most cruel death. These things in truth are so sad that you might say that such events foreshadow and portend the “beginning of sorrows,” that is to say of those that shall be brought by the man of sin, “who is lifted up above all that is called God or is worshipped” (2 Thessalonians ii, 4).

But it is yet more to be lamented, Venerable Brethren, that among the faithful themselves, washed in Baptism with the blood of the immaculate Lamb, and enriched with grace, there are found so many men of every class, who laboring under an incredible ignorance of Divine things and infected with false doctrines, far from their Father’s home, lead a life involved in vices, a life which is not brightened by the light of true faith, nor gladdened by the hope of future beatitude, nor refreshed and cherished by the fire of charity; so that they truly seem to sit in darkness and in the shadow of death. Moreover, among the faithful there is a greatly increasing carelessness of ecclesiastical discipline, and of those ancient institutions on which all Christian life rests, by which domestic society is governed, and the sanctity of marriage is safeguarded; the education of children is altogether neglected, or else it is depraved by too indulgent blandishments, and the Church is even robbed of the power of giving the young a Christian education; there is a sad forgetfulness of Christian modesty especially in the life and the dress of women; there is an unbridled cupidity of transitory things, a want of moderation in civic affairs, an unbounded ambition of popular favor, a depreciation of legitimate authority, and lastly a contempt for the word of God, whereby faith itself is injured, or is brought into proximate peril.

But all these evils as it were culminate in the cowardice and the sloth of those who, after the manner of the sleeping and fleeing disciples, wavering in their faith, miserably forsake Christ when He is oppressed by anguish or surrounded by the satellites of Satan, and in the perfidy of those others who following the example of the traitor Judas, either partake of the holy table rashly and sacrilegiously, or go over to the camp of the enemy. And thus, even against our will, the thought rises in the mind that now those days draw near of which Our Lord prophesied: “And because iniquity hath abounded, the charity of many shall grow cold” (Matth. xxiv, 12).

Now, whosoever of the faithful have piously pondered on all these things must need be inflamed with the charity of Christ in His agony and make a more vehement endeavor to expiate their own faults and those of others, to repair the honor of Christ, and to promote the eternal salvation of souls. And indeed that saying of the Apostle: “Where sin abounded, grace did more abound” (Romans v, 20) may be used in a manner to describe this present age; for while the wickedness of men has been greatly increased, at the same time, by the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, a marvelous increase has been made in the number of the faithful of both sexes who with eager mind endeavor to make satisfaction for the many injuries offered to the Divine Heart, nay more they do not hesitate to offer themselves to Christ as victims. For indeed if any one will lovingly dwell on those things of which we have been speaking, and will have them deeply fixed in his mind, it cannot be but he will shrink with horror from all sin as from the greatest evil, and more than this he will yield himself wholly to the will of God, and will strive to repair the injured honor of the Divine Majesty, as well by constantly praying, as by voluntary mortifications, by patiently bearing the afflictions that befall him, and lastly by spending his whole life in this exercise of expiation.

And for this reason also there have been established many religious families of men and women whose purpose it is by earnest service, both by day and by night, in some manner to fulfill the office of the Angel consoling Jesus in the garden; hence come certain associations of pious men, approved by the Apostolic See and enriched with indulgences, who take upon themselves this same duty of making expiation, a duty which is to be fulfilled by fitting exercises of devotion and of the virtues; hence lastly, to omit other things, come the devotions and solemn demonstrations for the purpose of making reparation to the offended Divine honor, which are inaugurated everywhere, not only by pious members of the faithful, but by parishes, dioceses and cities.

These things being so, Venerable Brethren, just as the rite of consecration, starting from humble beginnings, and afterwards more widely propagated, was at length crowned with success by Our confirmation; so in like manner, we earnestly desire that this custom of expiation or pious reparation, long since devoutly introduced and devoutly propagated, may also be more firmly sanctioned by Our Apostolic authority and more solemnly celebrated by the whole Catholic name. Wherefore, we decree and command that every year on the Feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, — which feast indeed on this occasion we have ordered to be raised to the degree of a double of the first class with an octave — in all churches throughout the whole world, the same expiatory prayer or protestation as it is called, to Our most loving Savior, set forth in the same words according to the copy subjoined to this letter shall be solemnly recited, so that all our faults may be washed away with tears, and reparation may be made for the violated rights of Christ the supreme King and Our most loving Lord.

There is surely no reason for doubting, Venerable Brethren, that from this devotion piously established and commanded to the whole Church, many excellent benefits will flow forth not only to individual men but also to society, sacred, civil, and domestic, seeing that our Redeemer Himself promised to Margaret Mary that “all those who rendered this honor to His Heart would be endowed with an abundance of heavenly graces.” Sinners indeed, looking on Him whom they pierced (John xix, 37), moved by the sighs and tears of the whole Church, by grieving for the injuries offered to the supreme King, will return to the heart (Isaias xlvi, 8), lest perchance being hardened in their faults, when they see Him whom they pierced “coming in the clouds of heaven” (Matth. xxvi, 64), too late and in vain they shall bewail themselves because of Him (Cf. Apoc. i, 7). But the just shall be justified and shall be sanctified still (Cf. Apoc. xxii. 11) and they will devote themselves wholly and with new ardor to the service of their King, when they see Him contemned and attacked and assailed with so many and such great insults, but more than all will they burn with zeal for the eternal salvation of souls when they have pondered on the complaint of the Divine Victim: “What profit is there in my blood?” (Psalm xxix, 10), and likewise on the joy that will be felt by the same Most Sacred Heart of Jesus “upon one sinner doing penance” (Luke xv, 10). And this indeed we more especially and vehemently desire and confidently expect, that the just and merciful God who would have spared Sodom for the sake of ten just men, will much more be ready to spare the whole race of men, when He is moved by the humble petitions and happily appeased by the prayers of the community of the faithful praying together in union with Christ their Mediator and Head, in the name of all. And now lastly may the most benign Virgin Mother of God smile on this purpose and on these desires of ours; for since she brought forth for us Jesus our Redeemer, and nourished Him, and offered Him as a victim by the Cross, by her mystic union with Christ and His very special grace she likewise became and is piously called a reparatress. Trusting in her intercession with Christ, who whereas He is the “one mediator of God and men” (1 Timothy ii, 5), chose to make His Mother the advocate of sinners, and the minister and mediatress of grace, as an earnest of heavenly gifts and as a token of Our paternal affection we most lovingly impart the Apostolic Blessing to you, Venerable Brethren, and to all the flock committed to your care. (Pope Pius XI, Miserentissimus Redemptor, May 8, 1928.)

Note, please, once again this particular paragraph from Pope Pius XI’s Miserentissimus Redemptor, which even more applicable today than when it was written eighty-five years ago:

But all these evils as it were culminate in the cowardice and the sloth of those who, after the manner of the sleeping and fleeing disciples, wavering in their faith, miserably forsake Christ when He is oppressed by anguish or surrounded by the satellites of Satan, and in the perfidy of those others who following the example of the traitor Judas, either partake of the holy table rashly and sacrilegiously, or go over to the camp of the enemy. And thus, even against our will, the thought rises in the mind that now those days draw near of which Our Lord prophesied: “And because iniquity hath abounded, the charity of many shall grow cold” (Matth. xxiv, 12). (Pope Pius XI, Miserentissimus Redemptor, May 8, 1928.)

We can never abandon the cause of Christ the King and Mary our Immaculate Queen, which is why we must enthrone these twin Hearts of love in our homes so that they can pulsate through every aspect of every nation in the world. Keep in mind these stirring words of Pope Pius XI in Ubi Arcano Dei Consilio, December 23, 1922:

There exists an institution able to safeguard the sanctity of the law of nations. This institution is a part of every nation; at the same time it is above all nations. She enjoys, too, the highest authority, the fullness of the teaching power of the Apostles. Such an institution is the Church of Christ. She alone is adapted to do this great work, for she is not only divinely commissioned to lead mankind, but moreover, because of her very make-up and the constitution which she possesses, by reason of her age-old traditions and her great prestige, which has not been lessened but has been greatly increased since the close of the War, cannot but succeed in such a venture where others assuredly will fail.

It is apparent from these considerations that true peace, the peace of Christ, is impossible unless we are willing and ready to accept the fundamental principles of Christianity, unless we are willing to observe the teachings and obey the law of Christ, both in public and private life. If this were done, then society being placed at last on a sound foundation, the Church would be able, in the exercise of its divinely given ministry and by means of the teaching authority which results therefrom, to protect all the rights of God over men and nations.

It is possible to sum up all We have said in one word, “the Kingdom of Christ.” For Jesus Christ reigns over the minds of individuals by His teachings, in their hearts by His love, in each one’s life by the living according to His law and the imitating of His example. Jesus reigns over the family when it, modeled after the holy ideals of the sacrament of matrimony instituted by Christ, maintains unspotted its true character of sanctuary. In such a sanctuary of love, parental authority is fashioned after the authority of God, the Father, from Whom, as a matter of fact, it originates and after which even it is named. (Ephesians iii, 15) The obedience of the children imitates that of the Divine Child of Nazareth, and the whole family life is inspired by the sacred ideals of the Holy Family. Finally, Jesus Christ reigns over society when men recognize and reverence the sovereignty of Christ, when they accept the divine origin and control over all social forces, a recognition which is the basis of the right to command for those in authority and of the duty to obey for those who are subjects, a duty which cannot but ennoble all who live up to its demands. Christ reigns where the position in society which He Himself has assigned to His Church is recognized, for He bestowed on the Church the status and the constitution of a society which, by reason of the perfect ends which it is called upon to attain, must be held to be supreme in its own sphere; He also made her the depository and interpreter of His divine teachings, and, by consequence, the teacher and guide of every other society whatsoever, not of course in the sense that she should abstract in the least from their authority, each in its own sphere supreme, but that she should really perfect their authority, just as divine grace perfects human nature, and should give to them the assistance necessary for men to attain their true final end, eternal happiness, and by that very fact make them the more deserving and certain promoters of their happiness here below. (Pope Pius XI, Ubi Aranco Dei Consilio, December 23, 1922.)

Pope Pius XI reiterated these themes in Quas Primas, December 11, 1925, the encyclical letter that institute the Feast of the Universal Kingship of Jesus Christ, a Kingship that starts in our own homes:

Nations will be reminded by the annual celebration of this feast that not only private individuals but also rulers and princes are bound to give public honor and obedience to Christ. It will call to their minds the thought of the last judgment, wherein Christ, who has been cast out of public life, despised, neglected and ignored, will most severely avenge these insults; for his kingly dignity demands that the State should take account of the commandments of God and of Christian principles, both in making laws and in administering justice, and also in providing for the young a sound moral education.

The faithful, moreover, by meditating upon these truths, will gain much strength and courage, enabling them to form their lives after the true Christian ideal. If to Christ our Lord is given all power in heaven and on earth; if all men, purchased by his precious blood, are by a new right subjected to his dominion; if this power embraces all men, it must be clear that not one of our faculties is exempt from his empire. He must reign in our minds, which should assent with perfect submission and firm belief to revealed truths and to the doctrines of Christ. He must reign in our wills, which should obey the laws and precepts of God. He must reign in our hearts, which should spurn natural desires and love God above all things, and cleave to him alone. He must reign in our bodies and in our members, which should serve as instruments for the interior sanctification of our souls, or to use the words of the Apostle Paul, as instruments of justice unto God. If all these truths are presented to the faithful for their consideration, they will prove a powerful incentive to perfection. It is Our fervent desire, Venerable Brethren, that those who are without the fold may seek after and accept the sweet yoke of Christ, and that we, who by the mercy of God are of the household of the faith, may bear that yoke, not as a burden but with joy, with love, with devotion; that having lived our lives in accordance with the laws of God’s kingdom, we may receive full measure of good fruit, and counted by Christ good and faithful servants, we may be rendered partakers of eternal bliss and glory with him in his heavenly kingdom. (Pope Pius XI, Quas Primas, December 11, 1925.)

We must be serious about making Christ the King of our hearts so that He can reign, along with His Queen Mother, as the King and center of all men and all nations at all times until the end of the world. Anyone who thinks we can retard the evils of the day by keeping silence about Our Lord and His Social Kingship is a fool. We cannot fight secularism with secularism of any strip. We can only fight secularism with Catholicism, which is the sole foundation of personal and social order.

We rejoice today in the fact that we are loved with an unmerited love that is beyond our comprehension. With true and deep sorrow for our many sins but with a firm confidence in the ineffable Mercy of the Divine Redeemer that is contained in His Most Sacred Heart, may we never take this love for granted, flying unto the patronage of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, she who is the Queen of All of the Saints, to help us drink always from the fountain of love that is the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus now and unto eternity.

Have a blessed and glorious feast day of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus.

Cor Jesu Sacratissimum, miserere nobis.

Cor Jesu Sacratissimum, miserere nobis.

Cor Jesu Sacratissimum, miserere nobis.

Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us.

Saint Joseph, pray for us.

Saints Peter and Paul, pray for us.

Saint John the Baptist, pray for us.

Saint Michael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Gabriel the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Raphael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saints Joachim and Anne, pray for us.

Saints Caspar, Melchior, and Balthasar, pray for us.

A New Sense For A New Faith, part one

Although the number of people who will wind up reading the latest revolutionary document  from the International Theological Commission, Sensus Fidei: In the Life of the Church, will probably wind up being lower than those who read the articles on this site, it is perhaps useful to devote a little time to this latest effort on the part of the conciliar revolutionaries to provide theological justification for their Modernist presuppositions and prescriptions.

Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI spent a good deal of time during false “pontificate” seeking to “stabilize” the conciliar revolution by his infamous, philosophically absurd and dogmatically condemned “hermeneutic of continuity,” which was nothing more and nothing less than Modernism’s “evolution of dogma” that had been presented to us by Wojtyla/John Paul II as “living tradition” (Deft? Daft Is More Like It, part two). Ratzinger/Benedict gave his “papal” imprimatur to supposedly “unofficial” documents issued by the International Theological Commission and the Joint International Commission for the Theological Dialogue Between the Conciliar Church and the Orthodox Church while using his general audience addresses to deconstruct and misrepresent the teachings and the lives of very Saints and Doctors to make them perjured witnesses in behalf of conciliarism. And this is to say nothing of his “unofficial” books issued during the time he served as the head of the counterfeit church of conciliarism.

It is only natural for the conciliar revolutionaries to seek to provide some kind of theological justification for their revolution by misrepresenting, deconstructing and corrupting the true meaning of the sensus fidei, that supernatural sense of the Holy Faith by which members of the Church Militant are able to distinguish that which is in accord with the Holy Faith from that which is not.

The theological justification found in Sensus fidei in the life of the Church represents nothing other than a transparent effort, no matter how “unofficial” (although it was signed by the conciliar prefect of the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, the arch-heretic named Gerhard Ludwig Muller), to prepare the way for the Instrumentum Laboris that is to be released today, Thursday, June 26, 2014, the Octave of the Solemnity of Corpus Christi and the Commemoration of Saints John and Paul, and its revolutionary program for the upcoming “Extraordinary Synod on the Family. As noted in Jorge Cooks the Books two months ago now, the upcoming hootenanny in Rome will sanction the administration of what purports to be Holy Communion to civilly divorced and remarried Catholics who lack even the fig leaf of a conciliar decree of nullity and to provide a foundation for providing the liturgical invalid sacramental rites of the counterfeit church of conciliarism to “couples” who are engaged in unrepentant acts of perversity.

Sensus fidei in the life of the Church aims to make the case, albeit indirectly in its final passages, that the “non-reception” of Catholic doctrine on the part of the lay faithful might represent a need to reconsider how the doctrine is formulated. Translation: do you hear the people sing, singing the song of wanting to be reaffirmed in their sins.

The conciliar revolutionaries have long sought to destroy the sensus Catholicus, the sense of the Catholic Faith, and they have been so successful in this regard that most Catholics alive today regard as alien to the Holy Faith teaching and pastoral practices that have been passed down to us from time immemorial. Those who cleave to the unchanging truths of the Holy Faith are said to be “disobedient” and “schismatic” and “disloyal” and “out of the church” altogether.

The principal means by which the conciliar revolutionaries sought to create a new sensus fidei was the Protestant and Judeo-Masonic Novus Ordo liturgical service. The revolution against Catholic Worship that resulted in the overthrow of the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church as a synthetic concoction, designed to appeal to Protestants and unbelievers, replaced it as a means to propagandize a new and false religion, conciliarism, with such lightning speed so as to break down the supernatural resistance of ordinary Catholics to un-Catholic and anti-Catholic “innovations” by calling upon them to be “obedient” and by helping to disseminate propaganda designed to “erase” true memories of the glories of the Catholic past in order to create artificial” memories that would justify their efforts to “restore” liturgical rites that either next existed or that were used by heretical sects. Most Catholics were so convinced by the revolutionaries that the “past” had been bad that they came to accept the innovations in what was said to be the Catholic liturgy in the name of a “renewal” that was nothing other than a revival of the spirit of antiquarianism (claiming to “restore” ancient rites that never existed or that were used by heretics) that was condemned by Pope Pius VI in Auctorem Fidei on August 28, 1794, and condemned as well by Pope Pius XII in Mediator Dei, November 20, 1947:

The Church is without question a living organism, and as an organism, in respect of the sacred liturgy also, she grows, matures, develops, adapts and accommodates herself to temporal needs and circumstances, provided only that the integrity of her doctrine be safeguarded. This notwithstanding, the temerity and daring of those who introduce novel liturgical practices, or call for the revival of obsolete rites out of harmony with prevailing laws and rubrics, deserve severe reproof. It has pained Us grievously to note, Venerable Brethren, that such innovations are actually being introduced, not merely in minor details but in matters of major importance as well. We instance, in point of fact, those who make use of the vernacular in the celebration of the august eucharistic sacrifice; those who transfer certain feast-days — which have been appointed and established after mature deliberation — to other dates; those, finally, who delete from the prayer books approved for public use the sacred texts of the Old Testament, deeming them little suited and inopportune for modern times.

The use of the Latin language, customary in a considerable portion of the Church, is a manifest and beautiful sign of unity, as well as an effective antidote for any corruption of doctrinal truth. In spite of this, the use of the mother tongue in connection with several of the rites may be of much advantage to the people. But the Apostolic See alone is empowered to grant this permission. It is forbidden, therefore, to take any action whatever of this nature without having requested and obtained such consent, since the sacred liturgy, as We have said, is entirely subject to the discretion and approval of the Holy See.

The same reasoning holds in the case of some persons who are bent on the restoration of all the ancient rites and ceremonies indiscriminately. The liturgy of the early ages is most certainly worthy of all veneration. But ancient usage must not be esteemed more suitable and proper, either in its own right or in its significance for later times and new situations, on the simple ground that it carries the savor and aroma of antiquity. The more recent liturgical rites likewise deserve reverence and respect. They, too, owe their inspiration to the Holy Spirit, who assists the Church in every age even to the consummation of the world. They are equally the resources used by the majestic Spouse of Jesus Christ to promote and procure the sanctity of man.

Assuredly it is a wise and most laudable thing to return in spirit and affection to the sources of the sacred liturgy. For research in this field of study, by tracing it back to its origins, contributes valuable assistance towards a more thorough and careful investigation of the significance of feast-days, and of the meaning of the texts and sacred ceremonies employed on their occasion. But it is neither wise nor laudable to reduce everything to antiquity by every possible device. Thus, to cite some instances, one would be straying from the straight path were he to wish the altar restored to its primitive table form; were he to want black excluded as a color for the liturgical vestments; were he to forbid the use of sacred images and statues in Churches; were he to order the crucifix so designed that the divine Redeemer’s body shows no trace of His cruel sufferings; and lastly were he to disdain and reject polyphonic music or singing in parts, even where it conforms to regulations issued by the Holy See.

Clearly no sincere Catholic can refuse to accept the formulation of Christian doctrine more recently elaborated and proclaimed as dogmas by the Church, under the inspiration and guidance of the Holy Spirit with abundant fruit for souls, because it pleases him to hark back to the old formulas. No more can any Catholic in his right senses repudiate existing legislation of the Church to revert to prescriptions based on the earliest sources of canon law. Just as obviously unwise and mistaken is the zeal of one who in matters liturgical would go back to the rites and usage of antiquity, discarding the new patterns introduced by disposition of divine Providence to meet the changes of circumstances and situation.

This way of acting bids fair to revive the exaggerated and senseless antiquarianism to which the illegal Council of Pistoia gave rise. It likewise attempts to reinstate a series of errors which were responsible for the calling of that meeting as well as for those resulting from it, with grievous harm to souls, and which the Church, the ever watchful guardian of the “deposit of faith” committed to her charge by her divine Founder, had every right and reason to condemn. For perverse designs and ventures of this sort tend to paralyze and weaken that process of sanctification by which the sacred liturgy directs the sons of adoption to their Heavenly Father of their souls’ salvation. (Pope Pius XII, Mediator Dei, November 20, 1947.)

“For perverse designs and ventures of this sort tend to paralyze and weaken that process of sanctification by which the sacred liturgy directs the sons of adoption to their Heavenly Father of their souls’ salvation.” Anyone who cannot see that this one sentence describes the effects of the innovations of the abomination that is the Protestant and Judeo-Masonic Novus Ordo service is not being intellectually honest. The Novus Ordo service is of its very nature as much a revolution against Catholic Faith and Worship as that represented by the liturgies of Protestant sects.

The true sense of the Catholic Faith that should be possessed by baptized Catholics has been replaced by a diabolically-inspired sense that have paralyzed and weakened the processes by which they can sanctify and thus save their immortal souls. Although Sensus fidei in the life of the Church seeks to make a distinction between as part of a “healthy democracy” in the world and the sensus fidei, the document actually endorses a sense of public opinion in the false church conciiarism founded on the false theology of the “people as the Church of God” that is an essential component of the new ecclesiology propagated by Lumen Gentium, November 21, 1964.

The “people” have come to accept all manner of heretical teachings and aberrant, deviant practices as just part of a natural “evolution.” Most Catholics in the conciliar structures today do not get shocked when a false “pontiff” hides his pectoral cross in the presence of Talmudic rabbis in Jerusalem or speak of the Old Covenant as having never been revoked or personally esteem the symbols of false religions with their hands Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI did the latter with his own priestly hands on Thursday, April 17, 2009, at the John Paul II Cultural Center in Washington, District of Columbia, without a word of protest from those who maintained a studied silence about his outrages against the honor and glory and majesty of the Most Blessed Trinity because they had too much to “lose” by pointing out the sins against the First and Second Commandments committed by their supposed “pope of Tradition.”

The “people” are not shocked by any kind of ecumenical “dialogue” or “inter-religious prayer” service as this is what all of this born after 1965 or so have known and it is what many others born before that time have come to accept as part of being “open” to the “goodness” of other “faith traditions.”

The “people” have simply come to accept what those who have the true sensus Catholicus now are apostasies, blasphemies, sacrileges and heresies as integral parts of what they think is the Catholic Faith. They look to Jorge Mario Bergoglio as the man who will do away with any remaining vestiges of the past, and the new document from the International Theological Commission means to empower them all the more, giving the false “pontiff” the false theology that he needs to justify change and novelty in the name of the responding to the “sense” of the faithful.

Yes, the same folks who produced The Hope of Salvation for Infants Who Die Without Being Baptised, April 19, 2007, that in essence, swept away Catholic belief in the existence of Limbo as a place of natural happiness for infants made a similar effort to represent its text as being in keeping with the teaching of the Catholic Church by making references to historical examples of how the sensus fidei has guided Holy Mother Church in the past. The examples given do not prove what the conciliar revolutionaries desire.

To cite one such example, Sensus fidei in the life of the Church attempts to use  Pope Pius IX’s request to the bishops of the world to ascertain whether he should proclaim the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary as similar to its own revolutionary redefinition and application of the sensus fidei:

38. The influence of Perrone’s research on Pope Pius IX’s decision to proceed with the definition of the Immaculate Conception is evident from the fact that before he defined it the Pope asked the bishops of the world to report to him in writing regarding the devotion of their clergy and faithful people to the conception of the Immaculate Virgin.[37] In the apostolic constitution containing the definition, Ineffabilis Deus (1854), Pope Pius IX said that although he already knew the mind of the bishops on this matter, he had particularly asked the bishops to inform him of the piety and devotion of their faithful in this regard, and he concluded that ‘Holy Scripture, venerable Tradition, the constant mind of the Church [perpetuus Ecclesiae sensus], the remarkable agreement of Catholic bishops and the faithful [singularis catholicorum Antistitum ac fidelium conspiratio], and the memorable Acts and Constitutions of our predecessors’ all wonderfully illustrated and proclaimed the doctrine.[38] He thus used the language of Perrone’s treatise to describe the combined testimony of the bishops and the faithful. Newman highlighted the word, conspiratio, and commented: ‘the two, the Church teaching and the Church taught, are put together, as one twofold testimony, illustrating each other, and never to be divided’.[39] (Sensus fidei in the life of the Church.)

There is quite an essential difference between what Pope Pius IX did before proclaiming the doctrine of Our Lady’s Immaculate Conception and what has been done by the revolutionaries who have jettisoned the Catholic past in order to “return” to what the claim are the “sources” of the Faith without any “corrupting filter” provided by the Scholastics of the High Middle Ages.

Devotion to Our Lady as conceived without stain of Original Sin can be traced to the time after the Council of Ephesus in 431 A.D. as bishops in Syria authorized the Feast of the Conception of the Most Holy and All Pure Mother of God that was celebrated on December 9, the date on which Our Lady appeared for the first time to the devout Indian named Juan Diego atop Tepayec Hill exactly eleven hundred years later. And Pope Alexander VII, largely as result of the influence of Venerable Mary of Agreda, who was, after all, a member of the Conceptionist sisters, and of King Philip IV of Spain, issued the first decree in 1661 on the doctrine. It should also be noted that the Venerable Mary of Agreda had a primary source for her devotion to the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary: Our Lady herself.

Pope Pius IX explained the consistent testimony in favor of the doctrine of Our Lady’s Immaculate Conception as follows in Ineffabilus Deus, December 8, 1854:

Supreme Reason for the Privilege: The Divine Maternity

And indeed it was wholly fitting that so wonderful a mother should be ever resplendent with the glory of most sublime holiness and so completely free from all taint of original sin that she would triumph utterly over the ancient serpent. To her did the Father will to give his only-begotten Son — the Son whom, equal to the Father and begotten by him, the Father loves from his heart — and to give this Son in such a way that he would be the one and the same common Son of God the Father and of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It was she whom the Son himself chose to make his Mother and it was from her that the Holy Spirit willed and brought it about that he should be conceived and born from whom he himself proceeds.[1]

Liturgical Argument

The Catholic Church, directed by the Holy Spirit of God, is the pillar and base of truth and has ever held as divinely revealed and as contained in the deposit of heavenly revelation this doctrine concerning the original innocence of the august Virgin — a doctrine which is so perfectly in harmony with her wonderful sanctity and preeminent dignity as Mother of God — and thus has never ceased to explain, to teach and to foster this doctrine age after age in many ways and by solemn acts. From this very doctrine, flourishing and wondrously propagated in the Catholic world through the efforts and zeal of the bishops, was made very clear by the Church when she did not hesitate to present for the public devotion and veneration of the faithful the Feast of the Conception of the Blessed Virgin.[2] By this most significant fact, the Church made it clear indeed that the conception of Mary is to be venerated as something extraordinary, wonderful, eminently holy, and different from the conception of all other human beings — for the Church celebrates only the feast days of the saints.

And hence the very words with which the Sacred Scriptures speak of Uncreated Wisdom and set forth his eternal origin, the Church, both in its ecclesiastical offices and in its liturgy, has been wont to apply likewise to the origin of the Blessed Virgin, inasmuch as God, by one and the same decree, had established the origin of Mary and the Incarnation of Divine Wisdom.

Ordinary Teaching of the Roman Church

These truths, so generally accepted and put into practice by the faithful, indicate how zealously the Roman Church, mother and teacher of all Churches, has continued to teach this doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin. Yet the more important actions of the Church deserve to be mentioned in detail. For such dignity and authority belong to the Church that she alone is the center of truth and of Catholic unity. It is the Church in which alone religion has been inviolably preserved and from which all other Churches must receive the tradition of the Faith.[3]

The same Roman Church, therefore, desired nothing more than by the most persuasive means to state, to protect, to promote and to defend the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception. This fact is most clearly shown to the whole world by numerous and significant acts of the Roman Pontiffs, our predecessors. To them, in the person of the Prince of the Apostles, were divinely entrusted by Christ our Lord, the charge and supreme care and the power of feeding the lambs and sheep; in particular, of confirming their brethren, and of ruling and governing the universal Church.

Veneration of the Immaculate

Our predecessors, indeed, by virtue of their apostolic authority, gloried in instituting the Feast of the Conception in the Roman Church. They did so to enhance its importance and dignity by a suitable Office and Mass, whereby the prerogative of the Virgin, her exception from the hereditary taint, was most distinctly affirmed. As to the homage already instituted, they spared no effort to promote and to extend it either by the granting of indulgences, or by allowing cities, provinces and kingdoms to choose as their patroness God’s own Mother, under the title of “The Immaculate Conception.” Again, our predecessors approved confraternities, congregations and religious communities founded in honor of the Immaculate Conception, monasteries, hospitals, altars, or churches; they praised persons who vowed to uphold with all their ability the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God. Besides, it afforded the greatest joy to our predecessors to ordain that the Feast of the Conception should be celebrated in every church with the very same honor as the Feast of the Nativity; that it should be celebrated with an octave by the whole Church; that it should be reverently and generally observed as a holy day of obligation; and that a pontifical Capella should be held in our Liberian pontifical basilica on the day dedicated to the conception of the Virgin. Finally, in their desire to impress this doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God upon the hearts of the faithful, and to intensify the people’s piety and enthusiasm for the homage and the veneration of the Virgin conceived without the stain of original sin, they delighted to grant, with the greatest pleasure, permission to proclaim the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin in the Litany of Loreto, and in the Preface of the Mass, so that the rule of prayer might thus serve to illustrate the rule of belief. Therefore, we ourselves, following the procedure of our predecessors, have not only approved and accepted what had already been established, but bearing in mind, moreover, the decree of Sixtus IV, [4] have confirmed by our authority a proper Office in honor of the Immaculate Conception, and have with exceeding joy extended its use to the universal Church.[5]

The Roman Doctrine

Now inasmuch as whatever pertains to sacred worship is intimately connected with its object and cannot have either consistency or durability if this object is vague or uncertain, our predecessors, the Roman Pontiffs, therefore, while directing all their efforts toward an increase of the devotion to the conception, made it their aim not only to emphasize the object with the utmost zeal, but also to enunciate the exact doctrine.[6] Definitely and clearly they taught that the feast was held in honor of the conception of the Virgin. They denounced as false and absolutely foreign to the mind of the Church the opinion of those who held and affirmed that it was not the conception of the Virgin but her sanctification that was honored by the Church. They never thought that greater leniency should be extended toward those who, attempting to disprove the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin, devised a distinction between the first and second instance of conception and inferred that the conception which the Church celebrates was not that of the first instance of conception but the second. In fact, they held it was their duty not only to uphold and defend with all their power the Feast of the Conception of the Blessed Virgin but also to assert that the true object of this veneration was her conception considered in its first instant. Hence the words of one of our predecessors, Alexander VII, who authoritatively and decisively declared the mind of the Church: “Concerning the most Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God, ancient indeed is that devotion of the faithful based on the belief that her soul, in the first instant of its creation and in the first instant of the soul’s infusion into the body, was, by a special grace and privilege of God, in view of the merits of Jesus Christ, her Son and the Redeemer of the human race, preserved free from all stain of original sin. And in this sense have the faithful ever solemnized and celebrated the Feast of the Conception.”[7]

Moreover, our predecessors considered it their special solemn duty with all diligence, zeal, and effort to preserve intact the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God. For, not only have they in no way ever allowed this doctrine to be censured or changed, but they have gone much further and by clear statements repeatedly asserted that the doctrine by which we profess the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin is on its own merits entirely in harmony with the ecclesiastical veneration; that it is ancient and widespread, and of the same nature as that which the Roman Church has undertaken to promote and to protect, and that it is entirely worthy to be used in the Sacred Liturgy and solemn prayers. Not content with this they most strictly prohibited any opinion contrary to this doctrine to be defended in public or private in order that the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Virgin might remain inviolate. By repeated blows they wished to put an end to such an opinion. And lest these oft-repeated and clearest statements seem useless, they added a sanction to them.

Papal Sanctions

All these things our illustrious predecessor, Alexander VII, summed up in these words: “We have in mind the fact that the Holy Roman Church solemnly celebrated the Feast of the Conception of the undefiled and ever-Virgin Mary, and has long ago appointed for this a special and proper Office according to the pious, devout, and laudable instruction which was given by our predecessor, Sixtus IV. Likewise, we were desirous, after the example of our predecessors, to favor this praiseworthy piety, devotion, feast and veneration — a veneration which is in keeping with the piety unchanged in the Roman Church from the day it was instituted. We also desired to protect this piety and devotion of venerating and extolling the most Blessed Virgin preserved from original sin by the grace of the Holy Spirit. Moreover, we were anxious to preserve the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace in the flock of Christ by putting down arguments and controversies and by removing scandals. So at the instance and request of the bishops mentioned above, with the chapters of the churches, and of King Philip and his kingdoms, we renew the Constitutions and Decrees issued by the Roman Pontiffs, our predecessors, especially Sixtus IV,[8] Paul V,[9] and Gregory XV,[10] in favor of the doctrine asserting that the soul of the Blessed Virgin, in its creation and infusion into the body, was endowed with the grace of the Holy Spirit and preserved from original sin; and also in favor of the feast and veneration of the conception of the Virgin Mother of God, which, as is manifest, was instituted in keeping with that pious belief. So we command this feast to be observed under the censures and penalties contained in the same Constitutions.

“And therefore, against all and everyone of those who shall continue to construe the said Constitutions and Decrees in a manner apt to frustrate the favor which is thereby given to the said doctrine, and to the feast and relative veneration, or who shall dare to call into question the said sentence, feast and worship, or in any way whatever, directly or indirectly, shall declare themselves opposed to it under any pretext whatsoever, were it but only to the extent of examining the possibilities of effecting the definition, or who shall comment upon and interpret the Sacred Scripture, or the Fathers or Doctors in connection therewith, or finally, for any reason, or on any occasion, shall dare, either in writing or verbally, to speak, preach, treat, dispute or determine upon, or assert whatsoever against the foregoing matters, or who shall adduce any arguments against them, while leaving them unresolved, or who shall disagree therewith in any other conceivable manner, we hereby declare that in addition to the penalties and censures contained in the Constitutions issued by Sixtus IV to which we want them to be subjected and to which we subject them by the present Constitution, we hereby decree that they be deprived of the authority of preaching, reading in public, that is to say teaching and interpreting; and that they be also deprived ipso facto of the power of voting, either actively or passively, in all elections, without the need for any further declaration; and that also, ipso facto, without any further declaration, they shall incur the penalty of perpetual disability from preaching, reading in public, teaching and interpreting, and that it shall not be possible to absolve them from such penalty, or remove it, save through ourselves, or the Roman Pontiffs who shall succeed us.

“We also require that the same shall remain subject to any other penalties which by us, of our own free will — or by the Roman Pontiffs, our successors (according as they may decree) — shall be deemed advisable to establish, and by the present Constitution we declare them subject thereto, and hereby renew the above Decrees and Constitutions of Paul V and Gregory XV.

“Moreover, as regards those books in which the said sentence, feast and relative veneration are called into question or are contradicted in any way whatsoever, according to what has already been stated, either in writing or verbally, in discourses, sermons, lectures, treatises and debates — that may have been printed after the above-praised Decree of Paul V, or may be printed hereafter we hereby prohibit them, subject to the penalties and censures established by the Index of prohibited books, and ipso facto, without any further declaration, we desire and command that they be held as expressly prohibited.”[11]

Testimonies of the Catholic World

All are aware with how much diligence this doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the Mother of God has been handed down, proposed and defended by the most outstanding religious orders, by the more celebrated theological academies, and by very eminent doctors in the sciences of theology. All know, likewise, how eager the bishops have been to profess openly and publicly, even in ecclesiastical assemblies, that Mary, the most holy Mother of God, by virtue of the foreseen merits of Christ, our Lord and Redeemer, was never subject to original sin, but was completely preserved from the original taint, and hence she was redeemed in a manner more sublime.

The Council of Trent

Besides, we must note a fact of the greatest importance indeed. Even the Council of Trent itself, when it promulgated the dogmatic decree concerning original sin, following the testimonies of the Sacred Scriptures, of the Holy Fathers and of the renowned Council, decreed and defined that all men are born infected by original sin; nevertheless, it solemnly declared that it had no intention of including the blessed and immaculate Virgin Mary, the Mother of God, in this decree and in the general extension of its definition. Indeed, considering the times and circumstances, the Fathers of Trent sufficiently intimated by this declaration that the Blessed Virgin Mary was free from the original stain; and thus they clearly signified that nothing could be reasonably cited from the Sacred Scriptures, from Tradition, or from the authority of the Fathers, which would in any way be opposed to so great a prerogative of the Blessed Virgin.[12]

Testimonies of Tradition

And indeed, illustrious documents of venerable antiquity, of both the Eastern and the Western Church, very forcibly testify that this doctrine of the Immaculate Conception of the most Blessed Virgin, which was daily more and more splendidly explained, stated and confirmed by the highest authority, teaching, zeal, knowledge, and wisdom of the Church, and which was disseminated among all peoples and nations of the Catholic world in a marvelous manner — this doctrine always existed in the Church as a doctrine that has been received from our ancestors, and that has been stamped with the character of revealed doctrine. For the Church of Christ, watchful guardian that she is, and defender of the dogmas deposited with her, never changes anything, never diminishes anything, never adds anything to them; but with all diligence she treats the ancient documents faithfully and wisely; if they really are of ancient origin and if the faith of the Fathers has transmitted them, she strives to investigate and explain them in such a way that the ancient dogmas of heavenly doctrine will be made evident and clear, but will retain their full, integral, and proper nature, and will grown only within their own genus — that is, within the same dogma, in the same sense and the same meaning. (Pope Pius IX, Ineffabilus Deus, December 8, 1854.)

Veneration of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary under her title of her Immaculate Conception, a doctrine that was ratified by Our Lady herself on March 25, 1858, when she said “I am the Immaculate Conception” to Saint Bernadette Soubirous in the Grotto of Massabielle near Lourdes, France, is of ancient origin. Pope Pius IX invented nothing new. Neither did the faithful of the Nineteenth Century. The proclamation of the doctrine was a merely an infallible statement of the fact itself.

What ancient sources can the conciliar revolutionaries produce to justify the new ecclesiology’s “the church as communion” and false ecumenism and inter-religious “dialogue” and inter-religious “prayer” and episcopal collegiality and religious liberty and separation of Church and State and their embrace of the condemned and philosophically absurd Modernist concept known as the “evolution of doctrine”?

None.

None whatsoever.

Moreover, can anyone with a shred of intellectual honesty assert that the conciliar revolutionaries have their novelties have “grown within their own genus, within the same dogma, in the same sense and the same meaning”? 

Indeed, the conciliar “doctrines,” such as they are, represent wholesale contradictions of the defined teaching of the Catholic Church, and the fact that most of the lay faithful today have no sense of this is because they have been exposed to false doctrines, false liturgical rites and false pastoral practices that have helped to create, foster and sustain a false sensus Catholicus.

Sensus fidei in the life of the Church goes so far as to state that the sensus fidei has an “ecumenical dimension,” meaning that non-Catholics have a role to play in the development of what is said to be Catholic doctrine. No, I am not making this up.

See for yourselves:

The notions, sensus fidei, sensus fidelium, and consensus fidelium, have all been treated, or at least mentioned, in various international dialogues between the Catholic Church and other churches and ecclesial communities. Broadly speaking, there has been agreement in these dialogues that the whole body of the faithful, lay as well as ordained, bears responsibility for maintaining the Church’s apostolic faith and witness, and that each of the baptised, by reason of a divine anointing (1Jn 2:20, 27), has the capacity to discern the truth in matters of faith. There is also general agreement that certain members of the Church exercise a special responsibility of teaching and oversight, but always in collaboration with the rest of the faithful.[106] 

86. Two particular questions related to the sensus fidelium arise in the context of the ecumenical dialogue to which the Catholic Church is irrevocably committed:[107] 

i) Should only those doctrines which gain the common consent of all Christians be regarded as expressing the sensus fidelium and therefore as true and binding? This proposal goes counter to the Catholic Church’s faith and practice. By means of dialogue, Catholic theologians and those of other traditions seek to secure agreement on Church-dividing questions, but the Catholic participants cannot suspend their commitment to the Catholic Church’s own established doctrines.

ii) Should separated Christians be understood as participating in and contributing to the sensus fidelium in some manner? The answer here is undoubtedly in the affirmative.[108] The Catholic Church acknowledges that ‘many elements of sanctification and truth’ are to be found outside her own visible bounds,[109] that ‘certain features of the Christian mystery have at times been more effectively emphasised’ in other communities,[110] and that ecumenical dialogue helps her to deepen and clarify her own understanding of the Gospel. (Sensus fidei in the life of the Church.)

Complete and total heresy.

The Divine Constitution of Holy Mother Church is complete in and of itself. There is no need to gather the “sensus fidelium” of the Protestants and the Orthodox as they are outside her maternal bosom and cleave to heresies of one sort or another. The Catholic Church alone is the guardian of truth and the sole means of human sanctification. None other.

This has sprung from within the “same dogma, in the same sense and the same meaning”?

Hardly.

Part two, which will be published tomorrow, the Feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, will deal with the recourse the new “unofficial” official document has to the role of “proper” kind of “public opinion,” which, of course, has been used to prepare the Instrumentum Laboris that will be issued just hours after the posting of this commentary (see, for example, Always Asking All The Wrong Questions, part one and Always Asking All the Wrong Questions, part two.)

There must be a new sense for a new faith, a faith that is the counterfeit ape of the Catholic Faith.

Prepare well for tomorrow’s great feast day on this octave day of the Solemnity of Corpus Christi and the Commemoration of Saints John and Paul, praying a few more Rosaries in reparations for the wounds that the conciliar revolutionaries have inflicted upon the twin, matchless Hearts, the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

Isn’t it time to pray a Rosary now?

Vivat Christus Rex! Viva Cristo Rey!

Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us now and at the hour of our death.

Saint Joseph, pray for us.

Saints Peter and Paul, pray for us.

Saint John the Baptist, pray for us.

Saint John the Evangelist, pray for us.

Saint Michael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Gabriel the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Raphael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saints Joachim and Anne, pray for us.

Saints John and Paul, pray for us.

 

June 24, 2014, Articles

June 24, 2014, Feast of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist:

Work on the International Theological Commission’s deconstruction, distortion and misrepresentation of the sensus fidei proceeds slowly. It is my hope to have a mercifully brief synopsis of this apologia in behalf of “listening to the people” by tomorrow morning.

Today, though, there are two articles.

One deals with Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi, Monsters of Their Own Making, and the other is a republished reflection for the feast day of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist: His Name Shall Be John.

Our Lady of the Rosary, pray for us.

Saint John the Baptist, pray for us.

 

His Name Shall Be John

Today is the Feast of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist, Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ’s precursor who called sinners to repentance as he was preparing the way for Our Lord to assume His Public Ministry. Saint John the Baptist, who had been freed from Original Sin at the moment of the Visitation, lived an austere life of penance and mortification as the last Prophet of the Old Testament. His efforts to call sinners to repentance spared no one, including King Herod the Tetrarch, the son of the notorious Herod the Great who had sought to kill the Infant Jesus shortly after His birth in Bethlehem.

Saint John the Baptist’s remonstrations with King Herod the Tetrarch stand in stark contrast to the cowardice of most of the false “bishops” of the counterfeit church of conciliarism in the United States of America, men who lack the prophetic courage to discharge their apostolic duties by denouncing those in public life, Catholic and/or non-Catholic, who support grave evils such as abortion and contraception and the perversion of the Sixth and Ninth Commandments, among so many others. As the last of the Old Testament Prophets, Saint John the Baptist was merely carrying on the example and the work of Amoz and Osee and Nathan and Gad and Isaiah and Ezekiel and Jeremiah. The words of Amoz were particularly harsh and stinging concerning the infidelity of the Chosen People and their leaders.

Saint John the Baptist’s father, Zachary, was told of his son’s mission by Saint Gabriel the Archangel:

And there appeared to him an angel of the Lord, standing on the right side of the altar of incense. And Zachary seeing him, was troubled, and fear fell upon him.

But the angel said to him: Fear not, Zachary, for thy prayer is heard; and thy wife Elizabeth shall bear thee a son, and thou shalt call his name John: and thou shalt have joy and gladness, and many shall rejoice in his nativity.

For he shall be great before the Lord; and shall drink no wine nor strong drink; and he shall be filled with the Holy Ghost, even from his mother’s womb. And he shall convert many of the children of Israel to the Lord their God. And he shall go before him in the spirit and power of Elias; that he may turn the hearts of the fathers unto the children, and the incredulous to the wisdom of the just, to prepare unto the Lord a perfect people.

And Zachary said to the angel: Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife is advanced in years.

And the angel answering, said to him: I am Gabriel, who stand before God; and am sent to speak to thee, and to bring thee these good things. And behold, thou shalt be dumb until the day wherein these things shall come to pass because thou hast not believed my words, which shall be fulfilled in their time. (Lk 1: 11-20)

Zachary’s being rendered dumb until after the Nativity of his son, Saint John the Baptist, the cousin and precursor of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity made Man, is quite a contrast to the fact that his son preached eloquently and clearly even in the world. Saint John the Baptist leapt for joy in his mother’s womb when he heard the sound of Our Lady’s voice at the moment of the Visitation, which event we commemorate ion July 2 (for reasons explained in Magnificat). Saint John the Baptist preached clearly at that very moment as he was freed from Original Sin about the inviolability of human life in the womb and about the veneration that is to be paid to the Mother of God and to the adoration that must be paid to the One she carried in her virginal and immaculate womb, Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. Saint John the Baptist continued to preach clearly and unequivocally when he began his mission as the last of the Old Testament Prophets, preparing the way for the coming of Our Lord to assume His Public Ministry.

Our Lady explained the significance of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist six months, one day before the Nativity of her Divine Son, Our Lord Himself:

270. The hour for the rising of the morning star, which was to precede the clear Sun of justice and announce the wished-for day of the law of grace, had arrived (John 5, 35). The time was suitable to the Most High for the appearance of his Prophet in the world; and greater than a prophet was John, who pointing out with his finger the Lamb (John 1, 29), was to prepare mankind for the salvation and sanctification of the world. Before issuing from the maternal womb the Lord revealed to the blessed child the hour in which he was to commence his mortal career among men. The child had the perfect use of his reason, and of the divine science infused by the presence of the incarnate Word. He therefore knew that he was to arrive at the port of a cursed and dangerous land, and to walk upon a world full of evils and snares, where many are overtaken by ruin and perdition.

271. On this account the great child was as it were in a state of suspense and doubt: for on the one hand, nature having nourished his body to that state of perfection, which is proper to birth, he recognized and felt, in addition to the express will of God, the compelling forces of nature which urged him to leave the retreat of the maternal womb. On the other hand he contemplated the dangerous risks of mortal life. Thus he hesitated between the fear of danger and the desire to obey. And he debated within himself: “If I meet this danger of losing God, whither shall it lead me? How can I safely converse with men, of whom so many are enveloped in darkness and wander from the path of life ? I am in the obscurity of my mother s womb, but I must leave it for a more dangerous darkness. I was imprisoned here, since I received the light of reason; but more must I dread the unrestrained freedom of mortals. But let me, O Lord, fulfill thy will and enter the world; for to execute it is always best. To know that my life and my faculties shall be consumed in thy service, highest King, will make it easier for me to come forth to the light and begin life. Bestow, O Lord, thy blessing for my passage into the world”. . .

My dearest daughter, do not be surprised, that my servant John feared and hesitated to come into the world. Life can never be loved by the ignorant devotee of the world in the same degree, as the wise, in divine science, abhor and fear its dangers. This science was eminently possessed by the Precursor of my most holy Son; hence knowing of the loss which threatened, he feared the risk. But, since he that knows and dreads the treacherous seas of this world, sails so much the more securely over their unfathomed depths, it served him in good stead for entering securely into the world. The fortunate child began his career with such disgust and abhorrence of all earthly things, that his horror never abated. He made no peace with the flesh (Mark 6, 17), nor partook of its poison, nor allowed vanity to enter his senses nor obstruct his eyes; in abhorrence of the world and of worldly things, he gave his life for justice. The citizen of the true Jerusalem cannot be in peace or in alliance with Babylon; nor is it possible to enjoy at the same time the grace of the Most High and the friendship of his declared enemies; for no one can serve two hostile masters, nor can light and darkness, Christ and Beliel, harmonize (Matth. 4, 4).

279. Guard thyself, my dearest, against those living in darkness and the lovers of the world more than against fire ; for the wisdom of the sons of this world is carnal and diabolical, and their ways lead to death. In order to walk the way of truth, even at the cost of the natural life, it is necessary to preserve the peace of the soul. Three dwelling-places I point out for thee to live in, from which thou must never intentionally come forth. If at any time the Lord should bid thee to relieve the necessities of thy fellow creatures, I desire that thou do not lose this refuge. Act as one who lives in a castle surrounded by enemies, and who perchance must go to the gate to transact necessary business. He acts with such wariness, that he will pay more attention to safeguard his retreat and shield himself, than to transact business with others, being always on the watch and on guard against danger. So must thou live, if thou wishest to live securely; for doubt not, that enemies more cruel and poisonous than asps and basilisks surround thee.

280. Thy habitations shall be the Divinity of the Most High, the humanity of my most holy Son, and thy own interior. In the Divinity thou must live like the pearl in its shell, or like the fish in the sea, allowing thy desires and affections to roam in its infinite spaces. The most holy humanity shall be the wall, which defends thee; and his bosom shall be the place of thy rest, and under his wings shalt thou find refreshment (Ps. 16, 8). Thy own interior shall afford thee peaceful delight through the testimony of a good conscience (Cor. 2, 12), and it will, if thou keep it pure, familiarize thee with the sweet and friendly intercourse of thy Spouse. In order that thou mayest be aided therein by retirement of the body, I desire that thou remain secluded in thy choir or in thy cell, leaving it only, when obedience or charity make it inevitable. I will tell thee a secret: there are demons, whom Lucifer has expressly ordered to watch for the religious, who come forth from their retirement, in order to beset them and engage them in battle and cause their fall. The demons do not easily go into the cells, because there they do not find the occasions afforded by conversations and the use of the senses, wherein they ordinarily capture and devour their prey like ravenous wolves. They are tormented by the retirement and recollection of religious, knowing that they are foiled in their attempts, as long as they cannot entice them into human discourse.

281. It is also certain that ordinarily the demons have no power over souls, unless they gain entrance by some venial or mortal fault. Mortal sin gives them a sort of direct right over those who commit it; while venial sin weakens the strength of the soul and invites their attacks. Imperfections diminish the merit and the progress of virtue, and encourage the enemy. Whenever the astute serpent notices that the soul bears with its own levity and forgets about its danger, it blinds it and seeks to instill its deadly poison. The enemy then entices the soul like a little heedless bird, until it falls into one of the many snares from which there seems to be no escape.

282. Admire then, my daughter, what thou hast learned by divine enlightenment and weep in deepest sorrow over the ruin of so many souls  absorbed in such dangerous tepidity. They live in the obscurity of their passions and depraved inclinations, forgetful of the danger, unmoved by their losses, and heedless of their dealings. Instead of fearing and avoiding the occasions of evil, they encounter and seek for them in blind ignorance. In senseless fury they follow their pleasures, place no restraint on their passionate desires, and care not where they walk, even if to the most dangerous precipices. They are surrounded by innumerable enemies, who pursue them with diabolical treachery, unceasing vigilance, unquenchable wrath and restless diligence. What wonder then, that from such extremes, or rather from such unequal combat, irreparable defeats should arise among the mortals? And that, since the number of fools is infinite, the number of the reprobate should also be uncountable, and that the demon should be inflated by his triumphs in the perdition of so many men? May the eternal God preserve thee from such a misfortune; and do thou weep and deplore that of thy brethren, continually asking for their salvation as far as is possible. (The Venerable Mary of Agreda, The Mystical City of God: Volume III: The Incarnation, pp. 221-223; 226-229).

What excuse do we have for being as worldly as we are in our daily pursuits, making so little time in most cases for prayer and even voluntary acts of penance by withdrawing from a few legitimate pleasures even though our closest friends and relatives may consider us unusual for doing so? We must, therefore, pray to Saint John the Baptist every day, especially before Holy Mass, so that he might prepare the way for Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ’s coming into our souls by means of Holy Communion just as he had prepared the way for the coming of His Public Ministry by means of his own preaching in the wilderness. The more we are united with the spirit of Saint John the Baptist in this time of hatred of Christ the King in the world and a distortion of His Sacred Deposit of Faith by the lords of the counterfeit church of conciliarism is the more that we will be ready to reject worldliness in order to have souls that are more ready to serve Our King with promptness and with true delight.

Thus vivified by the baptism he received in Saint Elizabeth’s womb at the Visitation, Saint John the Baptist was able to preach fearlessly in the wilderness. mincing no words when denouncing King Herod the Tetrarch for his bigamous and adulterous “marriage” to the wife of his brother Philip, Herodias. Herod knew that the Baptist was correct and that he was living in sin. Herodias, though, did not share Herod’s misgivings about their relationship, scheming with her daughter Salome to have the head of the Baptist delivered to her on a silver platter, thus fulfilling Saint John’s prophesy about himself: ” He must increase, but I must decrease” (Jn. 3: 30) Saint John the Baptist was unafraid to stand up in defense of the truth. He did not bow to the will of those in power who did evil. He did not have a “grand strategy” to try to mask the truth in order to make it more palatable to anyone, whether those in civil power or to the people in the crowds listening to his sermons. He knew that the One Whose way he had prepared would reward him for his fidelity to the mission that had been entrusted to him, which included a firm proclamation of uncomfortable truths to the lowly and the powerful alike.

The first bishops of the Church, the Apostles, became as bold as Saint John the Baptist following the descent of the Holy Ghost upon them and our dear Blessed Mother on Pentecost Sunday. They were unafraid to proclaim the truths of the Divine Redeemer, counting it as pure gain to be reviled by the Jewish religious authorities and to be misunderstood and persecuted by the secular Roman authorities. They did not shrink from telling all men that there was no other Name other than that of the Holy Name of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ by which they could be saved from their sins. They trusted in the power of the graces won by the shedding of Our Lord’s Most Precious Blood on the wood of the Holy Cross to proclaim clearly and unequivocally what the Divine Master had entrusted to them, knowing that the seeds they planted might never come to fruition in their own lifetimes. They cared about fidelity to Christ their King, not about human respect or earthly privilege.

It has been the case throughout the history of the Church that bishops and priests and ordinary lay men and women have had to stand fast in behalf of the truths of the Divine Redeemer as He has revealed them through His true Church when those truths have been undermined and/or ignored by public officials. According to Saint Alphonsus de Liguori, thirteen million Catholics accepted death as the price of their fidelity to Our Lord rather than worship the false gods of the secular Roman Empire. Great bishops and priests and members of the laity stood fast against the injustices and immorality of some of leaders of Catholic Europe.

Saint Thomas a Becket asserted the rights of the Church against the claims of King Henry II.

Saint Stanislaus was slain personally by the jealous King Boleslaus.

Saint John Nepumocene was killed on orders of King Wenceslaus IV in Prague for refusing divulge the Queen’s confession.

Saint John Fisher was the only bishop in England who remained faithful to Rome when King Henry VIII had Parliament declare him to be the “supreme head of the Church in England.”

Saint Thomas More refused to assent publicly to that declaration or to the validity of Henry’s marriage to Anne Boleyn. Over 72,000 Catholics, fully 3.1 percent of the population of England at the time, were put to death by Henry and his minions between 1534 and the time of his death in 1547.

Thousands of Catholics were persecuted during the French Revolution and its aftermath.

As is being noted in my soon-to-be-concluded series on the Cristeros War, thousands of Catholics died as a result of the anticlericalism of the Freemason Plutarco Elias Calles and the military assistance provided him by the government of the United States of America.

Countless numbers perished as a result of Bolshevism and Nazism. Father Maximilian Kolbe was imprisoned in Auschwitz, where he gave up his life for a fellow prisoner, because he was a fierce critic of all manner of secular political ideologies and movements, including Freemasonry and Zionism, that were poisoning the world and thus ruining souls.

The late Bishop Ignatius Kung spent over thirty years in a Red Chinese prison cell for his remaining steadfastly loyal to Pope Pius XII after the Chinese Communists had created their own schismatic, rump church, with which Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI made his “peace” on June 29, 2007.

This list could on and on and on. These great heroes of the Faith did not do the bidding of Herod’s successors: they proclaimed the truth to the point of their deaths, trusting that the all-merciful Lord would reward them for their fidelity and that their efforts would be used by Our Lady in ways that that would not be made manifest to them until eternity.

How sad it is to note, therefore, that most of the “bishops” of the counterfeit church of conciliarism, including the false “bishops” of the United States Conference of Conciliar “Bishops,” have more in common with Herod the Tetrarch and with the enemies of the Faith over the centuries than they do with Saint John the Baptist and with the true Catholic bishops of the past. Most of the “bishops” in the conciliar structures in the United States of America, for example, believe that it is inopportune, imprudent, unpastoral or otherwise bad form to boldly proclaim truths in order to defend the integrity of the Holy Faith, including the integrity of what they purport, falsely, as we know, to be the Most Blessed Sacrament, a result in large part of a loss of the Faith among many in the hierarchy. Thus we find alleged “successors” of the Apostles tripping all over themselves to curry favor with the rich and powerful.

No, this is not a new phenomenon, to be sure. There were plenty of examples of bishops who did the bidding of corrupt rulers in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, many more who did so in the aftermath of the Protestant Revolt (men who held their tongues in the fear that a rebuke to a public official might lose a particular country to the forces of Protestantism, as Father Denis Fahey noted so well in The Mystical Body of Christ in the Modern World.).

What is new, however, is that the counterfeit church of conciliarism’s false “Mass” embraces a false spirit of an “opening up to the world”, thus feeding the natural tendency of human beings to refrain from doing that which is difficult, especially as it pertains to the defense of the Faith and the proper formation of souls unto eternity, in order to maintain peace and a sense of “respectability.”

A whole legion of Herod’s helpers in the conciliar “hierarchy,” therefore, has thus been created by the very ambiance of the heresies and the errors of conciliarism, not the least of which are religious liberty and the belief that the civil state must be separated from the Church. These Herod’s helpers enable by silence and by public praise public officials who are at war with everything contained in the Deposit of Faith and thus everything that is necessary for the right ordering of souls and of societies. Why shouldn’t they? It’s what they do every day of their conciliar lives from the chancery offices they hold illicitly and as they offend God at the Protestant and Judeo-Masonic Novus Ordo community table.

The loss of the sensus Catholicus in the structures of the counterfeit church of conciliarism has been such that there has been a manifest rejection of the belief that a Catholic bishop must be willing to lose his head to defend the truths of the Holy Faith. So must we, obviously. A true bishop, however, has a special obligation by virtue of his possessing the fullness of the priesthood to bear a visible, courageous witness to the Holy Faith so as to inspire and embolden the faithful themselves to do so in every aspect of their own lives. Upon his immortal soul rests the eternal salvation of everyone who lives within the boundaries of his episcopal jurisdiction, Catholic and non-Catholic alike. If he does not see in Saint John the Baptist and the Apostles and the martyrs who came from the ranks of the episcopate and the priesthood his example of how to deal firmly with public scandal and with laws that are at variance with the laws of God and the rights of His Holy Church, then he is likely to be numbered in history among the largely anonymous vipers who went along with Thomas Cromwell and Thomas Cranmer in England nearly 470 years ago.

Then again, of course, the “bishops” of conciliarism lack the grace of state. They are not bishops. They are merely administrators of large corporate offices which exist to make war upon the authentic patrimony of the Catholic Church. Lost in the minds of these false shepherds is any knowledge–no less acceptance–of these stirring words of Pope Pius VI, contained in Inscrutabile, December 25, 1775:

Consequently, you who are the salt of the earth, guardians and shepherds of the Lord’s flock, whose business it is to fight the battles of the Lord, arise and gird on your sword, which is the word of God, and expel this foul contagion from your lands. How long are we to ignore the common insult to faith and Church? Let the words of Bernard arouse us like a lament of the spouse of Christ: “Of old was it foretold and the time of fulfillment is now at hand: Behold, in peace is my sorrow most sorrowful. It was sorrowful first when the martyrs died; afterwards it was more sorrowful in the fight with the heretics and now it is most sorrowful in the conduct of the members of the household…. The Church is struck within and so in peace is my sorrow most sorrowful. But what peace? There is peace and there is no peace. There is peace from the pagans and peace from the heretics, but no peace from the children. At that time the voice will lament: Sons did I rear and exalt, but they despised me. They despised me and defiled me by a bad life, base gain, evil traffic, and business conducted in the dark.” Who can hear these tearful complaints of our most holy mother without feeling a strong urge to devote all his energy and effort to the Church, as he has promised? Therefore cast out the old leaven, remove the evil from your midst. Forcefully and carefully banish poisonous books from the eyes of your flock, and at once courageously set apart those who have been infected, to prevent them harming the rest. The holy Pope Leo used to say, “We can rule those entrusted to us only by pursuing with zeal for the Lord’s faith those who destroy and those who are destroyed and by cutting them off from sound minds with the utmost severity to prevent the plague spreading.” In doing this We exhort and advise you to be all of one mind and in harmony as you strive for the same object, just as the Church has one faith, one baptism, and one spirit. As you are joined together in the hierarchy, so you should unite equally with virtue and desire.

The affair is of the greatest importance since it concerns the Catholic faith, the purity of the Church, the teaching of the saints, the peace of the empire, and the safety of nations. Since it concerns the entire body of the Church, it is a special concern of yours because you are called to share in Our pastoral concern, and the purity of the faith is particularly entrusted to your watchfulness. “Now therefore, Brothers, since you are overseers among God’s people and their soul depends on you, raise their hearts to your utterance,” that they may stand fast in faith and achieve the rest which is prepared for believers only. Beseech, accuse, correct, rebuke and fear not: for ill-judged silence leaves in their error those who could be taught, and this is most harmful both to them and to you who should have dispelled the error. The holy Church is powerfully refreshed in the truth as it struggles zealously for the truth. In this divine work you should not fear either the force or favor of your enemies. The bishop should not fear since the anointing of the Holy Spirit has strengthened him: the shepherd should not be afraid since the prince of pastors has taught him by his own example to despise life itself for the safety of his flock: the cowardice and depression of the hireling should not dwell in a bishop’s heart. Our great predecessor Gregory, in instructing the heads of the churches, said with his usual excellence: “Often imprudent guides in their fear of losing human favor are afraid to speak the right freely. As the word of truth has it, they guard their flock not with a shepherd’s zeal but as hirelings do, since they flee when the wolf approaches by hiding themselves in silence…. A shepherd fearing to speak the right is simply a man retreating by keeping silent.” But if the wicked enemy of the human race, the better to frustrate your efforts, ever brings it about that a plague of epidemic proportions is hidden from the religious powers of the world, please do not be terrified but walk in God’s house in harmony, with prayer, and in truth, the three arms of our service. Remember that when the people of Juda were defiled, the best means of purification was the public reading to all, from the least to the greatest, of the book of the law lately found by the priest Helcias in the Lord’s temple; at once the whole people agreed to destroy the abominations and seal a covenant in the Lord’s presence to follow after the Lord and observe His precepts, testimonies and ceremonies with their whole heart and soul.” For the same reason Josaphat sent priests and Levites to bring the book of the law throughout the cities of Juda and to teach the people. The proclamation of the divine word has been entrusted to your faith by divine, not human, authority. So assemble your people and preach to them the gospel of Jesus Christ. From that divine source and heavenly teaching draw draughts of true philosophy for your flock. Persuade them that subjects ought to keep faith and show obedience to those who by God’s ordering lead and rule them. To those who are devoted to the ministry of the Church, give proofs of faith, continence, sobriety, knowledge, and liberality, that they may please Him to whom they have proved themselves and boast only of what is serious, moderate, and religious. But above all kindle in the minds of everyone that love for one another which Christ the Lord so often and so specifically praised. For this is the one sign of Christians and the bond of perfection. (Pope Pius VI, Inscrutabile, December 25, 1775.)

Just as we sometimes get bogged down in the trees of the forests of partisan politics, as I pointed out repeatedly in scores of articles and in my lectures, over the years, it also the case that we tend to get bogged down in the trees of ecclesiastical politics, forgetting that today’s Herod’s Helpers, such as Roger “Cardinal” Mahony and Donald Wuerl and Theodore “Cardinal” McCarrick and George Niederauer, have been merely the successors of the late John Cardinal Dearden, in whose Archdiocese of Detroit Call to Action started, and the late Joseph “Cardinal” Bernardin, who invented the “consistent ethic of life” (seamless garment) to provide a cover for Catholics to vote for pro-abortion Catholic politicians with impunity. (And Dearden and Bernardin were merely carrying on the work of the late Francis Cardinal Spellman and the late Richard Cardinal Cushing, who were themselves merely the inheritors of the Americanism of John Carroll and John Ireland and James Gibbons, et al.)

“Saint Paul II”  appointed many of these men these men. Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict xvI promoted the likes of Niederauer and Wuerl. Karol Wojtyla/John Paul II did not remove them. His curial “cardinals” actually enabled them by undermining frequently the few “bishops” who st up against them. The problem is not with the false “bishops” in the United States, my friends: it is conciliarism itself, including the very conciliarist error of episcopal collegiality that has made war against and rendered most Catholics silent about the authentic patrimony of the Catholic Church during the past forty years as surely as Zachary himself was rendered dumb prior to the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist on this very day. And this is to say nothing of all of the other things that have flowed from the wake of “Second “Vatican Council, namely, the doctrinal and liturgical revolutions.

Saint John the Baptist did not mince words when dealing with the situation of his own day. We cannot mince words either, whether it be with the lords of Modernity in the world or the lords of conciliarism, starting with Jorge Mario Bergoglio/Francis The Liberator, in the counterfeit church of conciliarism.

Always making sure to pray for those whose words and actions we must denounce and to enfold them in the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary, we must remember that the many of the great saints who confronted the errors and vices of their own days (Saint Jerome, Saint Nicholas, Saint Athanasius, Saint Boniface, Saint Anthony, Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, Saint John Marie Vianney, among many others) did so in a manner evocative of the spirit of Saint John the Baptist, denouncing falsehood firmly and without any concession made in the direction of the fuzzy sentimentality that exists in the world at present as the result of the rotten fruit of Protestantism and all of its permutations, including Modernism.

One of the worst chastisement God can send is Church is bad bishops and bad priests, as was the case with the Americanist bishops and priests who helped to pave the way for Dignitatis Humanae, December 7, 1965, and other conciliarist errors by their embrace of the civil state without the true Faith. Worse yet is the chastisement of false bishops and false priests! We are being chastised, make no mistake about it. We must therefore pray and do penance for our own sins and those of the whole world, especially for the sins of those in ecclesiastical authority who look askance at the example of Saint John the Baptist and the Apostles and their own predecessors in the line of Apostolic succession.

While it is important to chronicle the betrayals of  the “bishops” and “priests” of the counterfeit church of conciliarism, we must remember that those who are Herod’s helpers will be consigned to the dust bin of ecclesiastical history if they do not repent of their treachery before they die. God will not be mocked. He will impose judgment on those members of the counterfeit church of conciliarism who have represented themselves falsely as Catholic bishops while they sought human respect and popularity rather than stand fast in His behalf to the point of physical torture and death.

Trusting, as always, in the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary, may we offer her our daily prayers and penances and sacrifices, especially by means of praying as many Rosaries each day as our states-in-life permit, so that she can present them to the Most Sacred Heart of her Divine Son, Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, in reparation for our sins and those of the whole world.

Saint John the Baptist helped to prepare way for the Coming of Our Lord to assume His Public Ministry. Like Saint John the Baptist and by his holy intercession, therefore, may we be heralds of Our Lord as we seek to prepare the way for His many “comings” into the lives of the souls for whom He shed every single drop of His Most Precious Blood on the wood of the Holy Cross, never failing to proclaim His truths with fidelity and with true Charity for the eternal good of others, offering all to the Sacred Heart of Jesus through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary.

Vivat Christus Rex!

Viva Cristo Rey!

Our Lady of the Rosary, us.

Saint Joseph, pray for us.

 

Saints Peter and Paul, pray for us.

Saint John the Baptist, pray for us.

Saint John the Evangelist, pray for us.

Saint Michael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Gabriel the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Raphael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saints Joachim and Anne, pray for us.

Saints Caspar, Melchior, and Balthasar, pray for us.

Saint Zachary, pray for us.

Saint Elizabeth, pray for us.

Monsters of Their Own Making

Mrs. Solange Hertz, writing in her landmark The Star Spangled Heresy: How the Catholic Church in America became the American Catholic Church, discussed how Pope Pius IX warned the progenitor of Americanism, Father Isaac Thomas Hecker, the founder of the Society of Saint Paul (the Paulist Fathers), that Americans were too busy immersed in the the pursuit of material wealth, a warning that the proud Americanist could simply not accept as being true as the Church had to made an “accommodation” to the modern world:

In a private audience Pius IX tactfully suggested to him, “The Americans are so engrossed in worldly pursuits and in getting money, and these things are not favorable to religion. It’s not I who say this, but our Lord in the Gospel. In the United States there exists a liberty too unrestrained; all the refugees and revolutionaries gather there.” Hecker persisted nonetheless in tailoring the Gospel to American vices in order to spread the Faith, while [Bishop John Joseph] Keane [who was born in Ireland and a staunch Americanist] lectured at the Brussels Congress on “the ultimate religion of the future,” speaking to all who would listen (and would who would not) of “letting down the bars” and “development of dogma” following on a “grand opening of windows” such as we now have. A great admirer of [German Chancellor and virulently anti-Catholic Otto von) Bismarck, he had the effrontery to toast the enemy of Christianity along with Leo XIII and Gladstone at a banquet in Washington. (Solange Hertz, The Star Spangled Heresy: How the Catholic Church in America became the American Catholic Church, Veritas Press, 1992, p. 151.)

Speaking in a like vein in the 1880s and 1890s was Archbishop John Ireland,  who was the Bishop and (starting in 1888) the Archbishop of Saint Paul, Minnesota, from July 31, 1884, to May 25, 1918. Ireland was an outspoken advocate of the introduction of “progress” in the world into the pastoral life of the Catholic Church, which had to be “reconciled” to “the age.” Ireland’s sermon, which was delivered on October 18, 1893, on the occasion of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the episcopal consecration of his Americanist ally, James Cardinal Gibbons, the Archbishop of Baltimore, Maryland, between 1877 and 1921:

The New Crusade–Bringing Into Close Contact Church And Age

What! the Church of the living God, the Church of ten thousand victories over pagans and barbarians, over false philosophies and heresies, over defiant kings and unruly peoples–the great, freedom-loving, philanthropic, truth-giving Catholic Church–this Church afraid of the nineteenth century! afraid of any century! not seeing in the nineteenth the fervent ebullitions of noblest sentiments, the germinations of her own Christlike plantings; this Church not eager for the fray, not precipitating herself with force irresistible upon this modern world to claim it, to love it, to foster and admire or to correct and cure, to own it for Christ, and with her impetuous arm to lift it to the very summit of its highest aspirations, to which only the Church’s aid this panting, hoping, despairing world can every reach! Far, far from Catholics be the chilling, fatal, un-Catholic thought!

I preach the new, the most glorious crusade. Church and age! Unite them in the name of humanity, in the name of God.


Church and age! Bring them into close contact; they pulsate alike; the God of humanity works in one, the God of supernatural revelations works in the other–in both the self-same God
. . . .

It is an age of liberty, civil and political; it is the age of the democracy, when the whole people, tired of the unrestricted way of sovereigns, become themselves the sovereigns, become themselves the sovereigns, and exercise with more or less directness the power was always their primarily by divine ordinance. The age of the democracy! The Catholic Church, I am sure, has no fear of the democracy, this flowering of her own most sacred principles of the equality, fraternity, and liberty of all men, in Christ and through Christ. These principles are spread upon every page of the gospel. From the moment they were first confided to the Church they have been ceaselessly leavening minds and hearts towards the fullest recognition of rights and the dignity among all men, toward the elevation of the multitudes of men, and the enjoyment by them of freedom from unnecessary restrictions, of social happiness mingled with as few sorrows as earth’s planet permits. The whole history of the Catholic Church is the record of the enfranchisement of the slave, the curbing of royal tyranny, the defence of the poor, of the people, of woman, of all the social entities that pride and passion choose to trample upon. The great theologians of the Church, an Aquinas, a Suarez, provide in their teachings complete foundations for the political democracy, which assumes in the presume age its plenary form. They assert and prove that all political power comes from God through the people, whose delegates kings and princes are, and that when rulers become tyrants the inalienable right of revolution is reserved to the people. The Church lives under all forms of government. When ratified by the people all forms of legitimate; but the government which more than another is that of the people, by the people, and for the people, is the one where the Church of the people, the Catholic Church, breathes air most congenial to her principles of her heart. (Archbishop John Ireland, A Sermon of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the Episcopal Consecration of His Eminence James Cardinal Gibbons, Archbishop of Baltimore. Full text found in The Voice of the Church, a book published by the Bishops of the United States of America in 1899, pp. 103-113. We were given this book by a friend of ours who believed that it would be of use in my work. It is a treasure of Americanism mixed in with various articles that are authentically Catholic. In other words, it was very representative of the state of confusion that existed in the minds of Catholics in the United States of America at the end of the Nineteenth Century, a state of confusion that has now been spread worldwide as a result of conciliarism’s embrace of “the age.”)

This was a road map to “Saint John XXIII’s” aggorgimento. It was also a road map to what the supposedly “conservative” and “traditionally-minded” Joseph Ratzinger/Benedict XVI wrote in his manual of Modernism, Principles of Catholic Theology:

Let us be content to say here that the text [of Gaudium et Spes] serves as a countersyllabus and, as such, represents on the part of the Church, an attempt at an official reconciliation with the new era inaugurated in 1789. Only from this perspective can we understand, on the one hand, the ghetto-mentality, of which we have spoken above; only from this perspective can we understand, on the other hand, the meaning of the remarkable meeting of the Church and the world. Basically, the word “world” means the spirit of the modern era, in contrast to which the Church’s group-consciousness saw itself as a separate subject that now, after a war that had been in turn both hot and cold, was intent on dialogue and cooperation. (Joseph Ratzinger, Principles of Catholic Theology, p. 382.)

Does this mean that the Council should be revoked? Certainly not. It means only that the real reception of the Council has not yet even begun. What devastated the Church in the decade after the Council was not the Council but the refusal to accept it. This becomes clear precisely in the history of the influence of Gaudium et spes. What was identified with the Council was, for the most part, the expression of an attitude that did not coincide with the statements to be found in the text itself, although it is recognizable as a tendency in its development and in some of its individual formulations. The task is not, therefore, to suppress the Council but to discover the real Council and to deepen its true intention in the light of the present experience. That means that there can be no return to the Syllabus, which may have marked the first stage in the confrontation with liberalism and a newly conceived Marxism but cannot be the last stage. In the long run, neither embrace nor ghetto can solve for Christians the problem of the modern world. The fact is, as Hans Urs von Balthasar pointed out as early as 1952, that the “demolition of the bastions” is a long-overdue task. (Joseph Ratzinger, Principles of Catholic Theology, p. 391.)

What was once praised by Father Isaac Thomas Hecker and Archbishop John Ireland and James Cardinal Gibbons and Bishop John Keane is still being praised today by the likes of Jorge Mario Bergoglio, “religious liberty” and its “reconciliation to the age,” even though this heresy has helped to turn many baptized Catholics into monsters who make war upon the binding precepts contained in the Divine Positive Law and the Natural Law and upon those conciliar “bishops” who dare to speak out now and again about the evils these monsters have helped to codify under cover of the civil law.

We have reached a situation today where, after over forty years of “dialogue” with Catholic merchants of death in public life on the part of conciliar officials here in the United States of America and elsewhere int he world, the moral monsters of Modernity have been emboldened to lecture the men they accept as their putative shepherds about what they should believe and how they should behave.

Enter once again the egregious pro-abortion, pro-perversity statist enabler of the crimes of the administration of Barack Hussein Obama/Barry Soetoro against both God and man, United States Representative Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi (D-California), the Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives.

Yes, fresh off her reception of the Margaret Sanger Award from the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (see Yet She Will Remain In Good Standing), Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi has taken to lecturing her own conciliar “archbishop,” Salvatore Cordileone, because he is going to participate in the “March for Marriage” in Washington, District of Columbia, which took place on June 19, 2014, the Solemnity of Corpus Christi:

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi took the lead this week in a high-profile lobbying effort to pressure San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone not to attend the controversial March for Marriage event, which she characterized as “venom masquerading as virtue.”

Pelosi, who is one of the country’s most powerful Catholic politicians, made a passionate appeal to the archbishop in a letter obtained by The Chronicle not to participate in the National Organization for Marriage‘s June 19 march on the Supreme Court in Washington.

Cordileone, who is one of the featured speakers at the event, was a leader in the campaign for Proposition 8, the 2008 California anti-gay-marriage initiative.

“We share our love of the Catholic faith and our city of San Francisco,” Pelosi wrote to Cordileone, who, as head of the 560,000-member Archdiocese of San Francisco, has become the Catholic bishops’ point man against gay marriage. She urged him to abandon an event in which some of the participants show “disdain and hate towards LGBT persons.”

Invoking the words of Pope Francis with regard to gays and lesbians, she wrote, “If someone is gay and is searching for the Lord and has good will, then who am I to judge him?”

The goal of the second annual March for Marriage is to draw thousands of supporters of what they call “traditional marriage” to walk from the U.S Capitol to the Supreme Court. Conservative former presidential candidates Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum, as well as Cordileone, are being billed as the star speakers.

The San Francisco Democratic leader is the most influential in a parade of public figures who have come forward to protest the San Francisco archbishop’s participation in an event that is also backed by the Family Research Council. Critics have called the organizers “hate groups” that are targeting gays and lesbians.

Last week, San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, along with a host of Bay Area religious leaders, sent a joint letter to Cordileone protesting his plans to attend the march.

Some 20,000 people have signed an online petition by Faithful America demanding that the archbishop cancel his appearance.

The event comes at a time when same-sex marriage is increasingly common and polls show that public opinion – once widely opposed – has dramatically shifted in recent years. The most recent Gallup poll shows public support for gay marriage at 55 percent, an all-time high.

National leader

Cordileone has nevertheless become a national leader in the religious movement against gay marriage. He heads the Subcommittee for the Promotion and Defense of Marriage for the politically powerful U.S. Conference of Bishops and was instrumental in raising $1.5 million to get Prop. 8, which banned same-sex marriage, on the California ballot in 2008.

The measure has since been ruled unconstitutional, allowing same-sex marriages to be performed in California.

But Cordileone has remained outspoken in his opposition to gay marriage, saying, “The ultimate attack of the evil one is the attack on marriage.”

Public officials, including Pelosi, have expressed respect for the archbishop’s religious views, but have taken particular issue with the organizations sponsoring and participating in the event.

The Family Research Council has been labeled an antigay hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center. It “blamed gay marriage for the recent shootings at Isla Vista,” the Faithful America petition notes.

Defending march

In 2011, the president of the National Organization for Marriage wrote that gay marriage would “normalize pedophilia,” and the organization has also linked gay marriage with incest.

“We ask that you will reconsider your participation and join us in seeking to promote reconciliation rather than division and hatred,” Newsom, Lee and dozens of others wrote in their letter to Cordileone.

Their protest characterized the event as “organized by some of the nation’s most virulently anti-LGBT organizations and leaders.”

Pelosi, in her letter, told Cordileone, “While we may disagree on the subject of marriage equality, we do agree that every person is a child of God, possessed of the spark of divinity and worthy of respect.”

Cordileone has publicly defended next week’s March for Marriage as “an important means to promote and defend marriage for the good of our culture, to pray for our federal and state governments, and to stand in solidarity with people of good will.”

In a letter defending the event, he said, “This is a critical time for marriage in our country, as marriage amendments are being struck down by federal courts and appeals of these decisions are being made.”

Since a 2013 U.S. Supreme Court ruling in support of same-sex couples, gay marriage has been declared legal in 19 states and the District of Columbia. (Nancy Pelosi urges S.F. archbishop to exit marriage march.)

Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi is a monster, one among many, it should noted, who is as been enabled by one conciliar “archbishop” of San Francisco after another for the past twenty-seven years since her first election to serve in the United States House of Representatives. She has been enabled and coddled by one conciliar “archbishop” of Washington, District of Columbia, including the present apostate holding that position, Donald Wuerl, who has said that he would deny Pelosi what purports to be Holy Communion in the Protestant and Judeo-Masonic Novus Ordo liturgical service despite her support for the chemical and surgical assassination of the innocent preborn in their mothers’ wombs and despite her open advocacy in behalf of the agenda of the Homosexual Collective.

Even though there were kings and emperors in the Middle Ages who challenged the temporal and disciplinary powers of the papacy, it was the princes of the German states who aided Martin Luther’s doctrinal revolution against the Divine Plan that God instituted to effect man’s return to Him through the Catholic Church who helped to usher in the sort of absolute despotism that Holy Mother Church’s exercise of the Social Reign of Christ the King sought to curb. These princes cared nothing for Luther’s theology. They did care very much, however, for being able to rule in the sort of amoral manner as described by Niccolo Machiavelli in The Prince and A Discourse on Livy. King Henry VIII (Henry Tudor) took this to the next level when having himself declared Supreme Head of the Church in England in 1534.

Eager to show themselves as “loyal” and fully “assimilated” Americans, many, although certainly not all, of the American bishops in Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries proved themselves be ready lackeys for politicians. This situation had devolved so badly by the early Twentieth Century that James Cardinal Gibbons, the Archbishop of Baltimore from 1877 to 1921, carried water for the anti-Catholic President Thomas Woodrow Wilson during the unjust and immoral “Great War” (World War I) and Francis Cardinal Spellman, the Archbishop of New York from 1939 to 1967, was called “FDR’s errand boy in a miter.” It was thus very logical, as has been demonstrated amply on this site in the past, for the false “bishops” of the counterfeit church of conciliarism to exercise “restraint” when dealing with Catholics in public life who support sins that cry out to Heaven for vengeance.

The refusal of most of the conciliar “bishops” in the United States of America and elsewhere in the world to discipline pro-abortion Catholics in public life is one of the greatest scandals of the counterfeit church of concilairism. It is indeed absolutely indisputable that hundreds of millions of innocent preborn human beings have been killed under cover of the civil law with the full assistance, support and public promotion offered by “Catholics” who have remained in perfectly “good standing” in the counterfeit church of concilairism nevertheless. Look at all of the praise that was given five years ago to the late pro-abort, pro-perversity Edward Moore Kennedy by conciliar “bishops” upon his death on August 25, 2009, the Feast of Saint Louis IX, King of France, and on the day of his Protestant and Judeo-Masonic Novus Ordo “Mass of Christian Burial” (see Another Victim of Americanism, Behold The Free Rein Given to Error, Unfortunate Enough to Be A Baby, Beacon of Social Justice?, Spotlight On The Ordinary, What’s Good For Teddy Is Good For Benny, Sean O’Malley: Coward and Hypocrite, More Rationalizations and Distortions, and Death To Babies: Kennedy’s Continued Legacy.)

Contrary to what “conservative” Catholics in the conciliar structures assert from time to time, it is not “beyond belief” for American “bishops” to keep pro-aborts and pro-peverts in “good standing” as they themselves are not in good standing as members of the Catholic Church. They are members false church with false beliefs and a profane liturgy (at least in its alleged Latin Rite) that offends God greatly. These men have r has no concept of the horror of personal sin, thus showing themselves to have no sense at all of what Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ suffered in His Sacred Humanity during His Passion and Death because of our sins.

As noted earlier, the friend of explicit classroom instruction in matters pertaining to the Sixth and Ninth Commandments, Donald Wuerl, the conciliar “archbishop” of Washington, District of Columbia, does not deny the pro-abort, pro-perversity Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi what purports to be Holy Communion in the Protestant and Masonic Novus Ordo worship service. Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi, whose father was a member of the United States House of Representatives from the State of Maryland from 1939 to 1947 and then Mayor of the City of Baltimore, Maryland, from 1947 to 1959, remains a “Catholic” in “good standing” in the structures of the counterfeit church of conciliarism who has been bold enough to “thank God” for a version of ObamaCare that does not threaten “abortion rights.”

Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi does not care that the Second Person of the Most Blessed Trinity became Man in Our Lady’s Virginal and Immaculate Womb by the power of the Third Person of the Most Blessed Trinity, God the Holy Ghost, and that He spent nine months as a helpless preborn Baby. She does not care that Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, He Who is the Lord of history, knew from all eternity that preborn babies would be killed under cover of the civil law with her own support and participation as a public servant. She does not care that Our Lord is indeed in solidarity with every child in every mother’s womb and that to directly intend to attack one innocent child in his mother’s womb is to commit an attack mystically upon Our Lord Himself. She cares about none of this. Like so many of other fellow “Catholics” in the conciliar structures who support one grave evil after another under cover of the civil law, Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi has been enabled and protected time and time again by the “bishops” of the counterfeit church of conciliarism.

How much more innocent blood needs to be shed until the lot of Catholic pro-abortion politicians is banished from the One World Church of conciliarism? Indeed, it is because the “popes” of this One World Church believe in “dialogue” and “persuasion” that they have not addressed pro-abortion Catholic politicians in these stirring words of Pope Pius XI:

“Those who hold the reins of government should not forget that it is the duty of public authority by appropriate laws and sanctions to defend the lives of the innocent, and this all the more so since those whose lives are endangered and assailed cannot defend themselves. Among whom we must mention in the first place infants hidden in the mother’s womb. And if the public magistrates not only do not defend them, but by their laws and ordinances betray them to death at the hands of doctors or of others, let them remember that God is the Judge and Avenger of innocent blood which cried from earth to Heaven.” (Pope Pius XI, Casti Connubii, December 30, 1930.)

Anyone who knows anything about my writing over the years knows that, despite my abandoning my “conservative” papalotry and then my “indulterer” and “resist and recognize ways, there has been absolute consistency on the insistence that Catholics in public life who support the deliberate, direct, intentional taking of innocent preborn human life have expelled themselves from the Catholic Church. Admittedly written at a time I believed the conciliar authorities to hold ecclesiastical office legitimately, one of my articles in The Wanderer in this vein in the 1990s was entitled, “Excommunicate Them All.” That article was simply one of many over the years. My current criticism of men I now realize to be pretenders to ecclesiastical office for their refusal to discipline pro-abortion Catholic politicians is nothing new, therefore.

Although my embrace of sedevacantism has been only within the past eight years, I have been quite consistent throughout the course of my teaching and speaking and writing careers in explaining that it is impossible for one to support abortion, whether by chemical or surgical means, under cover of the civil law and remain a member of the Catholic Church, making frequent advertence to this injunction contained in Pope Leo XIII’s Immortale Dei, November 1, 1885:

Hence, lest concord be broken by rash charges, let this be understood by all, that the integrity of Catholic faith cannot be reconciled with opinions verging on naturalism or rationalism, the essence of which is utterly to do away with Christian institutions and to install in society the supremacy of man to the exclusion of God. Further, it is unlawful to follow one line of conduct in private life and another in public, respecting privately the authority of the Church, but publicly rejecting it; for this would amount to joining together good and evil, and to putting man in conflict with himself; whereas he ought always to be consistent, and never in the least point nor in any condition of life to swerve from Christian virtue.

The spiritual robber barons who have enabled and protected the likes of Nancy Pelosi are not members of the Catholic Church. Neither is Pelosi, who has expelled herself from the bosom of Holy Mother Church by means of her supporting the direct, intentional killing of innocent babies by chemical and surgical means under the cover of the civil law.

Alas, it is a grace to be able to recognize these truths and then to act upon it. As I have noted in other articles, although the late Mario Francesco “Cardinal” Pompedda, the former head of the Apostolic Signatura for the conciliar church, did not believe that the canonical doctrine of sedevacantism applied to the “papacy” of Karol Wojtyla/John Paul II, he did state that sedevacantism is indeed the canonical doctrine of the Catholic Church:

It is true that the canonical doctrine states that the see would be vacant in the case of heresy. … But in regard to all else, I think what is applicable is what judgment regulates human acts. And the act of will, namely a resignation or capacity to govern or not govern, is a human act. (Cardinal Says Pope Could Govern Even If Unable to Speak, Zenit, February 8, 2005.)

No, the belief that those who fall from the Faith cannot hold ecclesiastical office is not held merely by the “nutty” sedevacantists. Mario “Cardinal” Pompedda stated that it is the canonical doctrine of the Church that the see of Peter “would be vacant in the case of heresy.” So much for some of the current efforts to disprove that sedevacantism is even a possibility at any time, no less that it applies at this time, which is a judgment that one must make in the practical order about whether claimants of ecclesiastical office have defected from the Faith by virtue of violating the Divine Positive Law, thereby falling into the category of heretics described by Pope Leo XIII in Satis Cognitum, June 29, 1896:

The Church, founded on these principles and mindful of her office, has done nothing with greater zeal and endeavour than she has displayed in guarding the integrity of the faith. Hence she regarded as rebels and expelled from the ranks of her children all who held beliefs on any point of doctrine different from her own. The Arians, the Montanists, the Novatians, the Quartodecimans, the Eutychians, did not certainly reject all Catholic doctrine: they abandoned only a certain portion of it. Still who does not know that they were declared heretics and banished from the bosom of the Church? In like manner were condemned all authors of heretical tenets who followed them in subsequent ages. “There can be nothing more dangerous than those heretics who admit nearly the whole cycle of doctrine, and yet by one word, as with a drop of poison, infect the real and simple faith taught by our Lord and handed down by Apostolic tradition” (Auctor Tract. de Fide Orthodoxa contra Arianos).

The practice of the Church has always been the same, as is shown by the unanimous teaching of the Fathers, who were wont to hold as outside Catholic communion, and alien to the Church, whoever would recede in the least degree from any point of doctrine proposed by her authoritative Magisterium. Epiphanius, Augustine, Theodore :, drew up a long list of the heresies of their times. St. Augustine notes that other heresies may spring up, to a single one of which, should any one give his assent, he is by the very fact cut off from Catholic unity. “No one who merely disbelieves in all (these heresies) can for that reason regard himself as a Catholic or call himself one. For there may be or may arise some other heresies, which are not set out in this work of ours, and, if any one holds to one single one of these he is not a Catholic” (S. Augustinus, De Haeresibus, n. 88).

Well, I think it prudent, wise and necessary to call upon three popes named Pius at this juncture:

80. The Roman Pontiff can, and ought to, reconcile himself, and come to terms with progress, liberalism and modern civilization.- -Allocution “Jamdudum cernimus,” March 18, 1861. (Pope Pius IX, The Syllabus of Errors, December 8, 1864.)

It is thus, Venerable Brethren, that for the Modernists, whether as authors or propagandists, there is to be nothing stable, nothing immutable in the Church. Nor, indeed, are they without forerunners in their doctrines, for it was of these that Our predecessor Pius IX wrote: ‘These enemies of divine revelation extol human progress to the skies, and with rash and sacrilegious daring would have it introduced into the Catholic religion as if this religion were not the work of God but of man, or some kind of philosophical discovery susceptible of perfection by human efforts.’ On the subject of revelation and dogma in particular, the doctrine of the Modernists offers nothing new. We find it condemned in the Syllabus of Pius IX, where it is enunciated in these terms: ”Divine revelation is imperfect, and therefore subject to continual and indefinite progress, corresponding with the progress of human reason’; and condemned still more solemnly in the Vatican Council: ”The doctrine of the faith which God has revealed has not been proposed to human intelligences to be perfected by them as if it were a philosophical system, but as a divine deposit entrusted to the Spouse of Christ to be faithfully guarded and infallibly interpreted. Hence also that sense of the sacred dogmas is to be perpetually retained which our Holy Mother the Church has once declared, nor is this sense ever to be abandoned on plea or pretext of a more profound comprehension of the truth.’ Nor is the development of our knowledge, even concerning the faith, barred by this pronouncement; on the contrary, it is supported and maintained. For the same Council continues: ‘Let intelligence and science and wisdom, therefore, increase and progress abundantly and vigorously in individuals, and in the mass, in the believer and in the whole Church, throughout the ages and the centuries — but only in its own kind, that is, according to the same dogma, the same sense, the same acceptation.’ (Pope Saint Pius X, Pascendi Dominci Gregis, September 8, 1907.)

Moreover they assert that when Catholic doctrine has been reduced to this condition, a way will be found to satisfy modern needs, that will permit of dogma being expressed also by the concepts of modern philosophy, whether of immanentism or idealism or existentialism or any other system. Some more audacious affirm that this can and must be done, because they hold that the mysteries of faith are never expressed by truly adequate concepts but only by approximate and ever changeable notions, in which the truth is to some extent expressed, but is necessarily distorted. Wherefore they do not consider it absurd, but altogether necessary, that theology should substitute new concepts in place of the old ones in keeping with the various philosophies which in the course of time it uses as its instruments, so that it should give human expression to divine truths in various ways which are even somewhat opposed, but still equivalent, as they say. They add that the history of dogmas consists in the reporting of the various forms in which revealed truth has been clothed, forms that have succeeded one another in accordance with the different teachings and opinions that have arisen over the course of the centuries. (Pope Pius XII, Humani Generis, August 12, 1950.)

The lords of conciliarism and their Americanist predecessors in the Catholic Church helped to create the moral monsters of Modernity, men and and women who believe that they can bully, browbeat, threaten and intimidate their ostensible “shepherds” to the “reconciled” to the “age” in which “the people in the pew” no longer find the concept of eternally binding moral truths acceptable. Bullies, burdened by a guilty conscience, demand that others agree with them and that those who don’t are either mentally disturbed or socially backward, and thus must be pummeled verbally until that which they seek to control, the binding precepts of the Divine Positive Law and the Natural Law in this instance, is brought into accordance with their own desires.

As is all the case with each of the other moral monsters who have been created by Americanism and nurtured by the lords of Modernity, Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi wants to silence all possible opposition to what she thinks is “correct” from those she believes to be, falsely, of course, officials of the Catholic Church. Sin thus must be suborned in the name of “human rights” by these moral monsters of Modernity while those who seek to “judge” them are called “hypocrites by none other than Jorge Mario Bergoglio himself, who just yesterday condemned “hypocrites” once again. (No one can judge.)

Well, there is just a bit of inconsistency on the part of the false “pontiff” as he just condemned the Mafia in southern Italy. Who is he to judge these killers? Why does he condemn them and not the likes of Nancy Patricia D’Alesandro Pelosi and Joseph Robinette Biden, Jr., and John F. Kerry and Francois Hollande, et al.? Why all the smiley faces with Barack Hussein Obama/Barry Soetoro. Indeed, who is he to judge the Franciscan Friars of the Immaculate and the Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate and all of those he denounces regularly as “restorationists,” “Pharisees,” “triumphalists,” “Pelagians” and “joyless” Catholics?

Men, though, who have fallen the Faith and who are murderers of souls as they blaspheme the Most Blessed Trinity and spread heresies abroad can never quite bring themselves to criticize, no less discipline, their kindred spirits in the realm of the secular world. It is enough to “show mercy” to them as they are, of course, “for the poor.”

Guess what, however, Saint John the Baptist, who was born on these very day, judged King Herod the Tetrarch, being willing to lose his very head to stand speak forcefully to a bigamous and adulterous civil potentate. He judged Herod the Tetrarch and urged him to quit his sins. It is precisely because the monsters of Modernity have been enabled by the lords of Modernism in the counterfeit church of conciliarism that anyone who dares to speak as did Saint John the Baptist is considered to be “out of touch” with “the age.”

May we keep close to Our Lady during this Octave of Corpus Christi as we prepare for the coming feast of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Which was formed out of her own Immaculate Heart. Every Rosary we pray with fervor and meditation helps to console the good God and to plant seeds for the conversion of souls.

May this day of the Feast of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist help us to be heralds of Christ the King, Whose Social Kingship is despised by the lords of Modernity today and has been rejected and scoffed at by the lords of Modernism, who dare to assert that their conciliar revolution has been a “new Pentecost” despite the wreckage of souls that it has produced and despite the fact that evil is more and more enshrined in our civil laws and glorified in what passes for our popular contrast.

To Christ the King be the victory through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary and her Fatima Message.

Isn’t it time to pray a Rosary now?

Vivat Christus Rex! Viva Cristo Rey!

Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us now and at the hour of our death.

Saint Joseph, pray for us.

Saints Peter and Paul, pray for us.

Saint John the Baptist, pray for us.

Saint John the Evangelist, pray for us.

Saint Michael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Gabriel the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Raphael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saints Joachim and Anne, pray for us.

 

June 22, 2014, Article

June 22, 2014, Sunday within the Octave of Corpus Christi (the Second Sunday after Pentecost):

Although I am going to get to other work this coming week, the conciiarists keep getting in the way of my doing so.

Today’s article is a follow-up to Friday’s article, Where the Absurd Is A Normal Way of Life. The current article, The English and Irish Martyrs Died for This?, serves principally as a reference resource to demonstrate the logical progression of false ecumenism with the Anglican sect into a morass of gooey syncretism. None of this can come from the Catholic Church. None of this has ever been sanctioned by any true pope or any of Holy Mother Church’s twenty true councils.

Apostasy is here. Do you care? Can Holy Mother Church give us a little bit of truth and lots of error or lots of truth and a little bit of error? Never! She is the spotless, virginal Mystical Spouse of her Divine Founder, Invisible Head and Mystical Bridegroom.

Tomorrow’s article will be a review of yet another “unofficial” and “non-binding” statement of the International Theological Commission, which works as an intergalactic satellite of the Conciliar Congregation for the Desrtuction, Deformation and Deconstruction of the Catholic Faith,  that will be cited endlessly as part of the “official” and “binding” teaching of the counterfeit church of conciliarism. This new statement is a redefinition of the sensus fidei that the conciliar revolutionaries meant to destroy and replace with a synthetic sense of the faith. The new statement is merely an apologia for what is already a fait accompli: a new sensus fidei for a new religion with new liturgical rites and new pastoral practices and new canon law.

Finally, I ask your prayers today for my fellow classmates from the Class of 1969 of Oyster Bay High School as it was forty-five years ago today that our graduation took place. I remember many of my classmates in my prayers each day. The passage of time and the divisions that been wrought by the forces of Modernity and Modernism have seen once close friendships come to an end or simply just fade away.

All of that really does not matter, though. What matters is to pray that all of those whom God’s Holy Providence has placed in our lives will be converted to the true Catholic Faith before they die so that they can persist in the bosom of Holy Mother Church to the point that they are called to make an accounting of their lives at the moment of their Particular Judgment. We must be making constant preparations ourselves for that fearful moment.

Our Lady of the Rosary, pray for us.

Saint Paulinus of Nola, pray for us.

The English and Irish Martyrs Died For This?

The constraints of time kept Where the Absurd Is A Normal Way of Life of relatively length, at least by the standards of this site. I thought it useful to amplify a few points in order to illustrate that what Jorge Mario Bergoglio did five days ago when permitting himself  to be “blessed” by an Anglican layman, Justin Welby, is just a logical progression of events from the time that Giovanni Eugenio Antonio Maria Montini/Paul the Sick presented his episcopal ring from his time of the Archbishop of Milan to layman Michael Ramsey on March 23, 1966.

Each of these steps by the conciliar “popes” to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with their brothers in heresy from the heretical and schismatic Anglican sect have defamed the English and Irish Martyrs who chose death rather than to give any credence at all to a false church that was formed by a lustful, adulterous and bigamous king. The blood of these brave martyrs for Christ the King and His true Church must be forgotten as part of the “purification of the memory of the past” that none other than “Saint John Paul II” said was necessary to move beyond “divisions” that, according to Jorge Mario Bergoglio earlier this week, are “scandalous.”

Although a number of “joint declarations” will be review in the body of this article and two others appended at the end, a review of  the first two “joint declarations”–and a 1982 “papal” address delivered in the Canterbury Cathedral–made in 1977 and 1982 by the heretical and schismatic “archbishops” of Canterbury and their partners in heresy from the counterfeit church of conciliarism will demonstrate the “evolution,” if you will, in the direction of the obliteration of the Divine Constitution of Holy Mother Church in favor of the “new ecclesiology,” replete as it is with its “partial communion” heresy.

The first of the delcarations below was issued by the soon-to-be “Blessed Paul the Sick” [October 19, 2014, is less than four months away now] and the then layman posing as a successor of Saint Augustine of Canterbury, Dr. Donald Coggans:

1. After four hundred years of estrangement, it is now the third time in seventeen years that an Archbishop of Canterbury and the Pope embrace in Christian friendship in the city of Rome. Since the visit of Archbishop Ramsey eleven years have passed, and much has happened in that time to fulfil the hopes then expressed and to cause us to thank God.

2. As the Roman Catholic Church and the constituent Churches of the Anglican Communion have sought to grow in mutual understanding and Christian love, they have come to recognize, to value and to give thanks for a common faith in God our Father, in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit; our common baptism into Christ; our sharing of the Holy Scriptures, of the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds, the Chalcedonian definition, and the teaching of the Fathers; our common Christian inheritance for many centuries with its living traditions of liturgy, theology, spirituality and mission.

3. At the same time in fulfilment of the pledge of eleven years ago to ‘a serious dialogue which, founded on the Gospels and on the ancient common traditions, may lead to that unity in truth, for which Christ prayed’ (Common Declaration, 1966) Anglican and Roman Catholic theologians have faced calmly and objectively the historical and doctrinal differences which have divided us. Without compromising their respective allegiances, they have addressed these problems together, and in the process they have discovered theological convergences often as unexpected as they were happy.

4. The Anglican – Roman Catholic International Commission has produced three documents: on the Eucharist, on Ministry and Ordination and on Church and Authority. We now recommend that the work it has begun be pursued, through the procedures appropriate to our respective Communions, so that both of them may be led along the path towards unity.

The moment will shortly come when the respective Authorities must evaluate the conclusions.

5. The response of both Communions to the work and fruits of theological dialogue will be measured by the practical response of the faithful to the task of restoring unity, which as the Second Vatican Council says ‘involves the whole Church, faithful and clergy alike’ and ‘extends to everyone according to the talents of each’ (Unitatis Redintegratio, para. 5). We rejoice that this practical response has manifested itself in so many forms of pastoral cooperation in many parts of the world; in meetings of bishops, clergy and faithful.

6. In mixed marriages between Anglicans and Roman Catholics, where the tragedy of our separation at the sacrament of union is seen most starkly, cooperation in pastoral care (Matrimonia Mixta, para. 14) in many places has borne fruit in increased understanding. Serious dialogue has cleared away many misconceptions and shown that we still share much that is deep-rooted in the Christian tradition and ideal of marriage, though important differences persist, particularly regarding remarriage after divorce. We are following attentively the work thus far accomplished in this dialogue by the Joint Commission on the Theology of Marriage and its Application to Mixed Marriages. It has stressed the need for fidelity and witness to the ideal of marriage, set forth in the New Testament and constantly taught in Christian tradition. We have a common duty to defend this tradition and ideal and the moral values which derive from it.

7. All such cooperation, which must continue to grow and spread, is the true setting for continued dialogue and for the general extension and appreciation of its fruits, and so for progress towards that goal which is Christ’s will – the restoration of complete communion in faith and sacramental life.

8. Our call to this is one with the sublime Christian vocation itself, which is a call to communion; as St. John says, ‘that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you may have fellowship with us; and our fellowship is with the Father and His Son Jesus Christ’ (1 John 1:3). If we are to maintain progress in doctrinal convergence and move forward resolutely to the communion of mind and heart for which Christ prayed we must ponder still further his intentions in founding the Church and face courageously their requirements.

9. It is their communion with God in Christ through faith and through baptism and self-giving to Him that stands at the centre of our witness to the world, even while between us communion remains imperfect. Our divisions hinder this witness, hinder the work of Christ (Evangelii Nuntiandi, para. 77) but they do not close all roads we may travel together. In a spirit of prayer and of submission to God’s will we must collaborate more earnestly in a ‘greater common witness to Christ before the world in the very work of evangelization’ (Evangelii Nuntiandi, ibid.). It is our desire that the means of this collaboration be sought: the increasing spiritual hunger in all parts of God’s world invites us to such a common pilgrimage.

This collaboration, pursued to the limit allowed by truth and loyalty, will create the climate in which dialogue and doctrinal convergence can bear fruit. While this fruit is ripening, serious obstacles remain both of the past and of recent origin. Many in both communions are asking themselves whether they have a common faith sufficient to be translated into communion of life, worship and mission. Only the communions themselves through their pastoral authorities can give that answer. When the moment comes to do so, may the answer shine through in spirit and in truth, not obscured by the enmities, the prejudices and the suspicions of the past.

10. To this we are bound to look forward and to spare no effort to bring it closer: to be baptized into Christ is to be baptized into hope – ‘and hope does not disappoint us because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit which has been given us’ (Rom 5:5).

11. Christian hope manifests itself in prayer and action – in prudence but also in courage. We pledge ourselves and exhort the faithful of the Roman Catholic Church and of the Anglican Communion to live and work courageously in this hope of reconciliation and unity in our common Lord.

Donald Cantuar Paulus PP. VI, April 29, 1977 (Common Declaration – April 1977.)

The English and Irish Martyrs died for this?

The antidote to this?

Among those who did so were Pope Pius IX Pope Pius XII, each of whom stated clearly the true teaching of the Catholic Church concerning her own identity as the one and only Church of Christ to which all must belong:

“It is for this reason that so many who do not share ‘the communion and the truth of the Catholic Church’ must make use of the occasion of the Council, by the means of the Catholic Church, which received in Her bosom their ancestors, proposes [further] demonstration of profound unity and of firm vital force; hear the requirements [demands] of her heart, they must engage themselves to leave this state that does not guarantee for them the security of salvation. She does not hesitate to raise to the Lord of mercy most fervent prayers to tear down of the walls of division, to dissipate the haze of errors, and lead them back within holy Mother Church, where their Ancestors found salutary pastures of life; where, in an exclusive way, is conserved and transmitted whole the doctrine of Jesus Christ and wherein is dispensed the mysteries of heavenly grace.

“It is therefore by force of the right of Our supreme Apostolic ministry, entrusted to us by the same Christ the Lord, which, having to carry out with [supreme] participation all the duties of the good Shepherd and to follow and embrace with paternal love all the men of the world, we send this Letter of Ours to all the Christians from whom We are separated, with which we exhort them warmly and beseech them with insistence to hasten to return to the one fold of Christ; we desire in fact from the depths of the heart their salvation in Christ Jesus, and we fear having to render an account one day to Him, Our Judge, if, through some possibility, we have not pointed out and prepared the way for them to attain eternal salvation. In all Our prayers and supplications, with thankfulness, day and night we never omit to ask for them, with humble insistence, from the eternal Shepherd of souls the abundance of goods and heavenly graces. And since, if also, we fulfill in the earth the office of vicar, with all our heart we await with open arms the return of the wayward sons to the Catholic Church, in order to receive them with infinite fondness into the house of the Heavenly Father and to enrich them with its inexhaustible treasures. By our greatest wish for the return to the truth and the communion with the Catholic Church, upon which depends not only the salvation of all of them, but above all also of the whole Christian society: the entire world in fact cannot enjoy true peace if it is not of one fold and one shepherd.” (Pope Pius IX, Iam Vos Omnes, September 13, 1868.)

Actually only those are to be included as members of the Church who have been baptized and profess the true faith, and who have not been so unfortunate as to separate themselves from the unity of the Body, or been excluded by legitimate authority for grave faults committed. “For in one spirit” says the Apostle, “were we all baptized into one Body, whether Jews or Gentiles, whether bond or free.” As therefore in the true Christian community there is only one Body, one Spirit, one Lord, and one Baptism, so there can be only one faith. And therefore, if a man refuse to hear the Church, let him be considered – so the Lord commands – as a heathen and a publican. It follows that those who are divided in faith or government cannot be living in the unity of such a Body, nor can they be living the life of its one Divine Spirit. (Pope Pius XII, Mystici Corporis, June 29, 1943.)

The Anglicans belong to a false church. Then again, so have the conciliar “popes” as their counterfeit church of conciliarism is not the Catholic Church.

It was five years after the 1977 “joint declaration” that “Saint John Paul II” delivered an exhortation in behalf of “unity” at Canterbury Cathedral, thereby signifying what was thought to be the Catholic Church’s formal recognition of Anglican ownership of a cathedral stolen by the heretics and schismatics in the Sixteenth Century:

1. The passages which Archbishop Runcie and I have just read are taken from the Gospel according to John and contain the words of our Lord Jesus Christ on the eve of his Passion. While he was at supper with his disciples, he prayed: “that they may all be one; even as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that thou hast sent me” (Io. 17, 21).

These words are marked in a particular way by the Paschal Mystery of our Saviour, by his Passion, death and Resurrection. Though pronounced once only, they endure throughout all generations. Christ prays unceasingly for the unity of his Church, because he loves her with the same love with which he loved the apostles and disciples who were with him at the Last Supper. “I do not pray for these only, but also for those who believe in me through their word” (Ibid. 17, 20). Christ reveals a divine perspective in which the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit are present. Present also is the most profound mystery of the Church: the unity in love which exists between the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit penetrates to the heart of the people whom God has chosen to be his own, and is the source of their unity.

Christ’s words resound in a special way today in this hallowed Cathedral which recalls the figure of the great missionary Saint Augustine whom Pope Gregory the Great sent forth so that through his words the sons and daughters of England might believe in Christ.

Dear brethren, all of us have become particularly sentitive to these words of the priestly prayer of Christ. The Church of our time is the Church which participates in a particular way in the prayer of Christ for unity and which seeks the ways of unity, obedient to the Spirit who speaks in the words of the Lord. We desire to be obedient, especially today, on this historic day which centuries and generations have awaited. We desire to be obedient to him whom Christ calls the Spirit of truth.

2. On the feast of Pentecost last year Catholics and Anglicans joined with Orthodox and Protestants, both in Rome and in Constantinople, in commemorating the First Council of Constantinople by professing their common faith in the Holy Spirit, the Lord and Giver of life. Once again on this vigil of the great feast of Pentecost, we are gathered in prayer to implore our heavenly Father to pour out anew the Holy Spirit, the Spirit of Christ, upon his Church. For it is the Church which, in the words of that Council’s Creed, we profess to be the work par excellence of the Holy Spirit when we say “we believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic church”.

Today’s Gospel passages have called attention in particular to two aspects of the gift of the Holy Spirit which Jesus invoked upon his disciples: he is the Spirit of truth and the Spirit of unity. On the first Pentecost day, the Holy Spirit descended on that small band of disciples to confirm them in the truth of God’s salvation of the world through the death and Resurrection of his Son, and to unite them into the one Body of Christ, which is the Church. Thus we know that when we pray “that all may be one” as Jesus and his Father are one, it is precisely in order that “the world may believe” and by this faith be saved (Cfr. Io. 17, 21). For our faith can be none other than the faith of Pentecost, the faith in which the Apostles were confirmed by the Spirit of truth. We believe that the Risen Lord has authority to save us from sin and the powers of darkness. We believe, too, that we are called to “become one body, one spirit in Christ” (Prex Eucharistica III).

3. In a few moments we shall renew our baptismal vows together. We intend to perform this ritual, which we share in common as Anglicans and Catholics, as a clear testimony to the one sacrament of Baptism by which we have been joined to Christ. At the same time we are humbly mindful that the faith of the Church to which we appeal is not without the marks of our separation. Together we shall renew our renunciation of sin in order to make it clear that we believe that Jesus Christ has overcome the powerful hold of Satan upon “the world” (Io. 14, 17). We shall profess anew our intention to turn away from all that is evil and to turn towards God who is the author of all that is good and the source of all that is holy. As we again make our profession of faith in the triune God – Father, Son and Holy Spirit – we find great hope in the promise of Jesus: “The Counsellor, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, he will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you” (Ibid. 14, 26). Christ’s promise gives us confidence in the power of this same Holy Spirit to heal the divisions introduced into the Church in the course of the centuries since that first Pentecost day. In this way the renewal of our baptismal vows will become a pledge to do all in our power to cooperate with the grace of the Holy Spirit, who alone can lead us to the day when we will profess the fullness of our faith together.

4. We can be confident in adressing our prayer for unity to the Holy Spirit today, for according to Christ’s promise the Spirit, the Counsellor, will be with us for ever (Cfr. ibid. 14, 16). It was with confidence that Archbishop Fisher made bold to visit Pope John XXIII at the time of the Second Vatican Council, and that Archbishops Ramsey and Coggan came to visit Pope Paul VI. It is with no less confidence that I have responded to the promptings of the Holy Spirit to be with you today at Canterbury.

5. My dear brothers and sisters of the Anglican Communion, “whom I love and long for” (Phil. 4, 1), how happy I am to be able to speak directly to you today in this great Cathedral! The building itself is an eloquent witness both to our long years of common inheritance and to the sad years of division that followed. Beneath this roof Saint Thomas Becket suffered martyrdom. Here too we recall Augustine and Dunstan and Anselm and all those monks who gave such diligent service in this church. The great events of salvation history are retold in the ancient stained glass windows above us. And we have venerated here the manuscript of the Gospels sent from Rome to Canterbury thirteen hundred years ago. Encouraged by the witness of so many who have professed their faith in Jesus Christ through the centuries – often at the cost of their own lives a sacrifice which even today is asked of not a few, as the new chapel we shall visit reminds us – I appeal to you in this holy place, all my fellow Christians, and especially the members of the Church of England and the members of the Anglican Communion throughout the world, to accept the commitment to which Archbishop Runcie and I pledge ourselves anew before you today. This commitment is that of praying and working for reconciliation and ecclesial unity according to the mind and heart of our Saviour Jesus Christ.

6. On this first visit of a Pope to Canterbury, I come to you in love – the love of Peter to whom the Lord said, “I have prayed for you that your faith may not fail; and when you have turned again, strengthen your brethren” (Luc. 22, 32). I come to you also in the love of Gregory, who sent Saint Augustine to this place to give the Lord’s flock a shepherd’s care (Cfr. 1 Petr. 5, 2). Just as every minister of the Gospel must do, so today I echo the words of the Master: “I am among you as one who serves” (Luc. 22, 27). With me I bring to you, beloved brothers and sisters of the Anglican Communion, the hopes and the desires, the prayers and good will of all who are united with the Church of Rome, which from earliest times was said to “preside in love” (S. IGNATII ANTIOCHENI Ad Romanos, Prooem.).

7. In a few moments Archbishop Runcie will join me in reading a Common Declaration, in which we give recognition to the steps we have already taken along the path of unity, and state the plans we propose and the hopes we entertain for the next stage of our common pilgrimage. And yet these hopes and plans will come to nothing if our striving for unity is not rooted in our union with God; for Jesus said, “In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you. He who has my commandments and keeps them, he it is who loves me; and he who loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love him and manifest myself to him” (Io. 14, 20-21). This love of God is poured out upon us in the person of the Holy Spirit, the Spirit of truth and of unity. Let us open ourselves to his powerful love, as we pray that, speaking the truth in love, we may all grow up in every way into him who is the head, into our Lord Jesus Christ (Cfr. Eph. 4, 15). May the dialogue we have begun lead us to the day of full restoration of unity in faith and love.

8. On the eve of his Passion, Jesus told his disciples: “If you love me, you will keep my commandments” (Io. 14, 15). We have felt compelled to come together here today in obedience to the great commandment: the commandment of love. We wish to embrace it in its entirety, to live by it completely, and to experience the power of this commandment in conformity with the words of the Master: “I will pray the Father, and he will give you another Counsellor, to be with you for ever, even the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees him nor knows him; you know him, for he dwells with you, and will be in you” (Ibid. 14, 16-17).

Love grows by means of truth, and truth draws near to man by means of love. Mindful of this, I lift up to the Lord this prayer: O Christ, may all that is part of today’s encounter be born of the Spirit of truth and be made fruitful through love.

Behold before us: the past and the future!

Behold before us: the desires of so many hearts!

You, who are the Lord of history and the Lord of human hearts, be with us! Christ Jesus, eternal Son of God, be with us! Amen. (Ecumenical Celebration Canterbury Cathedral, May 29, 1982.)

Almost thirteen years to the day before the issuance of his heretical Ut Unum Sint, “Saint John Paul II” was babbling blaspheming God the Holy Ghost by misusing Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ’s Prayer at the Last Supper. The misuse of “that they may all be one” has long been the linchpin of the so-called “ecumenical movement,” tied in as it was to the hijacked Liturgical Movement that resulted ultimately in that vessel of Modernism, the Protestant and Judeo-Masonic Novus Ordo liturgical service.  The antidote to this will be provided following the text of the 1982 “joint declaration:”

1. In the Cathedral Church of Christ at Canterbury the Pope and the Archbishop of Canterbury have met on the eve of Pentecost to offer thanks to God for the progress that has been made in the work of reconciliation between our Communions. Together with leaders of other Christian Churches and Communities we have listened to the Word of God; together we have recalled our one baptism and renewed the promises then made; together we have acknowledged the witness given by those whose faith has led them to surrender the precious gift of life itself in the service of others, both in the past and in modern times.

2. The bond of our common baptism into Christ led our predecessors to inaugurate a serious dialogue between our Churches, a dialogue founded on the Gospels and the ancient common traditions, a dialogue which has as its goal the unity for which Christ prayed to his Father “so that the world may know that thou has sent me and hast loved them even as thou hast loved me”. In 1966, our predecessors Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey made a Common Declaration announcing their intention to inaugurate a serious dialogue between the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion which would “include not only theological matters such as Scripture, Tradition and Liturgy, but also matters of practical difficulty felt on either side”. After this dialogue had already produced three statements on Eucharist, Ministry and Ordination, and Authority in the Church, Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Donald Coggan, in their Common Declaration in 1977, took the occasion to encourage the completion of the dialogue on these three important questions so that the Commission’s conclusions might be evaluated by the respective Authorities through procedures appropriate to each Communion. The Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission has now completed the task assigned to it with the publication of its Final Report, and as our two Communions proceed with the necessary evaluation, we join in thanking the members of the Commission for their dedication, scholarship and integrity in a long and demanding task undertaken for love of Christ and for the unity of his Church.

3. The completion of this Commission’s work bids us look to the next stage of our common pilgrimage in faith and hope towards the unity for which we long. We are agreed that it is now time to set up a new international Commission. Its task will be to continue the work already begun: to examine, especially in the light of our respective judgments on the Final Report, the outstanding doctrinal differences which still separate us, with a view towards their eventual resolution; to study all that hinders the mutual recognition of the ministries of our Communions; and to recommend what practical steps will be necessary when, on the basis of our unity in faith, we are able to proceed to the restoration of full communion. We are well aware that this new Commission’s task will not be easy, but we are encouraged by our reliance on the grace of God and by all that we have seen of the power of that grace in the ecumenical movement of our time.

4. While this necessary work of theological clarification continues, it must be accompanied by the zealous work and fervent prayer of Roman Catholics and Anglicans throughout the world as they seek to grow in mutual understanding, fraternal love and common witness to the Gospel. Once more, then, we call on the bishops, clergy and faithful people of both our Communions in every country, diocese and parish in which our faithful live side by side. We urge them all to pray for this work and to adopt every possible means of furthering it through their collaboration in deepening their allegiance to Christ and in witnessing to him before the world. Only by such collaboration and prayer can the memory of the past enmities be healed and our past antagonisms overcome.

5. Our aim is not limited to the union of our two Communions alone, to the exclusion of other Christians, but rather extends to the fulfilment of God’s will for the visible unity of all his people.

Both in our present dialogue, and in those engaged in by other Christians among themselves and with us, we recognize in the agreements we are able to reach, as well as in the difficulties which we encounter, a renewed challenge to abandon ourselves completely to the truth of the Gospel. Hence we are happy to make this Declaration today in the welcome presence of so many fellow Christians whose Churches and Communities are already partners with us in prayer and work for the unity of all.

6. With them we wish to serve the cause of peace, of human freedom and human dignity, so that God may indeed be glorified in all his creatures. With them we greet in the name of God all men of good will, both those who believe in him and those who are still searching for him.

7. This holy place reminds us of the vision of Pope Gregory in sending St. Augustine as an apostle to England, full of zeal for the preaching of the Gospel and the shepherding of the flock. On this eve of Pentecost, we turn again in prayer to Jesus, the Good Shepherd, who promised to ask the Father to give us another Advocate to be with us for ever, the Spirit of truth, to lead us to the full unity to which he calls us. Confident in the power of this same Holy Spirit, we commit ourselves anew to the task of working for unity with firm faith, renewed hope and ever deeper love. (Joint declaration of the Holy Father John Paul II and the Archbishop of Canterbury, May 29, 1982.)

Pope Pius XI explained where all of this false ecumenism would lead: the destruction of Catholic doctrine:

4. Is it not right, it is often repeated, indeed, even consonant with duty, that all who invoke the name of Christ should abstain from mutual reproaches and at long last be united in mutual charity? Who would dare to say that he loved Christ, unless he worked with all his might to carry out the desires of Him, Who asked His Father that His disciples might be “one.”[1] And did not the same Christ will that His disciples should be marked out and distinguished from others by this characteristic, namely that they loved one another: “By this shall all men know that you are my disciples, if you have love one for another“?[2] All Christians, they add, should be as “one”: for then they would be much more powerful in driving out the pest of irreligion, which like a serpent daily creeps further and becomes more widely spread, and prepares to rob the Gospel of its strength. These things and others that class of men who are known as pan-Christians continually repeat and amplify; and these men, so far from being quite few and scattered, have increased to the dimensions of an entire class, and have grouped themselves into widely spread societies, most of which are directed by non-Catholics, although they are imbued with varying doctrines concerning the things of faith. This undertaking is so actively promoted as in many places to win for itself the adhesion of a number of citizens, and it even takes possession of the minds of very many Catholics and allures them with the hope of bringing about such a union as would be agreeable to the desires of Holy Mother Church, who has indeed nothing more at heart than to recall her erring sons and to lead them back to her bosom. But in reality beneath these enticing words and blandishments lies hid a most grave error, by which the foundations of the Catholic faith are completely destroyed.

5. Admonished, therefore, by the consciousness of Our Apostolic office that We should not permit the flock of the Lord to be cheated by dangerous fallacies, We invoke, Venerable Brethren, your zeal in avoiding this evil; for We are confident that by the writings and words of each one of you the people will more easily get to know and understand those principles and arguments which We are about to set forth, and from which Catholics will learn how they are to think and act when there is question of those undertakings which have for their end the union in one body, whatsoever be the manner, of all who call themselves Christians(Pope Pius XI, Mortalium Animos, January 6, 1928.)

Do the lords of conciliarism think with the mind of Holy Mother Church or with the mind of Antichrist?

As they contradict the consistent teaching of the Catholic Church that was merely reiterated by Pope Pius XI in Mortalium Animos, obviosuly, they show themselves to be apostates whose heretical beliefs, words and actions place themselves outside the pale of her maternal bosom.Another step in the direction of the One World Ecumenical Church was taken in 1989 when “Saint John Paul II’ and Dr. Robert Runcie met for the second time, albeit as equals in the Basilica of Saint Peter itself:

After worshipping together in the Basilica of Saint Peter and in the Church of Saint Gregory, from where Saint Augustine of Canterbury was sent by Saint Gregory the Great to England, Pope John Paul II, Bishop of Rome, and His Grace Robert Runcie, Archbishop of Canterbury, now meet again to pray together in order to give fresh impetus to the reconciling mission of God’s people in a divided and broken world, and to review the obstacles which still impede closer communion between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion.

Our joint pilgrimage to the Church of Saint Gregory, with its historic association with Saint Augustine’s mission to baptize England, reminds us that the purpose of the Church is nothing other than the evangelization of all peoples, nations and cultures. We give thanks together for the readiness and openness to receive the Gospel that is especially evident in the developing world, where young Christian communities joyfully embrace the faith of Jesus Christ and vigorously express a costly witness to the Gospel of the Kingdom in sacrificial living. The word of God is received, “not as the word of man, but as what it really is, the word of God” (1Thess. 2, 13). As we enter the last decade of the second millennium of the birth of Jesus Christ, we pray together for a new evangelization throughout the world, not least in the continent of Saint Gregory and Saint Augustine where the progressive secularization of society erodes the language of faith and where materialism demeans the spiritual nature of humankind.

It is in such a perspective that the urgent quest for Christian unity must be viewed, for the Lord Jesus Christ prayed for the unity of his disciples “so that the world may believe” (Io. 17, 21). Moreover Christian disunity has itself contributed to the tragedy of human division throughout the world. We pray for peace and justice, especially where religious differences are exploited for the increase of strife between communities of faith.

Against the background of human disunity the arduous journey to Christian unity must be pursued with determination and vigour, whatever obstacles are perceived to block the path. We here solemnly re-commit ourselves and those we represent to the restoration of visible unity and full ecclesial communion in the confidence that to seek anything less would be to betray our Lord’s intention for the unity of his people.

This is by no means to be unrealistic about the difficulties facing our dialogue at the present time. When we established the Second Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission in Canterbury in 1982, we were well aware that the Commission’s task would be far from easy. The convergences achieved within the report of the First Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission have happily now been accepted by the Lambeth Conference of the bishops of the Anglican Communion. This report is currently also being studied by the Catholic Church with a view to responding to it. On the other hand, the question and practice of the admission of women to the ministerial priesthood in some Provinces of the Anglican Communion prevents reconciliation between us even where there is otherwise progress towards agreement in faith on the meaning of the Eucharist and the ordained ministry. These differences in faith reflect important ecclesiological differences and we urge the members of the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission and all others engaged in prayer and work for visible unity not to minimize these differences. At the same time we also urge them not to abandon either their hope or work for unity. At the beginning of the dialogue established here in Rome in 1966 by our beloved predecessors Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey, no one saw clearly how long-inherited divisions would be overcome and how unity in faith might be achieved. No pilgrim knows in advance all the steps along the path. Saint Augustine of Canterbury set out from Rome with his band of monks for what was then a distant corner of the world. Yet Pope Gregory was soon to write of the baptism of the English and of “such great miracles… that they seemed to imitate the powers of the apostles” (S. Gregorii Magni Epistula ad Eulogium Alexandrinum). While we ourselves do not see a solution to this obstacle, we are confident that through our engagement with this matter our conversations will in fact help to deepen and enlarge our understanding. We have this confidence because Christ promised that the Holy Spirit, who is the Spirit of Truth, will remain with us forever (Cfr. Io. 14, 16-17).

We also urge our clergy and faithful not to neglect or undervalue that certain yet imperfect communion we already share. This communion already shared is grounded in faith in God our Father, in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit, our common baptism into Christ, our sharing of the Holy Scriptures, of the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds; the Chalcedonian definition and the teaching of the Fathers; our common Christian inheritance for many centuries. This communion should be cherished and guarded as we seek to grow into the fuller communion Christ wills. Even in the years of our separation we have been able to recognize gifts of the Spirit in each other. The ecumenical journey is not only about the removal of obstacles but also about the sharing of gifts.

As we meet together today we have also in our hearts those other Churches and Ecclesial Communities with whom we are in dialogue. As we have said once before in Canterbury, our aim extends to the fulfilment of God’s will for the visible unity of all his people.

Nor is God’s will for unity limited exclusively to Christians alone. Christian unity is demanded so that the Church can be a more effective sign of God’s Kingdom of love and justice for all humanity. In fact, the Church is the sign and sacrament of the communion in Christ which God wills for the whole of his creation.

Such a vision elicits hope and patient determination, not despair or cynicism. And because such hope is a gift of the Holy Spirit we shall not be disappointed; for “the power at work within us is able to do far more abundantly than all we ask or think. To him be glory in the Church and in Christ Jesus to all generations, for ever and ever. Amen” (Common Declaration of John PauI II and Robert Runcie, October 2, 1989.)

The 1989 “joint declaration” embraced the “new evangelization” as it welcomed non-Christian sects to work for the “good of humanity.” This Judeo-Masonic exhortation was given after an exercise in joint prayer, something that Pope Pius XI noted in Mortalium Animos has always been forbidden by the Catholic Church:

8. This being so, it is clear that the Apostolic See cannot on any terms take part in their assemblies, nor is it anyway lawful for Catholics either to support or to work for such enterprises; for if they do so they will be giving countenance to a false Christianity, quite alien to the one Church of Christ. Shall We suffer, what would indeed be iniquitous, the truth, and a truth divinely revealed, to be made a subject for compromise? For here there is question of defending revealed truth. Jesus Christ sent His Apostles into the whole world in order that they might permeate all nations with the Gospel faith, and, lest they should err, He willed beforehand that they should be taught by the Holy Ghost:[15] has then this doctrine of the Apostles completely vanished away, or sometimes been obscured, in the Church, whose ruler and defense is God Himself? If our Redeemer plainly said that His Gospel was to continue not only during the times of the Apostles, but also till future ages, is it possible that the object of faith should in the process of time become so obscure and uncertain, that it would be necessary to-day to tolerate opinions which are even incompatible one with another? If this were true, we should have to confess that the coming of the Holy Ghost on the Apostles, and the perpetual indwelling of the same Spirit in the Church, and the very preaching of Jesus Christ, have several centuries ago, lost all their efficacy and use, to affirm which would be blasphemy. But the Only-begotten Son of God, when He commanded His representatives to teach all nations, obliged all men to give credence to whatever was made known to them by “witnesses preordained by God,”[16] and also confirmed His command with this sanction: “He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved; but he that believeth not shall be condemned.”[17] These two commands of Christ, which must be fulfilled, the one, namely, to teach, and the other to believe, cannot even be understood, unless the Church proposes a complete and easily understood teaching, and is immune when it thus teaches from all danger of erring. In this matter, those also turn aside from the right path, who think that the deposit of truth such laborious trouble, and with such lengthy study and discussion, that a man’s life would hardly suffice to find and take possession of it; as if the most merciful God had spoken through the prophets and His Only-begotten Son merely in order that a few, and those stricken in years, should learn what He had revealed through them, and not that He might inculcate a doctrine of faith and morals, by which man should be guided through the whole course of his moral life.

9. These pan-Christians who turn their minds to uniting the churches seem, indeed, to pursue the noblest of ideas in promoting charity among all Christians: nevertheless how does it happen that this charity tends to injure faith? Everyone knows that John himself, the Apostle of love, who seems to reveal in his Gospel the secrets of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and who never ceased to impress on the memories of his followers the new commandment “Love one another,” altogether forbade any intercourse with those who professed a mutilated and corrupt version of Christ’s teaching: “If any man come to you and bring not this doctrine, receive him not into the house nor say to him: God speed you.”[18] For which reason, since charity is based on a complete and sincere faith, the disciples of Christ must be united principally by the bond of one faith. Who then can conceive a Christian Federation, the members of which retain each his own opinions and private judgment, even in matters which concern the object of faith, even though they be repugnant to the opinions of the rest? And in what manner, We ask, can men who follow contrary opinions, belong to one and the same Federation of the faithful? For example, those who affirm, and those who deny that sacred Tradition is a true fount of divine Revelation; those who hold that an ecclesiastical hierarchy, made up of bishops, priests and ministers, has been divinely constituted, and those who assert that it has been brought in little by little in accordance with the conditions of the time; those who adore Christ really present in the Most Holy Eucharist through that marvelous conversion of the bread and wine, which is called transubstantiation, and those who affirm that Christ is present only by faith or by the signification and virtue of the Sacrament; those who in the Eucharist recognize the nature both of a sacrament and of a sacrifice, and those who say that it is nothing more than the memorial or commemoration of the Lord’s Supper; those who believe it to be good and useful to invoke by prayer the Saints reigning with Christ, especially Mary the Mother of God, and to venerate their images, and those who urge that such a veneration is not to be made use of, for it is contrary to the honor due to Jesus Christ, “the one mediator of God and men.”[19] How so great a variety of opinions can make the way clear to effect the unity of the Church We know not; that unity can only arise from one teaching authority, one law of belief and one faith of Christians. But We do know that from this it is an easy step to the neglect of religion or indifferentism and to modernism, as they call it. Those, who are unhappily infected with these errors, hold that dogmatic truth is not absolute but relative, that is, it agrees with the varying necessities of time and place and with the varying tendencies of the mind, since it is not contained in immutable revelation, but is capable of being accommodated to human life. Besides this, in connection with things which must be believed, it is nowise licit to use that distinction which some have seen fit to introduce between those articles of faith which are fundamental and those which are not fundamental, as they say, as if the former are to be accepted by all, while the latter may be left to the free assent of the faithful: for the supernatural virtue of faith has a formal cause, namely the authority of God revealing, and this is patient of no such distinction. For this reason it is that all who are truly Christ’s believe, for example, the Conception of the Mother of God without stain of original sin with the same faith as they believe the mystery of the August Trinity, and the Incarnation of our Lord just as they do the infallible teaching authority of the Roman Pontiff, according to the sense in which it was defined by the Ecumenical Council of the Vatican. Are these truths not equally certain, or not equally to be believed, because the Church has solemnly sanctioned and defined them, some in one age and some in another, even in those times immediately before our own? Has not God revealed them all? For the teaching authority of the Church, which in the divine wisdom was constituted on earth in order that revealed doctrines might remain intact for ever, and that they might be brought with ease and security to the knowledge of men, and which is daily exercised through the Roman Pontiff and the Bishops who are in communion with him, has also the office of defining, when it sees fit, any truth with solemn rites and decrees, whenever this is necessary either to oppose the errors or the attacks of heretics, or more clearly and in greater detail to stamp the minds of the faithful with the articles of sacred doctrine which have been explained. But in the use of this extraordinary teaching authority no newly invented matter is brought in, nor is anything new added to the number of those truths which are at least implicitly contained in the deposit of Revelation, divinely handed down to the Church: only those which are made clear which perhaps may still seem obscure to some, or that which some have previously called into question is declared to be of faith.

10. So, Venerable Brethren, it is clear why this Apostolic See has never allowed its subjects to take part in the assemblies of non-Catholics: for the union of Christians can only be promoted by promoting the return to the one true Church of Christ of those who are separated from it, for in the past they have unhappily left it. To the one true Church of Christ, we say, which is visible to all, and which is to remain, according to the will of its Author, exactly the same as He instituted it. During the lapse of centuries, the mystical Spouse of Christ has never been contaminated, nor can she ever in the future be contaminated, as Cyprian bears witness: “The Bride of Christ cannot be made false to her Spouse: she is incorrupt and modest. She knows but one dwelling, she guards the sanctity of the nuptial chamber chastely and modestly.“[20] The same holy Martyr with good reason marveled exceedingly that anyone could believe that “this unity in the Church which arises from a divine foundation, and which is knit together by heavenly sacraments, could be rent and torn asunder by the force of contrary wills.”[21] For since the mystical body of Christ, in the same manner as His physical body, is one,[22] compacted and fitly joined together,[23] it were foolish and out of place to say that the mystical body is made up of members which are disunited and scattered abroad: whosoever therefore is not united with the body is no member of it, neither is he in communion with Christ its head.[24] (Pope Pius XI, Mortalium Animos, January 6, 1928.)

It is not sedevacantism that is “evil.” It is conciliarism, which is the work of Antichrist and as such can never be associated in any way with the spotless, virginal Mystical Bride of Christ the King, He Who is her Divine Founder, Invisible Head and Mystical Bridegroom. As Pope Pius XI reminded us in Moralium Animos as he quoted Saint Cyprian, “During the lapse of centuries, the mystical Spouse of Christ has never been contaminated, nor can she ever in the future be contaminated, as Cyprian bears witness: ‘The Bride of Christ cannot be made false to her Spouse: she is incorrupt and modest. She knows but one dwelling, she guards the sanctity of the nuptial chamber chastely and modestly.'”

Such is not the counterfeit church of conciliarism.

The final two “joint declaration, ” appended below, make clear the need for an acceptance of the “church as communion” as the “Ut unum sint” mantra is repeated as a kind of Hindu or Buddhist chant to make everything all right with the true God of Divine Revelation, Christ the King.

Through it all, we have seen false “popes” and false Anglican “archbishops” attempt to give “joint blessings.” We have seen conciliar “popes” enter into Canterbury Cathedral and have seen conciliar “bishops” aplenty enter into all manner of Protestant church buildings as they have invited Protestant clergymen to speak even during the context of the Protestant and Judeo-Masonic Novus Ordo liturgical service.

The English and Irish Martyrs died for this?

No.

Blessed Edmund Campion, S.J., who was himself a convert to Catholicism from Anglicanism in Elizabethan England before suffering martyrdom at the direct command of wretched old Queen Bess herself, wrote the following about the courage of Catholics who refused to give any credence whatsoever to Anglican ownership of Catholic churches:

“When a priest comes to the houses of the Catholic gentry, they first salute him as a stranger unknown to them, and then they take him into an inner chamber where an oratory is set up, where all fall on their knees and ask his blessing. Then they ask how long he will remain with them, and pray him to stop as long as he may. If he says he must go on the morrow, as he usually does–for it is dangerous to remain longer–they all prepare for confession that evening; the next morning they hear Mass and receive Holy Communion; then after preaching and giving his blessing a second time, the priest departs and is conducted on his journey by one of the young gentlemen.

“No one in these parts is to be found who complains of the length of the services; if a Mass does not last nearly an hour, many are discontented. If six, eight or more Masses are said in the same place, and on the same day (as often happens when there is a meeting of priests), the same congregation will assist. When they can get priests, they confess every week . . . A lady was lately told that she should be let out of prison if she would just once allow herself to be seen walking through an Anglican church. She refused. She had come into prison with a sound conscience and would depart with it, or die. In Henry’s day [King Henry VIII], the whole kingdom, with all its bishops and learned men, abjured its faith at one word of the tyrant. Be now, in his daughter’s days [the daughter was Queen Elizabeth], boys and women boldly profess their faith before the judges and refuse to make the slightest concession even at the threat of death.

“The adversaries are very mad that by no cruelty can they move a single Catholic from his resolution, no, not even a little girl. A young lady of sixteen was questioned by the sham bishop of London about the Pope, and answered him with courage, and even made fun of him in public, and so was ordered to be carried to the public prison . . . One the way she cried out that she was being carried to that place for her religion.” (Father Harold C. Gardiner, S.J., Edmund Campion, Hero of God’s Underground, Vision Books: Farrar, Straus and Cudahy, 1957.)

The English and Irish Martyrs have been defamed by apostates who blaspheme God at every turn by believing, speaking and acting in ways contrary to His Sacred Deposit of Faith. No Catholic can have anything to do with such men who believe, speak and act in such ways.

We entrust all to Christ the King through the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of Mary, praying as many Rosaries each day as our state-in-life permits.

Isn’t it time to pray a Rosary now?

Vivat Christus Rex! Viva Cristo Rey!

Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us now and at the hour of our death.

Saint Joseph, pray for us.

Saints Peter and Paul, pray for us.

Saint John the Baptist, pray for us.

Saint John the Evangelist, pray for us.

Saint Michael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Gabriel the Archangel, pray for us.

Saint Raphael the Archangel, pray for us.

Saints Joachim and Anne, pray for us.

Saint Paulinus of Nola, pray for us.

Appendix

1996 and 2006 Joint Anglican-Conciliar Declarations:

Once again in the city of Rome an Archbishop of Canterbury, His Grace George Carey representing the Anglican Communion, and the Bishop of Rome, His Holiness Pope John Paul II have met together and joined in prayer.

Conscious that the second Christian millennium, now in its closing years, has seen division, even open hostility and strife between Christians, our fervent prayer has been for the grace of reconciliation. We have prayed earnestly for conversion – conversion to Christ and to one another in Christ. We have asked that Catholics and Anglicans may be granted the wisdom to know, and the strength to carry out, the Father’s will. This will enable progress towards that full visible unity which is God’s gift and our calling.

We have given thanks that in many parts of the world Anglicans and Catholics, joined in one baptism, recognise one another as brothers and sisters in Christ and give expression to this through joint prayer, common action and joint witness. This is a testimony to the communion we know we already share by God’s mercy and demonstrates our intention that it should come to the fullness willed by Christ. We have given particular thanks for the spirit of faith in God’s promises, persevering hope and mutual love which has inspired all who have worked for unity between the Anglican Communion and the Catholic Church since our predecessors Archbishop Michael Ramsey and Pope Paul VI met and prayed together. In the Church of Saint Gregory on the Celian Hill, we have remembered with gratitude the common heritage of Anglicans and Catholics rooted in the mission to the English people which Pope Gregory the Great entrusted to Saint Augustine of Canterbury.

For over twenty-five years a steady and painstaking international theological dialogue has been undertaken by the Anglican-Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC). We affirm the signs of progress provided in the statements of ARCIC I on the Eucharist and on the understanding of ministry and ordination, which have received an authoritative response from both partners of the dialogue. ARCIC II has produced further statements on salvation and the Church, the understanding of the Church as communion, and on the kind of life and fidelity to Christ we seek to share. These statements deserve to be more widely known. They require analysis, reflection and response. At present the International Commission is seeking to further the convergence on authority in the Church. Without agreement in this area we shall not reach the full visible unity to which we are both committed. The obstacle to reconciliation caused by the ordination of women as priests and bishops in some provinces of the Anglican Communion has also become increasingly evident, creating a new situation. In view of this, it may be opportune at this stage in our journey to consult further about how the relationship between the Anglican Communion and the Catholic Church is to progress. At the same time, we encourage ARCIC to continue and deepen our theological dialogue, not only over issues connected with our present difficulties but also in all areas where full agreement has still to be reached.

We are called to preach the Gospel, urging it “in season and out of season” (2 Tim 4:2). In many parts of the world Anglicans and Catholics attempt to witness together in the face of growing secularism, religious apathy and moral confusion. Whenever they are able to give united witness to the Gospel they must do so, for our divisions obscure the Gospel message of reconciliation and hope. We urge our people to make full use of the possibilities already available to them, for example in the Catholic Church’s Directory for the Application of Principles and Norms on Ecumenism (1993). We call on them to repent of the past, to pray for the grace of unity and to open themselves to God’s transforming power, and to cooperate in all appropriate ways at local, national and provincial levels. We pray that the spirit of dialogue may prevail which will contribute to reconciliation and prevent new difficulties from emerging. Whenever actions take place which show signs of an attitude of proselytism they prevent our common witness and must be eliminated.

We look forward to the celebration of 2000 years since the Word become flesh and dwelt among us (cf. Jn 1:14). This is an opportunity to proclaim afresh our common faith in God who loved the world so much that he sent his Son, not to condemn the world but so that the world might be saved through him (cf. Jn 3:16-17). We encourage Anglicans and Catholics, with all their Christian brothers and sisters, to pray, celebrate and witness together in the year 2000. We make this call in a spirit of humility, recognising that credible witness will only be fully given when Anglicans and Catholics, with all their Christian brothers and sisters, have achieved that full, visible unity that corresponds to Christ’s prayer “that they may all be one É so that the world may believe” (Jn 17:21).(Common Declaration of Pope John Paul II and George Carey, December 5, 1996.)

Forty years ago, our predecessors, Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey, met together in this city sanctified by the ministry and the blood of the Apostles Peter and Paul. They began a new journey of reconciliation based on the Gospels and the ancient common traditions. Centuries of estrangement between Anglicans and Catholics were replaced by a new desire for partnership and co-operation, as the real but incomplete communion we share was rediscovered and affirmed.  Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Ramsey undertook at that time to establish a dialogue in which matters which had been divisive in the past might be addressed from a fresh perspective with truth and love.

Since that meeting, the Roman Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion have entered into a process of fruitful dialogue, which has been marked by the discovery of significant elements of shared faith and a desire to give expression, through joint prayer, witness and service, to that which we hold in common. Over thirty-five years, the Anglican – Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC) has produced a number of important documents which seek to articulate the faith we share.  In the ten years since the most recent Common Declaration was signed by the Pope and the Archbishop of Canterbury, the second phase of ARCIC has completed its mandate, with the publication of the documents The Gift of Authority (1999) and Mary: Grace and Hope in Christ (2005).  We are grateful to the theologians who have prayed and worked together in the preparation of these texts, which await further study and reflection.

True ecumenism goes beyond theological dialogue; it touches our spiritual lives and our common witness. As our dialogue has developed, many Catholics and Anglicans have found in each other a love for Christ which invites us into practical co-operation and service. This fellowship in the service of Christ, experienced by many of our communities around the world, adds a further impetus to our relationship. The International Anglican – Roman Catholic Commission for Unity and Mission (IARCCUM) has been engaged in an exploration of the appropriate ways in which our shared mission to proclaim new life in Christ to the world can be advanced and nurtured. Their report, which sets out both a summary of the central conclusions of ARCIC and makes proposals for growing together in mission and witness, has recently been completed and submitted for review to the Anglican Communion Office and the Pontifical Council for Promoting Christian Unity, and we express our gratitude for their work.

In this fraternal visit, we celebrate the good which has come from these four decades of dialogue. We are grateful to God for the gifts of grace which have accompanied them. At the same time, our long journey together makes it necessary to acknowledge publicly the challenge represented by new developments which, besides being divisive for Anglicans, present serious obstacles to our ecumenical progress. It is a matter of urgency, therefore, that in renewing our commitment to pursue the path towards full visible communion in the truth and love of Christ, we also commit ourselves in our continuing dialogue to address the important issues involved in the emerging ecclesiological and ethical factors making that journey more difficult and arduous.

As Christian leaders facing the challenges of the new millennium, we affirm again our public commitment to the revelation of divine life uniquely set forth by God in the divinity and humanity of Our Lord Jesus Christ. We believe that it is through Christ and the means of salvation found in him that healing and reconciliation are offered to us and to the world.

There are many areas of witness and service in which we can stand together, and which indeed call for closer co-operation between us:  the pursuit of peace in the Holy Land and in other parts of the world marred by conflict and the threat of terrorism; promoting respect for life from conception until natural death; protecting the sanctity of marriage and the well-being of children in the context of healthy family life; outreach to the poor, oppressed and the most vulnerable, especially those who are persecuted for their faith; addressing the negative effects of materialism; and care for creation and for our environment. We also commit ourselves to inter-religious dialogue through which we can jointly reach out to our non-Christian brothers and sisters.

Mindful of our forty years of dialogue, and of the witness of the holy men and women common to our traditions, including Mary the Theotókos, Saints Peter and Paul, Benedict, Gregory the Great, and Augustine of Canterbury, we pledge ourselves to more fervent prayer and a more dedicated endeavour to welcome and live by that truth into which the Spirit of the Lord wishes to lead his disciples (cf. Jn 16:13).  Confident of the apostolic hope “that he who has begun this good work in you will bring it to completion”(cf. Phil 1:6), we believe that if we can together be God’s instruments in calling all Christians to a deeper obedience to our Lord, we will also draw closer to each other, finding in his will the fullness of unity and common life to which he invites us. (Ratzinger and Williams, November 23, 2006.)

Eph. 3, 20-21).   (Common Declaration of Pope John Paul II and His Grace Robert Runcie, October 2, 1989.)October 2, 1989

After worshipping together in the Basilica of Saint Peter and in the Church of Saint Gregory, from where Saint Augustine of Canterbury was sent by Saint Gregory the Great to England, Pope John Paul II, Bishop of Rome, and His Grace Robert Runcie, Archbishop of Canterbury, now meet again to pray together in order to give fresh impetus to the reconciling mission of God’s people in a divided and broken world, and to review the obstacles which still impede closer communion between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion.

Our joint pilgrimage to the Church of Saint Gregory, with its historic association with Saint Augustine’s mission to baptize England, reminds us that the purpose of the Church is nothing other than the evangelization of all peoples, nations and cultures, We give thanks together for the readiness and openness to receive the Gospel that is especially evident in the developing world, where young Christian communities joyfully embrace the faith of Jesus Christ and vigorously express a costly witness to the Gospel of the Kingdom in sacrificial living. The word of God is received, “not as the word of man, but as what it really is, the word of God” (1 Thess 2:13). As we enter the last decade of the second millennium of the birth of Jesus Christ, we pray together for a new evangelization throughout the world, not least in the continent of Saint Gregory and Saint Augustine where the progressive secularization of society erodes the language of faith and where materialism demeans the spiritual nature of humankind.

It is in such a perspective that the urgent quest for Christian unity must be viewed, for the Lord Jesus Christ prayed for the unity of his disciples “so that the world may believe” (Jn 17:21). Moreover Christian disunity has itself contributed to the tragedy of human division throughout the world. We pray for peace and justice, especially where religious differences are exploited for the increase of strife between communities of faith.

Against the background of human disunity the arduous journey to Christian unity must be pursued with determination and vigour, whatever obstacles are perceived to block the path. We here solemnly re–commit ourselves and those we represent to the restoration of visible unity and full ecclesial communion in the confidence that to seek anything less would be to betray our Lord’s intention for the unity of his people.

This is by no means to be unrealistic about the difficulties facing our dialogue at the present time. When we established the Second Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission in Canterbury in 1982, w were well aware that the Commission’s task would be far from easy. The convergences achieved within the report of the First Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission have happily now been accepted by the Lambeth Conference of the bishops of the Anglican Communion. This report is currently also being studied by the Catholic Church with a view to responding to it. On the other hand, the question and practice of the admission of women to the ministerial priesthood in some Provinces of the Anglican Communion prevents reconciliation between us even where there is otherwise progress towards agreement in faith on the meaning of the Eucharist and the ordained ministry. These differences in faith reflect important ecclesiological differences and we urge the members of the Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission and all others engaged in prayer and work for visible unity not to minimize these differences. At the same time we also urge them not to abandon either their hope or work for unity. At the beginning of the dialogue established here in Rome in 1966 for our bellowed predecessors Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey, no one saw clearly how long–inherited divisions would be overcome and how unity in faith might be achieved. No pilgrim knows in advance all the steps along the path. Saint Augustine of Canterbury set out from Rome with his band of monks for what was then a distant corner of the world. Yet Pope Gregory was soon to write of the baptism of the English and of “such great miracles … that they seemed to imitate the powers of the apostles” (Letter of Gregory the Great to Eulogius of Alexandria). While we ourselves do not see a solution to this obstacle, we are confident that through our engagement with this matter our conversations will in fact help to deepen and enlarge our understanding. We have this confidence because Christ promised that the Holy Spirit, who is the Spirit of Truth, will remain with us forever (cf. Jn 14:16–17).

We also urge our clergy and faithful not to neglect or undervalue that certain yet imperfect communion we already share. This communion already shared is grounded in faith in God our Father, in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit; our common baptism into Christ; our sharing of the Holy Scriptures, of the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds; the Chalcedonian definition and the teaching of the Fathers; our common Christian inheritance for many centuries. This communion should be cherished and guarded as we seek to grow into the fuller communion Christ wills. Even in the years of our separation we have been able to recognize gifts of the Spirit in each other. The ecumenical journey is not only about the removal of obstacles but also about the sharing of gifts.

As we meet together today we have also in our hearts those other Churches and Ecclesial Communities with whom we are in dialogue As we have said once before in Canterbury, our aim extends to the fulfilment of God’s will for the visible unity of all his people.

Nor is God’s will for unity limited exclusively to Christians alone. Christian unity is demanded so that the Church can be a more effective sign of God’s Kingdom of love and justice for all humanity. In fact, the Church is the sign and sacrament of the communion in Christ which God wills for the whole of his creation.

Such a vision elicits hope and patient determination, not despair or cynicism. And because such hope is a gift of the Holy Spirit we shall not be disappointed; for “the power at work within us is able to do far more abundantly than all we ask or think. To him be glory in the Church and in Christ Jesus to all generations, for ever and ever. Amen” (Eph 3:20–21).

ROBERT CANTUAR
JOHN PAUL II

– See more at: http://www.anglicancommunion.org/ministry/ecumenical/dialogues/catholic/declarations/docs/common_declaration_1989.cfm#sthash.YcS7ODaI.dpuf

October 2, 1989

After worshipping together in the Basilica of Saint Peter and in the Church of Saint Gregory, from where Saint Augustine of Canterbury was sent by Saint Gregory the Great to England, Pope John Paul II, Bishop of Rome, and His Grace Robert Runcie, Archbishop of Canterbury, now meet again to pray together in order to give fresh impetus to the reconciling mission of God’s people in a divided and broken world, and to review the obstacles which still impede closer communion between the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion.

Our joint pilgrimage to the Church of Saint Gregory, with its historic association with Saint Augustine’s mission to baptize England, reminds us that the purpose of the Church is nothing other than the evangelization of all peoples, nations and cultures, We give thanks together for the readiness and openness to receive the Gospel that is especially evident in the developing world, where young Christian communities joyfully embrace the faith of Jesus Christ and vigorously express a costly witness to the Gospel of the Kingdom in sacrificial living. The word of God is received, “not as the word of man, but as what it really is, the word of God” (1 Thess 2:13). As we enter the last decade of the second millennium of the birth of Jesus Christ, we pray together for a new evangelization throughout the world, not least in the continent of Saint Gregory and Saint Augustine where the progressive secularization of society erodes the language of faith and where materialism demeans the spiritual nature of humankind.

It is in such a perspective that the urgent quest for Christian unity must be viewed, for the Lord Jesus Christ prayed for the unity of his disciples “so that the world may believe” (Jn 17:21). Moreover Christian disunity has itself contributed to the tragedy of human division throughout the world. We pray for peace and justice, especially where religious differences are exploited for the increase of strife between communities of faith.

Against the background of human disunity the arduous journey to Christian unity must be pursued with determination and vigour, whatever obstacles are perceived to block the path. We here solemnly re–commit ourselves and those we represent to the restoration of visible unity and full ecclesial communion in the confidence that to seek anything less would be to betray our Lord’s intention for the unity of his people.

This is by no means to be unrealistic about the difficulties facing our dialogue at the present time. When we established the Second Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission in Canterbury in 1982, w were well aware that the Commission’s task would be far from easy. The convergences achieved within the report of the First Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission have happily now been accepted by the Lambeth Conference of the bishops of the Anglican Communion. This report is currently also being studied by the Catholic Church with a view to responding to it. On the other hand, the question and practice of the admission of women to the ministerial priesthood in some Provinces of the Anglican Communion prevents reconciliation between us even where there is otherwise progress towards agreement in faith on the meaning of the Eucharist and the ordained ministry. These differences in faith reflect important ecclesiological differences and we urge the members of the Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission and all others engaged in prayer and work for visible unity not to minimize these differences. At the same time we also urge them not to abandon either their hope or work for unity. At the beginning of the dialogue established here in Rome in 1966 for our bellowed predecessors Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey, no one saw clearly how long–inherited divisions would be overcome and how unity in faith might be achieved. No pilgrim knows in advance all the steps along the path. Saint Augustine of Canterbury set out from Rome with his band of monks for what was then a distant corner of the world. Yet Pope Gregory was soon to write of the baptism of the English and of “such great miracles … that they seemed to imitate the powers of the apostles” (Letter of Gregory the Great to Eulogius of Alexandria). While we ourselves do not see a solution to this obstacle, we are confident that through our engagement with this matter our conversations will in fact help to deepen and enlarge our understanding. We have this confidence because Christ promised that the Holy Spirit, who is the Spirit of Truth, will remain with us forever (cf. Jn 14:16–17).

We also urge our clergy and faithful not to neglect or undervalue that certain yet imperfect communion we already share. This communion already shared is grounded in faith in God our Father, in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit; our common baptism into Christ; our sharing of the Holy Scriptures, of the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds; the Chalcedonian definition and the teaching of the Fathers; our common Christian inheritance for many centuries. This communion should be cherished and guarded as we seek to grow into the fuller communion Christ wills. Even in the years of our separation we have been able to recognize gifts of the Spirit in each other. The ecumenical journey is not only about the removal of obstacles but also about the sharing of gifts.

As we meet together today we have also in our hearts those other Churches and Ecclesial Communities with whom we are in dialogue As we have said once before in Canterbury, our aim extends to the fulfilment of God’s will for the visible unity of all his people.

Nor is God’s will for unity limited exclusively to Christians alone. Christian unity is demanded so that the Church can be a more effective sign of God’s Kingdom of love and justice for all humanity. In fact, the Church is the sign and sacrament of the communion in Christ which God wills for the whole of his creation.

Such a vision elicits hope and patient determination, not despair or cynicism. And because such hope is a gift of the Holy Spirit we shall not be disappointed; for “the power at work within us is able to do far more abundantly than all we ask or think. To him be glory in the Church and in Christ Jesus to all generations, for ever and ever. Amen” (Eph 3:20–21).

ROBERT CANTUAR
JOHN PAUL II

– See more at: http://www.anglicancommunion.org/ministry/ecumenical/dialogues/catholic/declarations/docs/common_declaration_1989.cfm#sthash.YcS7ODaI.dpuf

Our joint pilgrimage to the Church of Saint Gregory, with its historic association with Saint Augustine’s mission to baptize England, reminds us that the purpose of the Church is nothing other than the evangelization of all peoples, nations and cultures, We give thanks together for the readiness and openness to receive the Gospel that is especially evident in the developing world, where young Christian communities joyfully embrace the faith of Jesus Christ and vigorously express a costly witness to the Gospel of the Kingdom in sacrificial living. The word of God is received, “not as the word of man, but as what it really is, the word of God” (1 Thess 2:13). As we enter the last decade of the second millennium of the birth of Jesus Christ, we pray together for a new evangelization throughout the world, not least in the continent of Saint Gregory and Saint Augustine where the progressive secularization of society erodes the language of faith and where materialism demeans the spiritual nature of humankind.

It is in such a perspective that the urgent quest for Christian unity must be viewed, for the Lord Jesus Christ prayed for the unity of his disciples “so that the world may believe” (Jn 17:21). Moreover Christian disunity has itself contributed to the tragedy of human division throughout the world. We pray for peace and justice, especially where religious differences are exploited for the increase of strife between communities of faith.

Against the background of human disunity the arduous journey to Christian unity must be pursued with determination and vigour, whatever obstacles are perceived to block the path. We here solemnly re–commit ourselves and those we represent to the restoration of visible unity and full ecclesial communion in the confidence that to seek anything less would be to betray our Lord’s intention for the unity of his people.

This is by no means to be unrealistic about the difficulties facing our dialogue at the present time. When we established the Second Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission in Canterbury in 1982, w were well aware that the Commission’s task would be far from easy. The convergences achieved within the report of the First Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission have happily now been accepted by the Lambeth Conference of the bishops of the Anglican Communion. This report is currently also being studied by the Catholic Church with a view to responding to it. On the other hand, the question and practice of the admission of women to the ministerial priesthood in some Provinces of the Anglican Communion prevents reconciliation between us even where there is otherwise progress towards agreement in faith on the meaning of the Eucharist and the ordained ministry. These differences in faith reflect important ecclesiological differences and we urge the members of the Anglican–Roman Catholic International Commission and all others engaged in prayer and work for visible unity not to minimize these differences. At the same time we also urge them not to abandon either their hope or work for unity. At the beginning of the dialogue established here in Rome in 1966 for our bellowed predecessors Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey, no one saw clearly how long–inherited divisions would be overcome and how unity in faith might be achieved. No pilgrim knows in advance all the steps along the path. Saint Augustine of Canterbury set out from Rome with his band of monks for what was then a distant corner of the world. Yet Pope Gregory was soon to write of the baptism of the English and of “such great miracles … that they seemed to imitate the powers of the apostles” (Letter of Gregory the Great to Eulogius of Alexandria). While we ourselves do not see a solution to this obstacle, we are confident that through our engagement with this matter our conversations will in fact help to deepen and enlarge our understanding. We have this confidence because Christ promised that the Holy Spirit, who is the Spirit of Truth, will remain with us forever (cf. Jn 14:16–17).

We also urge our clergy and faithful not to neglect or undervalue that certain yet imperfect communion we already share. This communion already shared is grounded in faith in God our Father, in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit; our common baptism into Christ; our sharing of the Holy Scriptures, of the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds; the Chalcedonian definition and the teaching of the Fathers; our common Christian inheritance for many centuries. This communion should be cherished and guarded as we seek to grow into the fuller communion Christ wills. Even in the years of our separation we have been able to recognize gifts of the Spirit in each other. The ecumenical journey is not only about the removal of obstacles but also about the sharing of gifts.

As we meet together today we have also in our hearts those other Churches and Ecclesial Communities with whom we are in dialogue As we have said once before in Canterbury, our aim extends to the fulfilment of God’s will for the visible unity of all his people.

Nor is God’s will for unity limited exclusively to Christians alone. Christian unity is demanded so that the Church can be a more effective sign of God’s Kingdom of love and justice for all humanity. In fact, the Church is the sign and sacrament of the communion in Christ which God wills for the whole of his creation.

Such a vision elicits hope and patient determination, not despair or cynicism. And because such hope is a gift of the Holy Spirit we shall not be disappointed; for “the power at work within us is able to do far more abundantly than all we ask or think. To him be glory in the Church and in Christ Jesus to all generations, for ever and ever. Amen” (Eph 3:20–21).

ROBERT CANTUAR
JOHN PAUL II

– See more at: http://www.anglicancommunion.org/ministry/ecumenical/dialogues/catholic/declarations/docs/common_declaration_1989.cfm#sthash.YcS7ODaI.dpuf

.

  1. After four hundred years of estrangement, it is now the third time in seventeen years that an Archbishop of Canterbury and the Pope embrace in Christian friendship in the city of Rome. Since the visit of Archbishop Ramsey eleven years have passed, and much has happened in that time to fulfil the hopes then expressed and to cause us to thank God.
  2. As the Roman Catholic Church and the constituent Churches of the Anglican Communion have sought to grow in mutual understanding and Christian love, they have come to recognize, to value and to give thanks for a common faith in God our Father, in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit; our common baptism into Christ; our sharing of the Holy Scriptures, of the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds, the Chalcedonian definition, and the teaching of the Fathers; our common Christian inheritance for many centuries with its living traditions of liturgy, theology, spirituality and mission.
  3. At the same time in fulfilment of the pledge of eleven years ago to ‘a serious dialogue which, founded on the Gospels and on the ancient common traditions, may lead to that unity in truth, for which Christ prayed’ (Common Declaration, 1966) Anglican and Roman Catholic theologians have faced calmly and objectively the historical and doctrinal differences which have divided us. Without compromising their respective allegiances, they have addressed these problems together, and in the process they have discovered theological convergences often as unexpected as they were happy.
  4. The Anglican – Roman Catholic International Commission has produced three documents: on the Eucharist, on Ministry and Ordination and on Church and Authority. We now recommend that the work it has begun be pursued, through the procedures appropriate to our respective Communions, so that both of them may be led along the path towards unity.

The moment will shortly come when the respective Authorities must evaluate the conclusions.

  1. The response of both Communions to the work and fruits of theological dialogue will be measured by the practical response of the faithful to the task of restoring unity, which as the Second Vatican Council says ‘involves the whole Church, faithful and clergy alike’ and ‘extends to everyone according to the talents of each’ (Unitatis Redintegratio, para. 5). We rejoice that this practical response has manifested itself in so many forms of pastoral cooperation in many parts of the world; in meetings of bishops, clergy and faithful.
  2. In mixed marriages between Anglicans and Roman Catholics, where the tragedy of our separation at the sacrament of union is seen most starkly, cooperation in pastoral care (Matrimonia Mixta, para. 14) in many places has borne fruit in increased understanding. Serious dialogue has cleared away many misconceptions and shown that we still share much that is deep-rooted in the Christian tradition and ideal of marriage, though important differences persist, particularly regarding remarriage after divorce. We are following attentively the work thus far accomplished in this dialogue by the Joint Commission on the Theology of Marriage and its Application to Mixed Marriages. It has stressed the need for fidelity and witness to the ideal of marriage, set forth in the New Testament and constantly taught in Christian tradition. We have a common duty to defend this tradition and ideal and the moral values which derive from it.
  3. All such cooperation, which must continue to grow and spread, is the true setting for continued dialogue and for the general extension and appreciation of its fruits, and so for progress towards that goal which is Christ’s will – the restoration of complete communion in faith and sacramental life.
  4. Our call to this is one with the sublime Christian vocation itself, which is a call to communion; as St. John says, ‘that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you may have fellowship with us; and our fellowship is with the Father and His Son Jesus Christ’ (1 John 1:3). If we are to maintain progress in doctrinal convergence and move forward resolutely to the communion of mind and heart for which Christ prayed we must ponder still further his intentions in founding the Church and face courageously their requirements.
  5. It is their communion with God in Christ through faith and through baptism and self-giving to Him that stands at the centre of our witness to the world, even while between us communion remains imperfect. Our divisions hinder this witness, hinder the work of Christ (Evangelii Nuntiandi, para. 77) but they do not close all roads we may travel together. In a spirit of prayer and of submission to God’s will we must collaborate more earnestly in a ‘greater common witness to Christ before the world in the very work of evangelization’ (Evangelii Nuntiandi, ibid.). It is our desire that the means of this collaboration be sought: the increasing spiritual hunger in all parts of God’s world invites us to such a common pilgrimage.

This collaboration, pursued to the limit allowed by truth and loyalty, will create the climate in which dialogue and doctrinal convergence can bear fruit. While this fruit is ripening, serious obstacles remain both of the past and of recent origin. Many in both communions are asking themselves whether they have a common faith sufficient to be translated into communion of life, worship and mission. Only the communions themselves through their pastoral authorities can give that answer. When the moment comes to do so, may the answer shine through in spirit and in truth, not obscured by the enmities, the prejudices and the suspicions of the past.

  1. To this we are bound to look forward and to spare no effort to bring it closer: to be baptized into Christ is to be baptized into hope – ‘and hope does not disappoint us because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit which has been given us’ (Rom 5:5).
  2. Christian hope manifests itself in prayer and action – in prudence but also in courage. We pledge ourselves and exhort the faithful of the Roman Catholic Church and of the Anglican Communion to live and work courageously in this hope of reconciliation and unity in our common Lord.

Donald Cantuar Paulus PP. VI

– See more at: http://www.anglicancommunion.org/ministry/ecumenical/dialogues/catholic/declarations/docs/common_declaration_1977.cfm#sthash.DjYsPIDl.dpuf

  1. After four hundred years of estrangement, it is now the third time in seventeen years that an Archbishop of Canterbury and the Pope embrace in Christian friendship in the city of Rome. Since the visit of Archbishop Ramsey eleven years have passed, and much has happened in that time to fulfil the hopes then expressed and to cause us to thank God.
  2. As the Roman Catholic Church and the constituent Churches of the Anglican Communion have sought to grow in mutual understanding and Christian love, they have come to recognize, to value and to give thanks for a common faith in God our Father, in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit; our common baptism into Christ; our sharing of the Holy Scriptures, of the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds, the Chalcedonian definition, and the teaching of the Fathers; our common Christian inheritance for many centuries with its living traditions of liturgy, theology, spirituality and mission.
  3. At the same time in fulfilment of the pledge of eleven years ago to ‘a serious dialogue which, founded on the Gospels and on the ancient common traditions, may lead to that unity in truth, for which Christ prayed’ (Common Declaration, 1966) Anglican and Roman Catholic theologians have faced calmly and objectively the historical and doctrinal differences which have divided us. Without compromising their respective allegiances, they have addressed these problems together, and in the process they have discovered theological convergences often as unexpected as they were happy.
  4. The Anglican – Roman Catholic International Commission has produced three documents: on the Eucharist, on Ministry and Ordination and on Church and Authority. We now recommend that the work it has begun be pursued, through the procedures appropriate to our respective Communions, so that both of them may be led along the path towards unity.

The moment will shortly come when the respective Authorities must evaluate the conclusions.

  1. The response of both Communions to the work and fruits of theological dialogue will be measured by the practical response of the faithful to the task of restoring unity, which as the Second Vatican Council says ‘involves the whole Church, faithful and clergy alike’ and ‘extends to everyone according to the talents of each’ (Unitatis Redintegratio, para. 5). We rejoice that this practical response has manifested itself in so many forms of pastoral cooperation in many parts of the world; in meetings of bishops, clergy and faithful.
  2. In mixed marriages between Anglicans and Roman Catholics, where the tragedy of our separation at the sacrament of union is seen most starkly, cooperation in pastoral care (Matrimonia Mixta, para. 14) in many places has borne fruit in increased understanding. Serious dialogue has cleared away many misconceptions and shown that we still share much that is deep-rooted in the Christian tradition and ideal of marriage, though important differences persist, particularly regarding remarriage after divorce. We are following attentively the work thus far accomplished in this dialogue by the Joint Commission on the Theology of Marriage and its Application to Mixed Marriages. It has stressed the need for fidelity and witness to the ideal of marriage, set forth in the New Testament and constantly taught in Christian tradition. We have a common duty to defend this tradition and ideal and the moral values which derive from it.
  3. All such cooperation, which must continue to grow and spread, is the true setting for continued dialogue and for the general extension and appreciation of its fruits, and so for progress towards that goal which is Christ’s will – the restoration of complete communion in faith and sacramental life.
  4. Our call to this is one with the sublime Christian vocation itself, which is a call to communion; as St. John says, ‘that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you may have fellowship with us; and our fellowship is with the Father and His Son Jesus Christ’ (1 John 1:3). If we are to maintain progress in doctrinal convergence and move forward resolutely to the communion of mind and heart for which Christ prayed we must ponder still further his intentions in founding the Church and face courageously their requirements.
  5. It is their communion with God in Christ through faith and through baptism and self-giving to Him that stands at the centre of our witness to the world, even while between us communion remains imperfect. Our divisions hinder this witness, hinder the work of Christ (Evangelii Nuntiandi, para. 77) but they do not close all roads we may travel together. In a spirit of prayer and of submission to God’s will we must collaborate more earnestly in a ‘greater common witness to Christ before the world in the very work of evangelization’ (Evangelii Nuntiandi, ibid.). It is our desire that the means of this collaboration be sought: the increasing spiritual hunger in all parts of God’s world invites us to such a common pilgrimage.

This collaboration, pursued to the limit allowed by truth and loyalty, will create the climate in which dialogue and doctrinal convergence can bear fruit. While this fruit is ripening, serious obstacles remain both of the past and of recent origin. Many in both communions are asking themselves whether they have a common faith sufficient to be translated into communion of life, worship and mission. Only the communions themselves through their pastoral authorities can give that answer. When the moment comes to do so, may the answer shine through in spirit and in truth, not obscured by the enmities, the prejudices and the suspicions of the past.

  1. To this we are bound to look forward and to spare no effort to bring it closer: to be baptized into Christ is to be baptized into hope – ‘and hope does not disappoint us because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit which has been given us’ (Rom 5:5).
  2. Christian hope manifests itself in prayer and action – in prudence but also in courage. We pledge ourselves and exhort the faithful of the Roman Catholic Church and of the Anglican Communion to live and work courageously in this hope of reconciliation and unity in our common Lord.

Donald Cantuar Paulus PP. VI

– See more at: http://www.anglicancommunion.org/ministry/ecumenical/dialogues/catholic/declarations/docs/common_declaration_1977.cfm#sthash.DjYsPIDl.dpuf

  1. After four hundred years of estrangement, it is now the third time in seventeen years that an Archbishop of Canterbury and the Pope embrace in Christian friendship in the city of Rome. Since the visit of Archbishop Ramsey eleven years have passed, and much has happened in that time to fulfil the hopes then expressed and to cause us to thank God.
  2. As the Roman Catholic Church and the constituent Churches of the Anglican Communion have sought to grow in mutual understanding and Christian love, they have come to recognize, to value and to give thanks for a common faith in God our Father, in our Lord Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Spirit; our common baptism into Christ; our sharing of the Holy Scriptures, of the Apostles’ and Nicene Creeds, the Chalcedonian definition, and the teaching of the Fathers; our common Christian inheritance for many centuries with its living traditions of liturgy, theology, spirituality and mission.
  3. At the same time in fulfilment of the pledge of eleven years ago to ‘a serious dialogue which, founded on the Gospels and on the ancient common traditions, may lead to that unity in truth, for which Christ prayed’ (Common Declaration, 1966) Anglican and Roman Catholic theologians have faced calmly and objectively the historical and doctrinal differences which have divided us. Without compromising their respective allegiances, they have addressed these problems together, and in the process they have discovered theological convergences often as unexpected as they were happy.
  4. The Anglican – Roman Catholic International Commission has produced three documents: on the Eucharist, on Ministry and Ordination and on Church and Authority. We now recommend that the work it has begun be pursued, through the procedures appropriate to our respective Communions, so that both of them may be led along the path towards unity.

The moment will shortly come when the respective Authorities must evaluate the conclusions.

  1. The response of both Communions to the work and fruits of theological dialogue will be measured by the practical response of the faithful to the task of restoring unity, which as the Second Vatican Council says ‘involves the whole Church, faithful and clergy alike’ and ‘extends to everyone according to the talents of each’ (Unitatis Redintegratio, para. 5). We rejoice that this practical response has manifested itself in so many forms of pastoral cooperation in many parts of the world; in meetings of bishops, clergy and faithful.
  2. In mixed marriages between Anglicans and Roman Catholics, where the tragedy of our separation at the sacrament of union is seen most starkly, cooperation in pastoral care (Matrimonia Mixta, para. 14) in many places has borne fruit in increased understanding. Serious dialogue has cleared away many misconceptions and shown that we still share much that is deep-rooted in the Christian tradition and ideal of marriage, though important differences persist, particularly regarding remarriage after divorce. We are following attentively the work thus far accomplished in this dialogue by the Joint Commission on the Theology of Marriage and its Application to Mixed Marriages. It has stressed the need for fidelity and witness to the ideal of marriage, set forth in the New Testament and constantly taught in Christian tradition. We have a common duty to defend this tradition and ideal and the moral values which derive from it.
  3. All such cooperation, which must continue to grow and spread, is the true setting for continued dialogue and for the general extension and appreciation of its fruits, and so for progress towards that goal which is Christ’s will – the restoration of complete communion in faith and sacramental life.
  4. Our call to this is one with the sublime Christian vocation itself, which is a call to communion; as St. John says, ‘that which we have seen and heard we proclaim also to you, so that you may have fellowship with us; and our fellowship is with the Father and His Son Jesus Christ’ (1 John 1:3). If we are to maintain progress in doctrinal convergence and move forward resolutely to the communion of mind and heart for which Christ prayed we must ponder still further his intentions in founding the Church and face courageously their requirements.
  5. It is their communion with God in Christ through faith and through baptism and self-giving to Him that stands at the centre of our witness to the world, even while between us communion remains imperfect. Our divisions hinder this witness, hinder the work of Christ (Evangelii Nuntiandi, para. 77) but they do not close all roads we may travel together. In a spirit of prayer and of submission to God’s will we must collaborate more earnestly in a ‘greater common witness to Christ before the world in the very work of evangelization’ (Evangelii Nuntiandi, ibid.). It is our desire that the means of this collaboration be sought: the increasing spiritual hunger in all parts of God’s world invites us to such a common pilgrimage.

This collaboration, pursued to the limit allowed by truth and loyalty, will create the climate in which dialogue and doctrinal convergence can bear fruit. While this fruit is ripening, serious obstacles remain both of the past and of recent origin. Many in both communions are asking themselves whether they have a common faith sufficient to be translated into communion of life, worship and mission. Only the communions themselves through their pastoral authorities can give that answer. When the moment comes to do so, may the answer shine through in spirit and in truth, not obscured by the enmities, the prejudices and the suspicions of the past.

  1. To this we are bound to look forward and to spare no effort to bring it closer: to be baptized into Christ is to be baptized into hope – ‘and hope does not disappoint us because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit which has been given us’ (Rom 5:5).
  2. Christian hope manifests itself in prayer and action – in prudence but also in courage. We pledge ourselves and exhort the faithful of the Roman Catholic Church and of the Anglican Communion to live and work courageously in this hope of reconciliation and unity in our common Lord.

Donald Cantuar Paulus PP. VI

– See more at: http://www.anglicancommunion.org/ministry/ecumenical/dialogues/catholic/declarations/docs/common_declaration_1977.cfm#sthash.DjYsPIDl.dpuf

June 21, 2014, Republished Reflection

June 21, 2014, Within the Octave of Corpus Christi and the Commemoration of Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, S.J.:

Although the Octave of Corpus Christi takes liturgical precedence in some places in the Catholic catacombs today, reducing the Feast of Saint Aloysius of Gonazaga to a commemoration, every June 21 should be a cause of great rejoicing for Catholics. Indeed, Saint Aloysius’s ardor for Our Lord in His Real Presence was such that his soul burned so  warmly after the reception of Holy Communion that he would have to throw himself into the fountain in a nearby piazza to cool off his ardor. How appropriate that is pearl of Catholic youth’s feast day, whether celebrated principally or commemorated, should fall within the Octave of Corpus Christi.

My own devotion to Saint Aloysius has been of longstanding. It was at Saint Aloysius School in Great Neck, New York, that I learned my Catholic Faith and it was at Saint Aloysius Church that I received my First Holy Communion and was Confirmed as a soldier in the Army of Christ the King. It is with great joy that I hereby republish my brief reflection on Saint Aloysius, Saint Aloysius, Help Us to be as Pure as Thee.

There will be a brief follow-up (well, it has a lengthy appendix to serve as reference source) to yesterday’s article Where the Absurd Is A Normal Way of Life posted later today or tomorrow.

Our Lady of the Rosary, pray for us.

Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, S.J., pray for us.

Saint Aloysius, Help Us To Be As Pure As Thee

Saint Aloysius Gonzaga is one of Holy Mother Church’s shining examples of a youth who maintained his innocence and purity throughout his twenty-three years of life as a member of the Church Militant on earth. I have had a particular devotion to this great lover of Our Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ in His Real Presence since 1956, the year I entered kindergarten at the school in the parish that had taken him for its patron in Great Neck, Long Island, New York. I owe Saint Aloysius Gonzaga so very much, for it was in the school that bore his name that I learned my Catholic Faith without any degree of compromise or dilution, It was in Saint Aloysius Church that I made my First Holy Communion on Saturday, May 30, 1959, and it was in that same church that the Most Reverend Walter P. Kellenberg, the founding Bishop of the Diocese of Rockville Centre, confirmed me as a soldier in the Army of Christ when I received the Sacrament of Confirmation on March 21, 1961. Oh, yes, I owe Saint Aloysius so very much.

Saint Aloysius Gonzaga was born in 1568. He received his own First Holy Communion from the hands of Saint Charles Borromeo, then a curial cardinal who was doing theological battle with the forces of the Protestant Revolt. Saint Aloysius had from the start a pure and burning love for Our Lord in His Real Presence in the Most Blessed Sacrament. Indeed, it is said that he had such burning fervor for Our Lord when receiving Holy Communion that his whole chest was aflame with a palpable, burning ardor. He was so aflame with ardor that he had to burst out of the doors of the church frequently after the reception of Holy Communion and throw himself into the fountain in the piazza in order to cool off his ardor.

A miserable, recidivist sinner such as yours truly cannot even imagine such ardor, the likes of which prompted a presbyter (although one with a very priestly bearing and countenance) on Long Island in 1986 to say in a sermon, “I am sure that this [Saint Aloysius’s burning ardor upon the reception of Holy Communion] is the very reason that many of you leave church immediately after receiving Holy Communion. You just have to throw yourself into your swimming pools.” Saint Aloysius thus teaches us first and foremost to recognize that our sins have damaged our immortal souls and that we need to recover some semblance of the purity of our own childhood in order to grow more fully in a pure and burning love for Our Lord that will result in greater intimacy with Him when we receive Holy Communion day after day. The Collect for Feast of Saint Aloysius in the Immemorial Mass of Tradition makes this very point:

“O God, among the gifts of heaven bestowed upon the angelic youth, Aloysius, you united a wondrous innocence to his exceptional spirit of penance. Although we have not followed his path of innocence, may we at least imitate his penance through his own merits and prayers.”

Saint Aloysius spent much time in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament, understanding that Eucharistic piety was a true foretaste of eternal glories. His time in prayer before the Blessed Sacrament prepared him to see in others the very image and likeness of the One He loved with such innocence and purity. It was this pure love of Our Lord that moved him to reject the courtly privileges of the Gonzaga family and to join the Society of Jesus when he was seventeen years of age. He excelled in his theological studies, excelling even more in his service to the poor and the the forgotten, especially the little waifs of the Trastevere district in Rome to whom he taught and explained the basics of the catechism. It was his desire to serve the Christ in the poor and the sick and the suffering that brought him to the bedside of a patient who was dying from the plague, thereby exposing himself to the disease that killed him in short order.

Saint Aloysius did not fear exposing his mortal body to the dangers of a man dying from the plague. He understood that suffering and physical death, both of which are punishments for Original Sin, are not the most dangerous things for a human being. Exposure to the near occasions of sin was what could result in the eternal death of the soul. Far better to be exposed to the diseases of mortal flesh than to contaminate both body and soul by a lukewarmness of spirit and/or by the casual embrace of sin and sinful influences in the course of one’s daily life. Saint Aloysius teaches us to recognize that our souls must be kept free from the contagion of sin and error lest we die of the spiritual plagues of pride, lust, envy, gluttony, anger, sloth and greed and their permutations. His confessor, Saint Robert Bellarmine, believed that it was most certainly the case that Saint Aloysius had never committed a Mortal Sin in his entire life. It is possible for one to cooperate with the graces won for the many on the wood of the Holy Cross by the shedding of every single drop of the Divine Redeemer’s Most Precious Blood to scale the heights of personal sanctity so that he can gain he highest place in Heaven next to that of the Blessed Mother herself.

Saint Aloysius had four great devotions in his daily life: the first was, as mentioned before, to Our Lord in His Real Presence in the Most Blessed Sacrament. Indeed, it is a special wonder in the Providence of God this year, 2009, that the feast of Saint Aloysius Gonzaga is commemorated secondarily today, the Third Sunday after Pentecost, within the Octave of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, which beats for us which such love in the Eucharist.

The second of Saint Aloysius’ great devotions was to the Passion of Our Lord. He united all of his very intense sufferings to Our Lord’s Passion as he was dying from the effects of the plague. He wanted to conform his life to the standard of the Holy Cross at every moment of his existence.

The third of Saint Aloysius’s great devotions was to the Blessed Virgin Mary, of whom he never ceased to think or to plead for her motherly intercession.

Finally, the fourth great devotion of this most pure Jesuit saint was to the angels, whose glories he celebrated in what is believed to be the only writing of his that has survived him.

Even though he practiced these devotions with purity and fervor of spirit, Saint Aloysius asked Saint Robert Bellarmine if it was possible for a soul to go directly to Heaven without having to suffer in Purgatory. Saint Robert Bellarmine said that it was possible, thus inspiring Saint Aloysius to pray ceaselessly as he was dying from the plague, a malady that took his life around midnight at the end of the Octave Day of Corpus Christi, June 21, 1591.

Four hundred nineteen years have passed since his death. The brightness of his love for Our Lord in His Real Presence still illumines the path of those First Communicants, who are given Saint Aloysius as an example to imitate as they prepare to receive Our Lord for the first time in Holy Communion. How fitting it is that both Pope Benedict XIII and Pope Pius XI declared Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, S.J., the patron of youth.

You see, all we need to do to turn back the plagues of sin and sinful influences that seek to besmirch and ensnare the young today is to teach them about saints such as Saint Aloysius Gonzaga and Saint Therese Lisieux and Saint Dominic Savio and Saint John Berchmans and Saint Stanislaus Kostka. There is no need at all for the evil of various “instruction programs” as to how to avoid sins of impurity. All a young Catholic needs is the good example of Saint Aloysius and Saint Therese and Saint Dominic Savio to prompt him or her to reject sin and to cooperate more fervently with the God’s grace as a consecrated slave of Our Lady’s Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart.

Although there are some, yes, even in fully traditional circles, who believe students do not have to pursue excellence as befits redeemed creatures, that they can be content with “average” efforts and live lives content with mediocrity as they overindulge in sporting activities and other recreations, Saint Aloysius teaches us to work hard at the pursuit of excellence in our studies no matter our abilities. We work hard as befits redeemed creatures to please God, Who has not created us to live “average” or “mediocre” lives. Although we are given different intellectual gifts, God expects each one of us to give Him our very best efforts, especially as we seek to sanctify our immortal souls as members of His true Church and as we endeavor to root out vice and sin from even our thoughts, no less our words and deeds, withdrawing more and more from the world and from a spirit of worldliness. The innocence and purity of Saint Aloysius Gonzaga teaches us to love God–Father, Son and Holy Ghost–with hearts that have been purified in the Baptismal font and regenerated again and again in the Sacred Tribunal of Penance, strengthened in love for God, Who is Love, by acts of voluntary mortification and penance, by lives of profound Eucharistic piety and deep, tender devotion to the Mother of God.

Dom Prosper Gueranger, O.S.B., made this point about Saint Aloysius in The Liturgical Year:

Again, it is by Mary Magdalene de Pazzi, the depository of the secrets of the Spouse, that this mystery is revealed to us. In the rapture during which the glory of Aloysius was thus displayed before her eyes, she thus continues, while still under the influence of the Holy Ghost: ‘Who could ever explain the value and the power of interior acts? The glory of Aloysius is so great simply because he acted thus interiorly. Between an interior act and that which is seen, there is no comparison possible. Aloysius, as long as he dwelt on earth, kept his eye attentively fixed on the Word; and this is just why he is so splendid. Aloysius was a hidden martyr; whosoever love thee, my God, knoweth thee to be so great, so infinitely lovable, that keen indeed is the martyrdom of such a one, to see clearly that he loves thee not so much as he desireth to love thee, and that thou art not loved by thy creatures, but art offended! . . . Thus he became a martyrdom unto himself. Oh! did love while on earth! Wherefore now in heaven he possesses God in a sovereign plenitude of love. While still mortal, he discharged his bow at he heart of the Word; and now that he is heaven, his arrows are all lodged in his own heart. For this communication of the Divinity, which he merited by the arrows of his act of love and of union with God, he now verily and indeed possesses and clasps for ever’.

To love God, to allow his grace to turn our heart towards infinite Beauty, which allow can fill it, such is then the true secret of highest perfection. Who can fail to see how this teaching of to-day’s feast answers to the end pursued by the Holy Ghost ever since his coming down at our glorious Pentecost? This sweet and silent teaching was given by Aloysius, wheresoever he turned his steps, during his short career. Born to heaven, in holy Baptism, almost before he was born to earth, he was a very angel from his cradle; grace seemed to gush from him into those who bore him their arms, filling them with heavenly sentiments. At four years of age he followed the marquis his father into the camps; and thus some unconscious faults, which had not so much as tarnished his innocence, became for the rest of his life the object of a penitence that one would have thought beseemed some grievous sinner. He was but nine years old when, being taken to Florence, there to be perfected in the Italian language, he became the edification of the court of duke Francis: but though the most brilliant in Italy, it failed to have any attraction for him, and rather served to detach him more decisively than ever from the world. During this period, likewise, at the feet of the miraculous picture of the Annunziata, he consecrated his virginity to our Lady.

The Church herself, in the Breviary Lessons, will relate the other details of that sweet life, in which, as is ever the case with souls fully docile to the Holy Ghost, heavenly piety never marred what was of duty in earthly things. It is because he was a true model for all youth engaged in study, that Aloysius has been proclaimed their protector. Of a singularly quick intelligence, a faithful to work as to prayer in the gay turmoil of city life, he mastered all the sciences then exacted of one of his rank. Very intricate negotiations of worldly interest were more than once confided to his management: and thus was an opportunity afforded of realizing to what a high degree he might have excelled in government affairs. Here, again, he comes forward as an example to such as have friends and relatives who would fain hold them back, when on the threshold of the religious state, under pretence of the great good they may do in the world, and how much evil they may prevent. Just as though the Most High must be contented with useless nonentities in that select portion of men He reserves to himself amidst nations; or, as though the aptitudes of the richest and most gifted natures may not be turned all the better and all the more completely to God, their very principle, precisely because they are the most perfect. On the other hand, neither the State nor Church ever really loses anything by this fleeing to God, this apparent throwing away of the best subjects! If, in the old law, Jehovah showed himself jealous in having the very best of all kinds of goods offered at his altar, his intention was not to impoverish his people. Whether admitted or not, it is a certain fact that the chief strength of society, the fountain-head of benediction and protection to the world, is always to be found in holocausts well-pleasing to the Lord. (Dom Prosper Gueranger, O.S.B., The Liturgical Year, Volume XII: Time After Pentecost: Book III, pp. 193-195.)

May we always instruct our children to be likewise diligent in their studies for love of God, never content with mediocrity or sloth at any time for any reason whatsoever. It takes hard work to get home to Heaven, and we are to work hard in our state-in-life, yes, even if we are children. Playtime is wonderful. We are not made by God to play all of the time, worse yet to be possessed of the Americanist spirit of anti-intellectualism that loathes study as being somehow an “interference” with “fun stuff.” This is the path to Hell, not Heaven. Saint Aloysius shows us how to get to Heaven! Where do you want your children to go?

Dom Gueranger wrote this beautiful prayer to Saint Aloysius, found in The Liturgical Year:

“Venerable old age is not that of long time, nor counted by the number of years: but the understanding of man is grey hairs; and a spotless life is old age.” (Wisdom 4: 8-9) And therefore, Aloysius, thou dost hold a place of honour amidst the ancients of they people! Glory be to the holy Society in the midst whereof thou didst, in so short a space, fulfill a long course; obtain that she may ever continue to treasure, both for herself and others, the teaching that flows that thy life of innocence and love. Holiness is the one only thing, when life is ended, that can be called a true gain; and holiness is acquired from within. External works count with God, only in as far as the interior breath that inspires them is pure; if occasion for exercising works be wanting, man can easily always supply the deficiency by drawing nigh unto the Lord, in the secrecy of his soul, as much as, and even more than, he could have done by their means. Thus didst thou see and understand the question; and therefore prayer, which held thee absorbed in its ineffable delights, succeeded in making thee equal to the very martyrs. What a priceless treasure was prayer in thine eyes, what a heaven-lent boon, and one that is indeed in our reach, too, just as it was in thine! But in order to find therein, as thou didst express it, ‘the short cut to perfection,’ perseverance is needed and a careful elimination from the soul, by a generous self-repression, of every emotion which is not of God. For how could muddy or troubled waters mirror forth the image of him who stands on their brink? Even so, a soul that is sullied, or a soul that without being quite a slave of passion is not yet mistress of every earthly perturbation, can never reach the object of prayer, which is to reproduced within her the tranquil image of her God.

The reproduction of the one great model was perfect in thee; and hence it can be seen how nature (as regards what she has of good), far from losing or suffering aught, rather gains by this process of recasting in the divine crucible. Even in what touches the most legitimate affections, thou didst look at things no loner form the earthly point of view; but beholding all in God, far were the things of sense transcended, with all their deceptive feebleness, and wondrously did thy love grow in consequence! For instance, what could be more touching than thy sweet attentions, not only upon earth, but even from thy throne in heaven, for that admirable woman given thee by our Lord to be thine earthly mother? Where may tenderness be found equal to the affection effusions written to her by thee in that letter of a saint to the mother of a saint, which thou didst address to her shortly before quitting thine earthly pilgrimage? And still more, what exquisite delicacy thou didst evince, in making her the recipient of thy first miracle, worked after thine entrance into glory! Furthermore, the Holy Ghost, by setting thee on fire with the flame of divine charity, developed also within thee immense love for thy neighbour: necessarily so because charity is essentially one; and well was this proved when thou wast seen sacrificing thy life so blithely for the sock and the plague-stricken.

Cease not, O dearest saint, to aid us in the midst of so many miseries; lend a kindly hand to each and all. Christian youth has a special claim upon they patronage, for it is by the Sovereign Pontiff himself that this precious portion of the flock is gathered around thy throne. Direct their feeble steps along the right path, so often enticed to turn into dangerous by-roads; may prayer and earnest toil, for God’s dear sake, be their stay and safeguard; may they be enlightened in the serious matter before them of choosing a state of life. We beseech thee, dearest saint, exert strong influence over them during this most critical period of their opening years, so that they may truly experience all the potency of that fair privilege which is ever thine, of preserving in thy devout clients the angelical virtue! Yea, furthermore, Aloysius, look compassionately on those who have not imitated thine innocence, and obtain that they may yet follow thee in the example of thy penance; such is the petition of holy Church this day.

We pray, therefore, to Saint Aloysius on this day, June 21, so that those of us who may have been been impure in thought, word and deed in the past might become serious about the pursuit of holiness and embrace with joy the cross of penance and humiliation as the true pathway to making our souls as white as they were when we wore white suits and white ties and white shoes and white socks and white shirts (or white dresses and white veils) at the time we received our First Holy Communion. May Saint Aloysius, a pure lover of the Eucharist, help us to spend many hidden hours in prayer before the tabernacle, keeping company with Our Lady and all of the angels and saints, including Saint Aloysius himself, as we pray as many Rosaries each day as our states-in-life permit.

This prayer, composed by Saint Aloysius himself is one that we ought to pray every single day of our lives:

O holy Mary, my Mistress,
into thy blessed trust
And special keeping,
into the bosom of thy tender
Mercy, this day, every day of my life
and at the hour of my death,
I commend my soul and body; to thee
I entrust all my hopes and
consolations,
All my trials and miseries, my life and
the end of my life, that through thy most
Holy intercession and thy merits,
all my actions may be ordered and
disposed according
To thy will and that of thy divine Son.
Amen.

Vivat Christus Rex! Viva Cristo Rey!

Litany to Saint Aloysius (for private use only)

Lord, have mercy on us.

Christ, have mercy on us.

Lord, have mercy on us.

Christ, hear us.

Christ, graciously hear us.

God, the Father of heaven, Have mercy on us.

God, the Son, Redeemer of the world, Have mercy on us.

God, the Holy Ghost, the Sanctifier, Have mercy on us.

Holy Trinity, one God, Have mercy on us.

Holy Mary, Pray for us.

Holy Mother of God, Pray for us.

Holy Virgin of virgins, Pray for us.

Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, Pray for us.

Beloved child of Christ, Pray for us.

Delight of the Blessed Virgin, Pray for us.

Most chaste youth, Pray for us.

Angelic youth, Pray for us.

Most humble youth, Pray for us.

Model of young students, Pray for us.

Despiser of riches, Pray for us.

Enemy of vanities, Pray for us.

Scorner of honors, Pray for us.

Honor of princes, Pray for us.

Jewel of the nobility, Pray for us.

Flower of innocence, Pray for us.

Ornament of a religious state, Pray for us.

Mirror of mortification, Pray for us.

Mirror of perfect obedience, Pray for us.

Lover of evangelical poverty, Pray for us.

Most affectionately devout, Pray for us.

Most zealous observer of rules, Pray for us.

Desirous of the salvation of souls, Pray for us.

Perpetual adorer of the Holy Eucharist, Pray for us.

Particular client of Saint Ignatius, Pray for us.

Be merciful: Spare us, O Lord. Be merciful: Hear us, O Lord.

From the concupiscence of the eyes: O Lord, deliver us.

From the concupiscence of the flesh: O Lord, deliver us.

From the pride of life: O Lord, deliver us.

Through the merits and intercessions of St. Aloysius: O Lord, deliver us.

Through his angelic purity: O Lord, deliver us.

Through his sanctity and glory: O Lord, deliver us.

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world: Spare us, O Lord.

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world: Graciously hear us, O Lord.

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world: Have mercy on us.

Christ, hear us.

R. Christ, graciously hear us.

V. Pray for us, Saint Aloysius:

R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray:

O Blessed Aloysius! adorned with Angelic graces, I, thy most unworthy servant, recommend especially to thee the chastity of my soul and body, praying thee, by thy angelic purity, to plead for me with Jesus Christ the Immaculate Lamb, and His most holy Mother, Virgin of virgins, that they would vouchsafe to keep me from all grievous sin. O never let me be defiled with any stain against my chastity; but when thou dost see me in temptation, or in danger of falling, then remove far from me all bad thoughts and wicked desires; and awaken in me the memory of an eternity to come, and of Jesus crucified. Impress deeply in my heart a sense of the holy fear of God, and thus kindling in me the fire of thy divine love, enable me so to follow thy footsteps here on earth, that in heaven with thee, I may be made worthy to enjoy the sight of our God forever. Through Our Lord Jesus Christ. Amen.

Pray one Our Father, Hail Mary and Glory be.

 

 

 

Statue of Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, Saint Aloysius Church, Great Neck, New York, November 24, 2007.